Odyssey Impact: When Posting On Odyssey Gets You Your Dream Job

Odyssey Impact: When Posting On Odyssey Gets You Your Dream Job

Karley Nugent's post on her incredible summer at Yellowstone landed her a position in the park.
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When Karley Nugent packed up her car and headed for Yellowstone National Park for a summer job, she knew she would have an unforgettable experience. What she didn’t know was that after that summer, and after posting about it on Odyssey, Yellowstone would offer her the opportunity of a lifetime.

Nugent’s love for Yellowstone started back in 2014 during a short family trip, and since then, her mission has been to be a part of the park.

“I signed up for the seasonal job, and I got it, and it was the most life changing summer of my life,” she said. “Couldn’t have been better… well maybe, if I could have stayed longer. But when I found out about Odyssey a year later, I wanted to explain how amazing Yellowstone is and use my writing to help others discover this place.”

Nugent has written a variety of Yellowstone articles, but her post on her summer experience showcased her passion for the park and her eagerness to show the world why a visit to Yellowstone is absolutely necessary:

She greeted everyone she met with warm smiles, forming bonds with people from all walks of life. The people of Yellowstone taught her that no matter where they come from, all people are humans who were meant to come together and share love. And she learned that people are part of what makes Yellowstone so special.

Within a few days, the post was already gaining traction with hundreds of shares.

“I’ve written about Yellowstone and my travels and some articles have had mild success, but this one is my most successful article to date,” Nugent said.

She was contacted by past and current Yellowstone workers, people who visited the park before, and others who told her they were inspired to experience what she wrote about.

“It was awe-inspiring for me to be able to connect with people and people who worked in Yellowstone and make friendships,” Nugent said. “It’s really humbling to see how much of an impact my piece had.”

Soon after the article gained traction, one of Nugent’s summer coworkers shared the article with Yellowstone’s head of human resources. The department enjoyed her article so much they requested a phone call with her to thank her for the article.

And to offer her a position in the park.

“They said, ‘We’re really interested in your photography and writing and what your thought process is,” Nugent said. “‘We want to create a position for you. We want someone out here to write and photograph and video for us just like you’ve done for Odyssey.’”

The position, which tentatively starts at the end of May, will include working with the park’s social media team, creating original content, and assisting with additional projects in the park. Nugent will have a company car and living quarters right on premises.

“I’m sitting there thinking that this is my dream job and I can’t believe it was happening. I almost cried,” Nugent said. “This whole experience is so humbling just because I’ve worked so hard for this.”

Aside from securing an amazing first job out of school, Nugent is thankful for the overwhelmingly positive responses her article has received.

“The biggest best thing is when people tell me, ‘You make me want to go there,’” Nugent said. “I want to use writing and photography to inspire people to travel and give them these experiences. And now because of Odyssey, I can.”

Cover Image Credit: Karley Nugent

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7 Truths About Being A Science Major

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Whether your major is Human Bio, Chemistry, Neuroscience or any other that deals with a lot of numbers, theories, experiments and impossibly memorizing facts, you know the pressures of pursuing a career in this field. So without further ado, here are seven truths about being a science major:

1. There is no “syllabus week.”

Coming back to college in the fall is one of the best times of the year. Welcome week has become most students' favorite on-campus holiday. But then you have syllabus week: another widely celebrated week of no responsibilities… Unless you’re a science major that is. While your other friends get to enjoy this week of getting to know their professors and class expectations, you get to learn about IUPAC nomenclature of alkanes on the first day of organic chem.

2. Your heart breaks every time you have to buy a new textbook.

Somehow every professor seems to have their own “special edition” textbook for class… And somehow it’s always a couple hundred bucks… And somehow, it's ALWAYS required.

3. Hearing "attendance is not mandatory," but knowing attendance is VERY mandatory.

Your professor will tell you that they don’t take attendance. Your professor will put all lecture slides online. Your professor will even record their lectures and make those available as well. Yet if you still don’t go to class, you’ll fail for sure. Coming into lecture after missing just one day feels like everyone has learned an entire new language.

4. You’re never the smartest person in your class anymore.

No matter what subject, what class or what concentration, there will always be someone who is just that much better at it than you.

5. You get totally geeked out when you learn an awesome new fact.

Today in genetics you learned about mosaicism. The fact that somebody can have a disease in part of their total body cells but normal throughout all others gets you so hype. Even though you know that your family, friends and neighbors don’t actually care about your science facts, you HAVE to tell them all anyways.

6. There is never enough time in a day.

You are always stuck choosing between studying, eating, sleeping and having fun. If you're lucky, you'll get three of these done in one day. But if you're a risk taker, you can try to do all of these at once.

