Moving Out For The Very First Time

Moving Out For The Very First Time

As the rooms now fill with my stuff, my anxiety and fears go away and I am confident that I can do this, and excited to see where this new chapter of my life takes me.
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When moving out at the age of 19, you come up with a lot of fears and thoughts that swarm through your head. Can I do this? Will I be able to afford it? What if I miss home too much? It’s hard to move out for the first time, it’s a really big step into becoming an adult. In a new apartment or home, especially one you’re not used to, can be a little scary, right? More importantly though, it’s exciting. You get to take new risks and you finally get to let go of your childhood to enter into adulthood.

When you’re a child, all you do is rely on your parents. That’s what they are there for, to guide you and teach you, also to prepare you for life. When you’re young, you can’t even imagine ever moving out, you think it’s so far away, you have nothing in the world to worry about. Then, the teen years come around and all you’re thinking about is, when you can finally move out and get out of here. It flashes by so fast you can’t even imagine. Now as I am moving out, I can’t believe it’s real. For me, it’s a little different because I didn’t get that college experience where you are already moved out of the house, living in dorms, on a campus, then moving into an apartment/house. I was already previously living at home while attending college to save money while I figured out what to do next. I finally decided to take a risk and move out.

All I had were the clothes and furniture from my room to start off with. I moved in with four of my best friends and I couldn't be happier. We all were a little unprepared, because we all didn’t expect this to happen so soon. We didn’t have anything really yet, just an empty house with our boxes of clothes. The first night we all just sat in the living room, with no couch, no chairs, nothing. We didn’t care though, all we could think about is how we're going to have so many memories in this house and how it didn’t even matter that we had nothing to start with. We talked all night on how excited we were that we have come to this point in our lives.

Saying goodbye to my parents was harder than I expected it to be. I had been dreaming of moving out for so long and it finally happened. I went over in my head a million times on how I was going to tell them. I didn’t want my parents to think I was moving out because of them, I wanted to do it for myself, to make bigger decisions now that I am getting older. I don’t ever want my parents to think I won’t go back and visit them, because I know for the first few months, I'm sure I will be calling them non-stop with random questions. I know that I will still be going over there all the time, too. Not just for them, but also to see my dogs, because how are you suppose to tell them you won’t see them everyday anymore?

All of this was very hard to overcome, but when I told them, they were nothing but supportive for my decision. They wanted me to be happy and to live my life, and I couldn’t be more thankful for that.

As the boxes now become fewer and fewer, it’s becoming more real. As the rooms now fill with my stuff, my anxiety and fears go away and I am confident that I can do this, and excited to see where this new chapter of my life takes me.

Cover Image Credit: Lindsey Janssen

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You Don't Need A Significant Other To Have The Perfect College Experience, Trust Me On This One

Make them the best four years of your life and don't let the stereotypes, especially this one, hold you back.
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Everyone dreams of having the so-called, "perfect college experience." Now, what even is that supposed to be? Is it supposed to be the way that college is presented in just about every film and television show out there? I sure hope not because, news flash, college is nothing like that. Of course, it is fun and hopefully will be the best four years of your life, but it is also full of constant ups and downs and is nowhere near "perfect."

There are a countless amount of stereotypes surrounding the "perfect college life" due to how films and television shows present it. A few being that college kids are supposed to look like supermodels all the time, ditch class, eat unhealthily, sleep all the time, are all in a sorority/fraternity, party every night, and find the love of their life.

Now, let's be honest here, you will not be looking your best as you roll into your 8 a.m. class each morning, or honestly your 2 p.m. class either. Not everybody will join a sorority/frat, and if you do, you won't join one that throws banging parties every single night of the week to entertain the campus. And going off of that, you won't get dressed up every night of the week to go party hopping with your friends. College kids don't just sit in their room and eat chips; many work out daily, whether it be hitting up the gym or participating in a sport and hit up the cafeteria after and get a well-balanced meal.

Honestly, college isn't just fun and games, you may find yourself spending some time alone in your dorm room watching Netflix or working on homework, and that's ok!

