10 Of Michelangelo's Best Pieces, Ranked

10 Of Michelangelo's Best Pieces, Ranked

"The true work of art is but a shadow of the divine perfection." - Michelangelo

Mau
Mau
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During the Renaissance, we have been granted many different pieces of art from numerous famous artists. There was a lot of commissioned artwork, meaning that many artists only completed pieces that they were paid for. They did this because supplies and materials were hard to come by. One of these artists being the infamous sculptor and painter Michelangelo. Here, I highlight 10 of his best-commissioned pieces during this era.

10.  Bacchus

"Bacchus" was the Roman god of wine. Michelangelo depicted Bacchus holding grapes and a goblet in his hand in a commissioned piece. It was created between 1496-1497 and is located in the Bargello National Museum in Florence, Italy.

9. Dying Slave

Created between 1513-1516, "The Dying Slave" is one of the sculptural pieces for the tomb of Pope Julius II. Many scholars believed it depicts slavery that occurred during the Renaissance in Italy. It is located in the Louvre Museum in Paris, France.

8. Crucifix

What makes this interesting is the "San Spirito Crucifix" was created in 1492 when he was only 18 years old. It was a thank you piece to the Augustine monks who welcomed him after Michelangelo's patron passed away. This piece is located at the Basilica di Santo Spirito church in Florence, Italy.



7. Madonna of Bruges

"Madonna of Bruges" is a fascinating piece because it represents Virgin Mary and her son Jesus together. According to the Visit Bruges website, "It does not show a kind and warm mother gazing at her child; rather it depicts a mother who is sorrowful at what is to become of her son." It was created between 1501-1504, and is located in Bruges, Belgium.

6. The Last ​Judgement

"The Last Judgement" fresco painting depicts Christ and the verdict of The Last Judgement, which is explored in the Bible. It covers the altar wall of the Sistine Chapel in Vatican City, Rome. Fun fact: Michelangelo began this painting 25 years after completing the Sistine Chapel ceiling.

5. Moses

Michelangelo's "Moses" was sculpted between 1513-1515 and is one of the pieces designated for Pope Julius II's tomb. This portrays the biblical figure Moses with horns on its head. It is located in Basilica di San Pietro in Vincol church of Rome, Italy.

4. Angel

The "Angel" was created between 1494–1495, and was also the major plot device in the children's book From the Mixed-Up files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler. This marble piece is located in The Basilica of San Domenico church in Boglona, Italy.

3. Pieta

Created between 1498–1499, "Pieta" depicted the Virgin Mary holding the dead body of Christ. This is the only piece of work that Michelangelo signed his name on, which helped launched his career at the age of 24. It is located in St. Peter's Basilica in Vatican City.

2. David

Based on the biblical story of "David", this 17-foot tall marble sculpture was created between 1501-1504. Michelangelo began working on it when he was 26 years old! It is currently located in the Accademia Gallery in Florence, Italy.

1. The Creation of Adam

"The Creation of Adam" is Michelangelo's most notable pieces of art of all time. It shows God giving life to Adam, the first man. This fresco piece forms a part of the Sistine Chapel's ceiling, which he supposedly painted while on his back. The Sistine Chapel is located in Vatican City, Rome.

Though the Renaissance was centuries ago, Michelangelo's artwork is still celebrated today all around the world. We all must continue to appreciate the art which has inspired many artists of our modern society.

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The Importance Of Repetition In Art

You see it everywhere.
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Obsession, Repetition and Seriality

Do you ever notice a work of art that is composed of several smaller pieces? What about a process that is repeated over and over again within a composition? I'm speaking of artworks that requires the painstaking commitment of repetitive forms to exist as a piece. This motif in design is a lot more common than you may realize, and often holds conceptual meaning special to each artist.

As an instructor for the Fundamentals of 3D Design, I teach a lesson on this particular type of art. In many cases this can be described as "process art", though the term does not cover all facets of repetition in modern and contemporary art, which includes: Minimalism, Pop Art, Post-Minimalism, Environmental Art, Land Art and more through pieces that exist as sculptural forms, installations, paintings, assemblage, public monuments and fiber art.

Repetition in Art

Where You've Seen It:

Yayoi Kusama

Yayoi Kusama Compulsion Furniture (Accumulations Series), 1964Photo collage and paint

Repetition in Compulsion

Yayoi Kusama's life works are primarily composed of her signature polka dot patterns. Kusama has worked in a wide variety of mediums including painting, collage, sculpture, performance art and environmental installations, most of which exhibit her interest in pattern and repetition. Much of Kusama's work reflects the everyday compulsion and anxiety seeded in her life. As with her installation Compulsion Furniture, the artist obsessively covers pieces of found furniture covered in small, sewn protuberances. Metaphorically, they are interpreted as phalluses, a device with which the artist confronted her own deep-seated sexual anxieties.

