Point of view helped the cast of New Girl

Point Of View Allows Us, And Nick Miller, To Grow

Point-of-view is everything. To Winston, Nick was procrastinating on his zombie novel; to Nick, it was a life experience at the zoo.

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Difference in perspective is what allows us to grow as a society and learn from one another. Take Nick Miller (from "New Girl") for example. Living as a bartender with the aspirations of an author, Nick wrote a zombie novel. It was terrible—which was not all that surprising—but he included a word search, and all great authors include a word search.

The point of Nick's journey to becoming an awful writer is that he decided to live as Ernest Hemmingway did. By living in the moment, Nick forced his good friend Winston to wake up from his adjusted schedule and accompany him to the zoo. A trip like this isn't out of the ordinary, but Nick made sure to change that. In addition to Winston, Nick brought a flask with him to ensure he could live wild and free like Hemmingway. During this event, Nick was convinced he was living the writer's life, while Winston merely said: "Nick this isn't life experience, this is drunk at the zoo."

This is where perspective comes in. Many people would agree that Nick was simply hammered at the zoo, but point-of-view allows Nick to use his drunkenness as a way to fuel his motivation. Winston saw drunk Nick, Nick saw drunk Nick; the importance is how they viewed it. One saw an idiot and the other saw the potential to become everything Hemmingway was. This odd journey shows us that how other people view the situation is rarely ever how we see it ourselves. Having the patience and open mind to see things as others do will push us further in life. We grow as individuals and then hopefully as a society.

Having different points of view can also keep us in check. Winston was right that Nick wasted a whole day. By confronting him about it, Nick was forced into the reality that he was once again procrastinating. Although the day motivated Nick to finish the novel, it was also Winston's blunt truth that caused him to work harder. No one likes to be called out, but sometimes it puts us back on track.

So what can we do with perspectives? We can grow irritable when others disagree with us. We can argue a point or we can build our patience and hear the other side of the story. Differing in point-of-view can be draining but ultimately it grows our society. If everyone thought the same and made the same choices, our trajectory would have far less potential. People change; mindsets change, but it's how we get to those changes that matter.

Nick and Winston constantly roast each other. That might not be the best way to deal with things, but it shows one another they can grow in places they hadn't before. Without Winston, Nick wouldn't have finished his novel, and without Nick, Winston would still be convinced he likes his adjusted schedule.

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To The Nursing Major During The Hardest Week Of The Year

I know that no grade can possibly prove what kind of nurse you will be. I know that no assignment will showcase your compassion. I know that no amount of bad days will ever take away the empathy inside of you that makes you an exceptional nurse.

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To the Nursing Major During Finals Week,

I know you're tired, I know you're stressed, and I know you feel like you can't go on. I know that no part of this seems fair, and I know you are by far the biggest critic of yourself. I know that you've thought about giving up. I know that you feel alone. I know that you wonder why in the world you chose one of the hardest college majors, especially on the days it leaves you feeling empty and broken.

But, I also know that you love nursing school. I know your eyes light up when you're with patients, and I know your heart races when you think of graduation. I know that you love the people that you're in school with, like truly, we're-all-in-this-together, family type of love. I know that you look at the older nurses with admiration, just hoping and praying that you will remain that calm and composed one day. I know that every time someone asks what your college major is that you beam with pride as you tell them it's nursing, and I know that your heart skips a beat knowing that you are making a difference.

I know that no grade can possibly prove what kind of nurse you will be. I know that no assignment will showcase your compassion. I know that a failed class doesn't mean you aren't meant to do this. I know that a 'C' on a test that you studied so. dang. hard. for does not mean that you are not intelligent. I know that no amount of bad days will ever take away the empathy inside of you that makes you an exceptional nurse.

I know that nursing school isn't fair. I know you wish it was easier. I know that some days you can't remember why it's worth it. I know you want to go out and have fun. I know that staying up until 1:00 A.M. doing paperwork, only to have to be up and at clinicals before the sun rises is not fair. I know that studying this much only to be failing the class is hard. I know you wish your friends and family understood. I know that this is difficult.

Nursing school isn't glamorous, with the white lab coat and stethoscope. Nursing school is crying, randomly and a lot. Nursing school is exhaustion. Nursing school is drinking so much coffee that you lose track. Nursing school is being so stressed that you can't eat. Nursing school is four cumulative finals jam-packed into one week that is enough to make you go insane.

But, nursing school is worth it. I know that when these assignments are turned in and finals are over, that you will find the motivation to keep going. I know that one good day of making a difference in a patient's life is worth a hundred bad days of nursing school.

Keep hanging in there, nursing majors. It'll all be worth it— this I know, for sure.

So, if you have a nursing major in your life, hug them and tell them that you're proud of them. Nursing school is tough, nursing school is scary, and nursing school is overwhelming; but a simple 'thank-you' from someone we love is all we need to keep going.

Sincerely,

A third-year nursing student who knows

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From One Nerd To Another

My contemplation of the complexities between different forms of art.

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Aside from reading Guy Harrison's guide to eliminating scientific ignorance called, "At Least Know This: Essential Science to Enhance Your Life" and, "The Breakthrough: Immunotherapy and the Race to Cure Cancer" by Charles Graeber, an informative and emotional historical account explaining the potential use of our own immune systems to cure cancer, I read articles and worked on my own writing in order to keep learning while enjoying my winter break back in December. I also took a trip to the Guggenheim Museum.


I wish I was artistic. Generally, I walk through museums in awe of what artists can do. The colors and dainty details simultaneously inspire me and remind me of what little talent I posses holding a paintbrush. Walking through the Guggenheim was no exception. Most of the pieces are done by Hilma af Klint, a 20th-century Swedish artist expressing her beliefs and curiosity about the universe through her abstract painting. I was mostly at the exhibit to appease my mom (a K - 8th-grade art teacher), but as we continued to look at each piece and read their descriptions, I slowly began to appreciate them and their underlying meanings.


I like writing that integrates symbols, double meanings, and metaphors into its message because I think that the best works of art are the ones that have to be sought after. If the writer simply tells you exactly what they were thinking and how their words should be interpreted, there's no room for imagination. An unpopular opinion in high school was that reading "The Scarlet Letter" by Nathaniel Hawthorne was fun. Well, I thought it was. At the beginning of the book, there's a scene where Hawthorne describes a wild rosebush that sits just outside of the community prison. As you read, you are free to decide whether it's an image of morality, the last taste of freedom and natural beauty for criminals walking toward their doom, or a symbol of the relationship between the Puritans with their prison-like expectations and Hester, the main character, who blossoms into herself throughout the novel. Whichever one you think it is doesn't matter, the point is that the rosebush can symbolize whatever you want it to. It's the same with paintings - they can be interpreted however you want them to be.


As we walked through the building, its spiral design leading us further and further upwards, we were able to catch glimpses of af Klint's life through the strokes of her brush. My favorite of her collections was one titled, "Evolution." As a science nerd myself, the idea that the story of our existence was being incorporated into art intrigued me. One piece represented the eras of geological time through her use of spirals and snails colored abstractly. She clued you into the story she was telling by using different colors and tones to represent different periods. It felt like reading "The Scarlet Letter" and my biology textbook at the same time. Maybe that sounds like the worst thing ever, but to me it was heaven. Art isn't just art and science isn't just science. Aspects of different studies coexist and join together to form something amazing that will speak to even the most untalented patron walking through the museum halls.

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