Is there something missing at College of Charleston? Have we created our own social construction of what college on a small campus should look like? Every day, you will see a surplus of females walking down George, Calhoun, Coming, or any other given street associated with The College. For every seven girls, you're lucky to see three boys.

Each night that you decide to go out, you are well aware that you will be standing around girls the entirety of your evening. Whether you are looking for something or not; being approached by a guy or group of guys would be nice, right? For a while there, I thought it was just me in this seemingly endless rut of thinking I picked the wrong school or that I, myself, was doing college "wrong."

While it can obviously be argued that there is something wrong with the hookup culture at The College of Charleston, what about the lack of basic communication in general? I can count on one hand how many times I have talked to a person of the opposite sex in my classes for something other than class-related purposes. That is pathetic. People walk into classes, sit in the same seat every day, and make zero effort to communicate with those around them.

It's not for lack of trying, I try every day. However, it seems that people are stuck in this mentality where branching out seems like too much of a task.

The other night, a group of my girlfriends and I were sitting around talking, and one of them made a point as follows, "It's the same thing every day just different days. You go to a party and you'll wait around the entire night waiting to talk to someone once the party is over. That is if they haven't already left with someone else. The guys have the pick of the litter, and we are left to figure it all out in a matter of a few hours and drinks. Most nights I just end up heading home and stopping for street meat on Spring." Girls are forced to be more aggressive in this environment, and nine times out of ten, the guy you are interested is already involved either romantically or just physically with someone else.

People hang out with their cliques they formed in the dorms their freshman year, and if you find your way into their inner circle, it is likely because someone that is already included happens to be a long-time or hometown friend of yours. It makes us wonder, is it like this everywhere else? There are definitely pros to being at a smaller school, but the social cons are beyond excessive.

I don't know about everyone else, but I'd rather be conversing with those in my class or older rather than the various men that run the street meat stands at 1:30 A.M.