Eva Hesse

Eva Hesse, Accession II 1968

Repetition in Post-Minimalism

Works by post-minimalist, Eva Hesse, are particularly interesting to those who have a base knowledge of contemporary art history. The works are considered post-minimal because of their close relationship to minimalism. Yet, where a minimalist cube is typically a sleek, closed form that praises the true essence of material purity - Hesse's cube turns that notion on its head. Hesse creates Accession II, an open cube, brimming with texture through interior rows of tubing that complicate its clean, exterior sensibility. Most of her work questions, what is minimalism? What is its opposite? Or with her piece titled Hang Up, she challenges what is a sculpture vs a painting?

Mike Kelley

Mike Kelley, More Love Hours Than Can Ever Be Repaid and The Wages of Sin, 1987.

Repetition in Poetic Assemblage

While this piece may not be as striking as some of the others visually, it has a very profound meaning. The title "More Love Hours Than Can Ever Be Repaid" explains the concept behind the piece, which is composed of hand-made blankets, quilts and plushy stuffed animals. If each item in the assemblage were made by hand, the hours behind this labor of love could never be repaid.

Mike Kelley, Kandors, 1999 - 2001

Repetition in Repression

“Repressed memories called into art” is a common theme throughout Mike Kelley's body of work. Kelley held a mild interest in the Superman mythos, what was of greater interest to him was the comic's lack of consistency when illustrating Superman's birthplace and hometown, the bottled city of Kandor. Drastic changes in scale, urban continuity and formal properties such as building type and architectural style can be seen from comic to comic – all variants attributed to the diverse hands of pencilers and colorists detailing and abstracting Kandor over the span of Superman's existence (from the 1930s to present-day).

Kelley explained, “Kandor functions for Superman as a perpetual reminder of his inability to escape the past and his alienated relationship to his present world.” Kandor relates to Kelley's exploration of memory, trauma and repression. “Kandor as an eternally maintained but consistently reconfigured relic of Superman's childhood” acts as symbol for Kelley's interest in vague memory or repressed memory syndrome. Taking a further look at this repetition and noting Kelley’s interest in Freud, we might also decipher Kelley's repetition of Kandor as a way of dealing with trauma, to reenact a certain scene over and over in order to take anxiety away from it.





Andy Goldsworthy

Andy Goldsworthy, Rowan Leaves Laid Around a Hole, 1987

Repetition in Site Specific / Land Art

Andy Goldsworthy, the British sculptor, photographer and environmentalist, is the single best-known environmental land artist of all time. He is particularly tenacious due to the self-prescribed parameters of his works. Goldsworthy makes site specific works, only using natural objects from his environment - meaning no outside tools, thread, glue and the like. The artist resorts to careful balancing, and often uses only his bare hands, teeth, and found tools to prepare and arrange the materials. In fact, Goldsworthy is credited as the founder of modern rock balancing (and for those of you who have tried it, you know how difficult it is!)

"I think it's incredibly brave to be working with flowers and leaves and petals. But I have to: I can't edit the materials I work with. My remit is to work with nature as a whole." - Andy Goldsworthy

Christo and Jeanne-Claude

Christo und Jeanne-Claude Umbrella Project (Japan) 1991

Repetition in Environmental Art

From October 9, 1991 for a period of eighteen days, The Umbrellas were installed in Japan to be seen and enjoyed by the public. Christo and Jeanne-Claude's 26 million dollar temporary work of art was entirely financed by the artists through their The Umbrellas, Joint Project for Japan and U.S.A. Corporation. The pair of artists are best known for their environmental works that span great distances in populated landscapes, both rural and urban. They make these intense, year-long pieces to create works of art for joy and beauty. An alternative reason the couple gave for making this work is to create new ways of seeing familiar landscapes.

Do-Ho Suh

Do-Ho Suh, Public Figures, 2001

Repetition in Public Sculpture

Just looking at this sculpture what might you think the artist is commenting on regarding public monuments? What is unusual about this public monument? Typically, public monuments honor a sole hero among men who stands triumphantly on the pedestal. Instead, Suh shows gratitude for the thousands of men and women who help better their country and make victory possible.

