18 Things That Only Children Are Tired Of Hearing

18 Things That Only Children Are Tired Of Hearing

Throughout my 18 years, I've received a lot of annoying, rude, or just plain weird questions/comments from people after they find out that I'm my parents' only kid. Here's the worst of the worst.

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I do not have any siblings, which a lot of people find to be weird or unusual. Because of that, they tend to say weird or unusual things. I'm not a huge fan of a lot of the things that they say to me.

1. "You must be super spoiled!"

I am more spoiled than I would be if I had siblings, I'll admit that. However, my parents are still ultimately working-class people who did, in fact, raise me to be independent. It's rude to assume that I'm spoiled or that I get everything handed to me!

2. "I'm so sorry, that must be awful!"

I get that you have the best of intentions and you are just trying to offer sympathy; poor little me must have grown up completely friendless and alone, right? Wrong!

Just because I don't have siblings, it doesn't mean I don't have other family, friends, and neighbors to look to for guidance. When I was younger, I would play with my friends at school or in my neighborhood. Sure, I definitely get lonely sometimes and do wish that I had a sibling or two, but it's not the end of the world.

3. "Ugh, I wish I was you!"

On the other end of the spectrum, people have said this to me. Yup, it's true, I've never had to deal with sibling rivalry or fight with someone over the remote or chores. But like I said above, it CAN get lonely, and it's not necessarily a coveted life.

4. "Oh, so you're an introvert?"

To be fair, yes, I am introverted, but there's no relationship between me being an introvert and me being an only child. I've met plenty of extroverted only children, and plenty of introverted children with siblings.

5. "College must have been a HUGE ADJUSTMENT!"

Again, this one is partly true; it took some time to get used to having a roommate. But this comment gets boring after awhile. College is an adjustment to anyone, not just only children.

6. "Do you even have any friends besides your parents?"

Obviously, I do, yes, although I will admit that I'm close to both of my parents. But there's no need to assume that an only child's best friends are their parents. I mean, you don't assume that all siblings are best friends, right? So, why assume that someone WITHOUT siblings is friends with the only other people in their house?

7. "You must have trouble sharing!"

I was still raised with manners, you know. I went to daycare, preschool, and kindergarten just like you did, wherein I learned how to share and play with other kids.

8. "I bet that you love attention."

Not necessarily. Sure, everyone is a fan of positive attention, but I don't see myself as liking or needing it more than anyone else does. Am I perhaps more used to my parents' attention than someone with siblings may be? Sure. But do I love it more than those people do? No, I don't believe so.

9. "Guess this means you'll never be an aunt."

I can still...get married...and become an aunt that way. Even if I happen to marry another only child, well, it'll be alright! This is just frankly a shitty thing to hear, and it makes me feel almost guilty in some way. I can't help the fact that I don't have siblings. Even if I truly never end up becoming an aunt, that doesn't mean I'm incomplete or anything. I'll still have other family!

Just don't tell only children that they'll never be an aunt/uncle/etc. It really hurts our feelings.

10. "Are you going to have a lot of your own kids?"

I might, I might not! I just don't like the assumption that I need to "make up for something that I didn't have." If I have a lot of kids, cool. If I have a few, great. If I have one, nice. If I have zero, I'm running out of adjectives, but you get the picture. Just because I'm an only child, it does not necessarily mean I'll want my hypothetical future children to be the opposite.

11. "That means you're SUPER INDEPENDENT, right?"

This is complicated because I AM independent, but I don't think it has much to do with me being an only kid. I like to believe that my parents would've taught my siblings the same things they taught me if I had any. I'm not extremely independent, just as much as one would expect.

It's not like I came out of the womb and started filing taxes immediately. Sure, I had no older siblings to lean on, but I still had caring parents and fun childhood.

12. "That sounds peaceful."

Some aspects of it were, but it was a double-edged sword. I do find myself yearning for the chaos and craziness of having a big family, or at least ONE other sibling.

13. "You don't seem like an only child, though."

Wow, are you shocked? I am! Shocked that you would say that, I mean. What does that even mean? How is an only child supposed to act? Are you relying off of stereotypes, perhaps?

14. "I'm not surprised that you're an only child."

This is sort of the opposite of the above comment. It's just a passive-aggressive remark about how I come off as bratty or spoiled, I suppose? Newsflash: I truly am not those things, and if I act annoying, just call me out and I'll apologize and change. No need for you to bring my lack of siblings into it. No correlation!

15. "Were you homeschooled?"

Yes, I've actually been asked this upon revealing that I'm an only child. I guess the thought process is, "She was an only child, so her parents had no one else to focus on. So, she must have been homeschooled." But that's just a guess, because this assumption truly makes zero sense at all.

I was not homeschooled. I went to public elementary, middle, and high schools, and I am now in college.

16. "Aww, I bet you're shy!"

You think that because I was somewhat sheltered and lonely during my young years, that I must be shy. I'm not! Well, maybe a little bit at first, but it has nothing to do with the fact that I was raised without siblings.

17. "Christmas/Birthdays/Hanukkah/Holidays must be nice."

Look, I'm not going to deny that I get more gifts and food than I would if I had siblings. But I'd sacrifice extra presents, money, and snacks for someone to share it with.

18. "So like...all of your friends growing up were in your head?"

I did have imaginary friends like most children do. Perhaps I did have them for a bit longer than I should've (summer before first grade). But I had real, in-the-flesh friends, too. What's wrong with imaginary friends, anyway?