7. You question your major (and your sanity) almost daily.

This is especially true when it’s on a Tuesday night and you’ve already consumed a gallon of Starbucks trying to learn everything possible before your . Or maybe this is more prevalent when you have only made it through about half of the BioChem chapter and you have to leave for your three hour lab before your exam this afternoon. Regardless, you constantly wonder if all the stress is actually worth it, but somehow always decide that it is.

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I Had School Choice, And It Better Prepared Me For College

Not all students can excel in the traditional brick-and-mortar school setting.

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As the years progress and people grow tired of traditional public education, more and more options of schooling are opening up: charter schools, virtual schools, magnet schools, Montessori schools—the list goes on. Some people see this as detrimental to traditional public education and claim that charter schools and such are taking money away from public schools, but these schools are not doing that. In fact, charter schools are public schools, and they most times receive less funding due to costs such as food, transportation, and the costs of running a traditional school building are eliminated. With these areas cut, charter schools are able to pay their teachers more generously and have higher per-pupil funding, which is increasing with their rapid enrollment. Oklahoma-based Epic Charter Schools, the virtual, one-to-one charter school I attended, is first in teacher pay and fourteenth in enrollment statewide. Having the option to go from a traditional school setting to something as innovative as Epic Charter Schools benefited me, and my graduating class of over 1000, tremendously and prepared me for college better than any brick-and-mortar school could have.

Throughout my schooling, I always went to public school. School was my absolute favorite thing. I'm the kind of person who gets extremely excited to buy school supplies and choose my classes. In elementary, I became a part of the gifted and talented program, and I never found school particularly challenging. This didn't bother me when I was younger because it seemed like there was always something to do after classwork was finished, such as coloring sheets, reading, etc. But when I got into middle school, this changed and I stopped liking school as a whole. When I would finish my work in class, there would be nothing to do and it was always too loud to read, so I was at a loss. Because of the lack of challenge for me, when I knew there would be nothing for me to do in class, or it was just going to be a day where we watched a movie, I wouldn't go to school. I did this so often that in middle school I actually failed classes that I had As in because of my attendance. The fact that I failed classes because of my absences didn't surprise me as much as the fact that I could keep As in said classes while missing so many days that they decided to fail me.

My freshman year went about the same as my middle school years—I was still missing a lot of class, and I started putting less and less effort into my work because I just didn't like school anymore. Finally, in my sophomore year after I started driving, I quit going to school altogether. I had heard of Epic Charter Schools, and I took it into my own hands to get enrolled and withdraw from my brick-and-mortar. My family wasn't too supportive of this, but I pushed for it hard enough that they finally came around.

The first semester of Epic was rough, to say the least. It was the first time in a long time that my work was challenging, and whoever says a virtual school is easy, you're completely wrong. The difficulty of virtual school doesn't even come from the subject matter; it comes from the accountability. I had a teacher, but she wasn't at my house every day telling me to do my work, so I put it off for weeks at a time. After some time, I finally found a schedule and the following semesters' virtual classes were a breeze because my time management skills had developed so much.

When my junior year came around, I was excited to start concurrent enrollment at a local community college. Through Epic, I was allowed to take as many college courses as I wanted as long as I was taking at least one class through Epic. At a typical public school, students are only allowed to take two per semester; I was taking four, sometimes five college classes while still in high school, and they were actually challenging me.I'm sure most people think that sounds expensive, but it really wasn't. In the state of Oklahoma, high school students receive a waiver for six credit hours' tuition for no cost, only fees are paid. For me, through Epic I received an additional eight-hundred dollars in a learning fund, which I applied to my tuition. I also received a tribal scholarship for my concurrent courses in exchange for completing community service hours.

Through Epic, I was able to complete 52 hours of college credit completely debt-free WHILE STILL ENROLLED IN HIGH SCHOOL! The summer after I graduated, I completed my Associate's degree at Tulsa Community College (61 credit hours), which all transferred to my current school, the University of Oklahoma where I am studying Language Arts Education to become a teacher (if you're reading this, Epic administrators, call me in 2020 when I'm certified).

Not only am I graduating college two years early, but I am also saving my future self at least 50 thousand dollars of debt.

Most importantly, though, through Epic, I regained my love for learning.

Epic high school students and traditional students alike: please take advantage of the opportunities presented to you whether it be concurrent enrollment or vocational school. After high school, you will be so glad to have some college experience before going to a four-year university or to have a certificate to move into the workforce.

As the Epic's motto says: school CAN be different.


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