"Let’s say there’s one statue at the plaza of a hero who helped or protected our country—there are hundreds of thousands of individuals who helped him, and there’s no recognition for them." — Do-Ho Suh





Subodh Gupta

Subodh Gupta, Very Hungry God, 2006

Repetition in Activism

This work is incredibly poignant and moving, as proven by its genesis story. The piece was originally intended to be shown in a church in Barbes on the outskirts of Paris which is largely inhabited by an immigrant population. The work was made in response to the stories Gupta read in the news about how soup kitchens in Paris were serving food with pork so that Muslims would not eat it. With this information, Gupta went on to serve vegetarian meals outside the church from hundreds of stainless steel containers. He then went on to use the pots and pans to build this remarkable art piece, Very Hungry God.

"Outside the church I served vegetarian daal soup as a form of “prasad” (in India when you go to a temple or a guduwara you are offered food with the blessing)." - Subodh Gupta

Jean Shin

Jean Shin Chance City, 2001 - 2009

Repetition in Social Commentary

Jean Shin is a contemporary artist working with ubiquitous discarded and re-purposed objects. Her piece Chance City took roughly nine years to create because it relied on the collection of thousands of un-won lottery tickets. Chance City is a fragile existence, composed of $32,404 worth of discarded "Scratch & Win" losing lottery tickets built up as a house of cards. The construction is an urban landscape mirroring the thousands of hopes placed on the now discarded scratch-and-win lottery tickets.





Aurora Robson

Aurora Robson The Great Indoors, 2008

Repetition in Environmental Conservation

Aurora Robson's entire artistic practice is based off intercepting the waste stream, from urban environemts to the polluted ocean. Robson pays the unemployed and homeless to help clean and collect the plastic debris used in her work, helping her community in more than one way. Robson used more than 15,000 discarded plastic bottles and plastic debris in her massive installation, The Great Indoors, a landscape based loosely on microscopic imagery of the human body. The installation is entirely environmentally friendly, composed of her collected debris tinted polycrylic and illuminated by solar powered LEDs.

The Great Indoors is a landscape and a living organism. There’s an internal wilderness in action as we speak.” - Aurora Robson

El Anatsui

El Anatsui, Earth’s Skin, 2007. Aluminum and copper wire, 177 x 394 in.

Repetition in Globalization

El Anatsui's source material of aluminum waste and bottle-topsreferences consumption, globalization and cosmopolitanism. El Anatsui's iconic “bottle-top installations" are large-scale assemblages made from aluminum and bottle-tops sewn together with copper wire, composing metallic cloth-like wall hangings and sculptures. Customary in capitalism's wake, Anatsui looks to consumerism and waste brought on by colonialism and globalization in his works.

I thought of the objects as links between my continent, Africa, and the rest of Europe. Objects such as these were introduced to Africa by Europeans when they came as traders. Alcohol was one of the commodities they brought with them to exchange for goods in Africa... I thought that the bottle caps had a strong reference to the history of Africa.”
I am changing the meaning of bottle caps. Metaphorically I am working with the lifting of spirits.” “Sourced from a distillery in Nigeria, the bottle caps refer to the prevalence of liquor in West Africa, an industry that grew with colonialism in the Americas.”
- El Anatsui

Elana Herzog

Elana Herzog, Civilization and its Discontents, 2003

Repetition in Demise

Elana Herzog's work is characterized by the demise of carpets and rugs by means of stapling sections of the rug directly to gallery walls within each installation. The subject matter is common place, found in every corner of the world, while varied in value, spanning from the top designer rugs to those that can be found at Walmart. The rug is a material that connects us as people in all societies and civilizations. Herzog's deconstruction of Persian rugs and carpets began in early 2003, as the U.S. was preparing to invade Iraq. The patterns of the carpets utilized were based on the image of an Afghan War rug made in the 1980’s.

Tara Donovan

Tara Donovan, untiUntitled14

Repetition in Ubiquitous Materials

Tara Donovan transforms the ubiquitous and the mundane, using common place objects such as toothpicks, straws, styrofoam cups, scotch tape and index cards to create awe-inspiring works through the process of accumulation. The landscapes created from repeated forms transform the object until it can no longer be recognized.

Jennifer Angus

Repetition in the Unexpected

Don't freak out! These insects are long dead (and have died of natural causes), so we can enjoy these bizarre and beautiful intricate patterns, even when they give us the occasional jitters!

Jennifer Angus has been working with insects for over a decade. Her art involves pinning thousands of exotic dried insects to gallery walls in visually dynamic patterns and designs. The species in this installation are not endangered, they are quite abundant, primarily in Malaysia, Thailand, and Papua New Guinea.