On a related note, I'll admit that I still talk to myself sometimes, not out of the horrors of only-child loneliness, but because it genuinely helps me focus when I'm trying to remember something or work something out. My parents are convinced that it stems from the fact that I had no one to talk to when I was little, but I'm not convinced. I think I'm just weird.

This list may seem like a lot, but mostly, it comes down to common sense when you think about it. I understand that people tend to view only children as a sort of minority and that those who grew up with siblings will be VERY curious about what our lives and childhoods were like.

That's absolutely fine! I'll answer pretty much any reasonable question about my childhood, but some questions and statements get really repetitive after a while, to say the least.

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When You Make A Girl An Aunt, You Change Her World In All The Best Ways

When you make a girl an aunt, you make her the happiest girl in the world.

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My brother and his wife recently blessed our family with the sweetest bundle of joy on planet earth. OK, I may be a little bias but I believe it to be completely true. I have never been baby crazy, but this sweet-cheeked angel is the only exception. I am at an age where I do not want children yet, but being able to love on my nephew like he is my own is so satisfying.

When you make a girl an aunt, you make her a very protective person.

From making sure the car seat is strapped in properly before every trip, to watching baby boy breathe while he sleeps, you'll never meet someone, besides mommy and daddy of course, who is more concerned with the safety of that little person than me.

When you make a girl an aunt, you give her a miniature best friend.

There is something about an aunt that is so fun. An aunt is a person you go to when you think you're in trouble or when you want something mom and dad said you couldn't have. An aunt is someone who takes you to get ice cream and play in the park to cool down after having a temper tantrum. I can't wait to be the one he runs to.

When you make a girl an aunt, she gets to skip on the difficulty of disciplining.

Being an aunt means you get to be fun. Not to say I wouldn't correct my nephew if he were behaving poorly, but for the most part, I get to giggle and play and leave the hard stuff for my brother.

When you make a girl an aunt, you give her the best listening ears.

As of right now I only listen to the sweet coos and hungry cries but I am fully prepared to listen to all the problems in his life in the future.

When you make a girl an aunt, you make her the best advice giver.

By the time my nephew needs advice, hopefully, I will have all of my life lessons perfected into relatable stories.

When you make a girl an aunt, you make her a number-one fan

Anything you do in life sweet boy, I will be cheering you on. I already know you are going to do great things.

When you make a girl an aunt, she learns what true love is.

The love I have for my nephew is so pure. Its the love that is just there. I don't have to choose to show love every day, I don't have to forgive, I don't have to worry if it is reciprocated, it is just there.

When you make a girl an aunt, you make her the happiest person in the world.

I cannot wait to watch my precious nephew grow into the amazing person that I know he is going to be.

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Looking Back At My Past

When I moved out of my dad's house at 18, I learned several life lessons the hard way. It was an uphill battle to figure out "adulting." I hope this will give some people the ability to learn certain things without going down the hard path.

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Life has a way of teaching lessons when you are overwhelmed. The more you are exposed to, the easier it is to learn these lessons. This article goes into what I wish I knew when I first got onto my own. There were many struggles, hardships and tough times you go through when you start your walk of life alone. But with it comes victories, and the knowledge of being able to get through anything. I hope when people read this article they will see what I put as a priority to learn when you become independent.

1. Money!

Learn how to budget! Learn how you're bank works, learn about taxes. Yes these seem like boring subjects, but money, or the lack thereof, can and will make your life miserable. This is something that many adults have trouble with, and it will put stress onto you. Just taking an afternoon to learn about what you need to do for your money needs will reduce stress.

2. Make at least one friend at the place you live.

The first apartment complex I lived at, I met a (I think) 45-50 year old man. I will not actually say his name but for this purpose his name is "Tim". Tim had lived in that complex for about 20 years, and he knew the staff and the residents. If I needed help or someone to talk to. He was more of a father figure than a creepy old guy. I was new to the town, living by myself, in the middle ground between a couple of in-town gangs. I needed all the help I could get, and when you have a connection it helps.

3. Know the differences between needs and wants.

Figure out your needs: food, rent, utilities. This type of thing ties into money and time. Do not invest too much time in people that are not good for you. Invest your time in your interests, hobbies, things that make you content. When you put your time in someone who at the end isn't worth it, it will occupy your mind months after they are gone.

4. Stay in contact with your family. 

My family is pretty distant to each other. We could probably go a year without talking and it wouldn't bug me. My mom and I have gotten close recently. Generally the 'after high school' years. My mom has helped me through hard times, she has leaded me an ear, or some tough advice. Yes we've had our hard times, but there are many things that I have learned from her. I understand that once you get out on your own, it is easy to stop talking to them; especially if you had a rough time growing up. A story for another time, but if you can stay in contact even if it's as little as a text from now and then. Family is something that is hard to replace once they are gone.

5. The way life teaches lessons. 

Life will teach lessons easy at first, then they will get harder to learn as we get older. An example of this is keeping your room clean as a child, then when you have an apartment. There is more cleaning to do. If you add kids and a house to that, it's even harder. My mom has an odd way of explaining this lesson. "It's like getting hit with a 2x4." The lesson first hits you, and it's small like a golf ball. Then the baseball hits you if you didn't learn before. Before you know it you get hit by a 2x4 and the lesson will hurt in someway. So please learn it before you get hit with a 2x4.

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