The majority of people at college do care about their classes and the work that they put into them, as they should since they are paying a crazy amount of money for them. Also, college kids don't just sleep all the time? If anything they hardly sleep! I don't even know how that stereotype began?

Finally, the worst stereotype of them all.

Apparently, to have the "perfect college experience" you need to find the love of your life.

Ok, no. This is entirely not true. If somehow you are lucky and come across somebody who is your perfect match then good for you, I wish I was you, but honestly, you are just one of the lucky ones. If you go to a school with a little over 2,000 people like me, you cannot expect to show up on campus and instantly find the love of your life. Yeah, you might have a better chance at a larger school, but still, you shouldn't expect it.

So, in the meantime why would you have "finding a significant other" be the goal of your college experience?

Why not work on finding a fantastic group of friends instead of that perfect boy/girl? It is ok to be independent and spend your time letting loose, and having fun! It is quite alright to show up at a party with a bunch of your gal/guy pals. Who says you need to be holding hands with somebody to get into a party or sit down and eat in the caf? Get out there and live that college life.

Make it the best four years of your life, and don't let the stereotypes, especially this one, hold you back.

Trust me, you do not need a significant other to have the perfect college experience. Have fun, be yourself, find some awesome friends, and you will have the time of your life. You don't need to be in love with somebody to have all that.

Cover Image Credit: Corbyn Jenkins

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What Don't You Have Time For?

Paying attention to your priorities
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Last week, my article consisted of inspirational quotes for when life gets hectic. As I enter into yet another week that is filled with papers, tests, meetings every night, and other commitments, I find myself pressed for time. A lot of things in my life, I am realizing, I "don't have time" for. But what does this really mean?

What does it mean when we say we "don't have time" for something?

There is a quote from the Wall Street Journal that comes to mind when reflecting on this issue:

"Instead of saying, 'I don't have time', try saying 'it's not a priority,' and see how that feels. Often, that's a perfectly adequate explanation. I have time to iron my sheets, I just don't want to. But other things are harder. Try it: 'I'm not going to edit your resume, sweetie, because it's not a priority.' 'I don't go to the doctor because my health is not a priority.' If these phrases don't sit well, that's the point. Changing our language reminds us that time is a choice. If we don't like how we're spending an hour, we can choose differently."

I have read this quote multiple times before, and it always has the same effect of forcing me to really think about my time and where it is going. Lately, I "haven't had time" to go to the gym or to journal or to pray. When my mom texted me last night to check in, I realized I also "haven't had time" to call home in over a week. I don't say this to judge myself or bring myself down.

I say this to call to attention that when I say "I don't have time" for things, this is revelatory of what my priorities are in the moment.

Right now, my priorities lie in schoolwork and juggling various social activities and clubs. No, there is nothing wrong with these things: a hard work ethic and strong bonds and relationships with those around me can do no harm, they actually strengthen me as a person. Still, it is important to realize what a certain emphasis on these two things can mean for other areas of my life, like self-care and relationships at home, and how these other two areas may be lacking right now.

Maybe I'm not ready to start making the changes for better habits or whatever else, but I have always found awareness to be the first step.

I hope that by even taking the time to reflect on where my time is going, what I am actually "doing" with my life, and what I am not doing at the moment, I will be brought into a new direction of choosing my time more carefully, and shifting my priorities.

Making sure your time is going to the right places takes self sacrifice.

If you want schoolwork to be a greater priority, it may mean giving up that one Netflix episode you've been dying to watch. If getting to the gym is one, it may mean getting to bed earlier so you'll be well rested for when you wake up early the next morning.

But for me, at least, shifting your lifestyle to one where you are happy with where your time is going, happy with your priorities, makes all the difference.

So, I urge you, readers, to think about your time. Think about the language you've used in the past days, weeks, or months: what are you saying you "don't have time" for, and do you really not have time for it or is it just not a priority? Think about whether or not you want to make any of these things a priority in the future, or if you want to change the way you use your time. Maybe you'll find that you are using your time perfectly for you; that could be the case. But do the exercise anyway, it can't hurt to consider what you might want to add or subtract from your life.



Talk to you next time,

Sam






Cover Image Credit: Pexels

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