Chakaia Booker

Chakaia Booker, Brick House, 2015

Repetition in the Urban Landscape

It seems artists are always looking for inspiration, when other times it just finds them. According to artist Chakaia Booker, she was first inspired to explore tires as a material while walking the streets of New York in the 1980s where this source material littered the urban landscape. These discarded tires and melted pools or rubber seemed promising to her, and she's been composing incredible works from rubber tires ever since!

Booker's Brick House can be found on Chicago's elevated trail, the 606, at Damen. Millennium Park is also exhibiting six recent sculptures Booker in a new exhibition in the Boeing Galleries - running now through April 2018.




Cover Image Credit: Chakaia Booker 2015

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Banksy's Art Affects Society In Remarkable Ways

It is so important to be one's own type of beautiful despite what others may think.

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Plastered on an old brick wall in a random location in Los Angeles, is one of the most moving pieces of graffiti. Its name is "Nobody Likes Me". The simplicity of Banksy's art adds to its mystique. A little boy, maybe age seven or eight, in green, is pictured crying. Above him, identical to an Instagram post is an image that reveals why he is sad: he has zero likes, followers, or comments. A flurry of questions fills the minds of the curious people who observe him. Are boys this age even allowed to have an Instagram? What does this image say about the next generation of children influenced by social media? Is social media a form of validation?

Every day, hundreds of people walk by this graffitied little boy. Some of them taking pictures of him, or many others walking by ignoring him. Every day sunrise and sunset passes by, as the image looks out onto the busy city people. People from all different kinds of backgrounds see him. Sometimes: old, young, black, white, gay, straight. Not many people understand. A person is a person and all he knows is that he is desperate for someone to understand him. That's what Banksy wants. The art is not for anyone in specific, but rather for anyone who can try to understand.

Banksy's art isn't a form of rebellion. It isn't an attempt to ruin any pieces of property. His intentions are completely pure: he wants people to understand his messages and take something away from it. A lot of times this piece of art is invisible to people. Rarely do people walk up to the graffiti and contemplate why the little boy is upset. Some people don't even see him. A lot of older generations don't understand him. Banksy probably hopes that the minds of the people passed by being challenged. Although Banksy knows the meaning of his art, as any artist wishes, can get someone thinking.

A lot of the older people that see the little boy probably associate the graffiti with trouble. Graffiti is a lot more than that though. If more people were to take notice of this art form and try to understand the meaning behind it, then maybe more people would be aware of the effect that social media has on our generation, and generations to come. Social media is an uncomfortable topic for a lot of people. With the fame of Instagram models rising, this tends to set the standard of beauty for so many young girls. For a lot of women and girls who do not look like these perfectly sculpted women, begin to hate their appearance. This is what the little graffiti boy challenges.

Banksy is using this little boy to get a major societal point across. It is clear that the artist is voicing his opinions about how social media affects all of our lives. This became evident to me when I saw other observers capturing the little boy with their phone cameras instead of enjoying the art. It is very ironic that so many people take a picture of the little boy and post it right back onto Instagram, in order to gain likes and comments.

When I went to see the little boy, there weren't a lot of people there. Once other people began noticing my boyfriend and I admire the art, some of them began coming by to observe as well. It is sad that more people don't notice this art, and honestly, I was extremely shocked that it wasn't busier. The image is beautiful and carries so much meaning. The piece of art begs for people to appreciate and more importantly understand it.

The image's meaning is so beautifully conveyed. With social media being so important to so many people, it begins to influence our happiness. The little boy's title even speaks volumes about what the image means. It is a double entendre that explains that if no one "likes" your post on Instagram, people may not like you in real life. Sadly, so many millennials feel this way. The meaning of the little boy to me is that it is okay to not be "liked" on Instagram. It is okay to post things that are beautiful to you, and not conform to the ideas that mainstream Instagramers post.

Banksy has done such a beautiful job on addressing major societal issues through his street art. The little boy says so much about the society that we all live in, and it makes a lot of people think twice about the message behind the art. Banksy is an amazing artist who is challenging social norms. The world truly needs more artists like him. The little boy shows us that we can live a happy and successful life without conforming to what social media tells us we have to be like. I believe that messages, like the little boy portrays, are so important for the younger generations. It is so important to be one's own type of beautiful despite what others may think. This is why I think that Banksy did an outstanding job of portraying this idea through the little boy.

Banksy's work can be found here.

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