Places Where Reality Feels Altered

Places Where Reality Feels Altered

What are your "liminal spaces?"
24809
views

Have you ever been somewhere and felt, for no reason, confused or a little “off?” Like you’re waiting for something to happen, but you have no idea what it is? These places can make you feel uncomfortable, anxious, or they can spark new ideas and increase creativity.

Some of these places are called "liminal spaces." Take a look at a few examples, and see if you recognize or remember those feelings.

Playgrounds at night

Deep in the middle of the mountains or forest

Abandoned stores

Bathrooms at concert venues

Waiting rooms

Hospitals at midnight

School buildings during the summer break

Empty warehouses

Laundromats at night

Your friend’s house during a sleepover, when you’re the only one awake

Stairwells

Empty, silent museums

Rooftops at dawn or dusk

Early in the morning somewhere the snow is untouched

Airports late at night or early in the morning

Inside a dark closet


“Liminal” means “relating to a transitional stage” or “occupying a position at both sides of a boundary."

Liminal spaces, such as waiting rooms, parking lots, stairwells and rest stops, make you feel weird if you spend too much time in them because these spaces exist for the things that come before or after them. Their "existence" is not about themselves. Beyond the place you’re coming from and/or going to, the liminal space isn’t really meant to be its own entity, so you feel weird and the space feels odd if you spend too much time or think too much about them. Your brain tells you that something’s wrong because you’re supposed to continue moving on in life, but you’re not, so it feels like reality is altered.

Along with liminal spaces, there are other places where your brain gets confused and reality feels offset. Our brains rely on context in order to make sense of the world, and when you’re in a situation or place that’s out of context, it creates a sense of discomfort and/or anxiety.

For example, walking around a school building when school’s out of session, abandoned stores, empty buildings, or being awake when everyone else is asleep, we’re experiencing these locations out of context. We associate a high school with being crowded and noisy, so walking through the empty halls takes the place out of context, and your brain is saying, “Oh no, this isn’t right. You need to get out of here immediately." Brains like familiar situations, so when you’re in a place where the brain has already established a context, but it’s wrong, so that part of the brain starts to feel like it must be dangerous, hence the feeling of anxiety. Meanwhile, the logical part of our brain says, “Relax, it’s just an empty building," so you don’t go into a fight or flight response, you just feel uneasy.

Many people say that being in a liminal space or in a place that's out of context can increase your creativity, so maybe the next time you're around one of these weird places or get that weird feeling... stick around.

Cover Image Credit: Wordpress

Popular Right Now

Sorry Not Sorry, My Parents Paid For My Coachella Trip

No haters are going to bring me down.
182816
views

This piece is intended to be a satire of an experience at Coachella.

With Coachella officially over, lives can go back to normal and we can all relive Beyonce’s performance online for years to come. Or, if you were like me and actually there, you can replay the experience in your mind for the rest of your life, holding dear to the memories of an epic weekend and a cultural experience like no other on the planet.

And I want to be clear about the Beyonce show: it really was that good.

But with any big event beloved by many, there will always be the haters on the other side. The #nochella’s, the haters of all things ‘Chella fashion. And let me just say this, the flower headbands aren’t cultural appropriation, they’re simply items of clothing used to express the stylistic tendency of a fashion-forward event.

Because yes, the music, and sure, the art, but so much of what Coachella is, really, is about the fashion and what you and your friends are wearing. It's supposed to be fun, not political! Anyway, back to the main point of this.

One of the biggest things people love to hate on about Coachella is the fact that many of the attendees have their tickets bought for them by their parents.

Sorry? It’s not my fault that my parents have enough money to buy their daughter and her friends the gift of going to one of the most amazing melting pots of all things weird and beautiful. It’s not my fault about your life, and it’s none of your business about mine.

All my life, I’ve dealt with people commenting on me, mostly liking, but there are always a few that seem upset about the way I live my life.

One time, I was riding my dolphin out in Turks and Cacaos, (“riding” is the act of holding onto their fin as they swim and you sort of glide next to them. It’s a beautiful, transformative experience between human and animal and I really think, when I looked in my dolphin’s eye, that we made a connection that will last forever) and someone I knew threw shade my way for getting to do it.

Don’t make me be the bad guy.

I felt shame for years after my 16th birthday, where my parents got me an Escalade. People at school made fun of me (especially after I drove into a ditch...oops!) and said I didn’t deserve the things I got in life.

I can think of a lot of people who probably don't deserve the things in life that they get, but you don't hear me hating on them (that's why we vote, people). Well, I’m sick of being made to feel guilty about the luxuries I’m given, because they’ve made me who I am, and I love me.

I’m a good person.

I’m not going to let the Coachella haters bring me down anymore. Did my parents buy my ticket and VIP housing? Yes. Am I sorry about that? Absolutely not.

Sorry, not sorry!

Cover Image Credit: Kaitlin Harasta

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

6 Characteristics A Good Baking Mentor Should Possess

Make sure that your teacher is an open-minded person who is ready to listen to your grievances and queries
352
views

Baking is an art but teaching it requires a lot of patience and positivity. You might be a skilled baker but that doesn’t mean that you can be a great teacher as well. This is why it is important that you choose a good mentor for yourself when you are learning how to bake else you would end up bad baking results.

How do you select the right teacher for yourself? What characteristics or qualifications should you look out for?

Don’t worry, we have listed down a few characteristics that you should look out for when choosing the perfect teacher for yourself.

1. Great organizational skills

One of the most important qualities of a good baking teacher is how to lead the students and carry out their baking class. A good teacher will have the whole baking class outlined which will include specific timing for theory and hands-on session to train the students properly. They would also account any issues that might arise during the class and how to deal with them efficiently.

2. Patient and motivating

New bakers in training often make mistakes or are to slow to understand the instruction which is why a good teacher will need to be patient with them. If you choose a highly-qualified teacher who is impatient and always criticising then you are likely to give up the baking class and maybe never get back into it as a career too. This is why it is extremely important that you find a teacher who will be patient and motivating and will explain to you things gently without getting frustrated easily.

3. Highly-trained and qualified

Of course, a teacher needs to be properly qualified in order to teach you the subject so make sure that you choose a teacher who has the necessary baking qualifications and certifications. While you can choose a teacher without the diploma or certifications in baking and cake decoration courses, it is likely that you would get a more thorough training if you do. So, check out their educational background before you start taking classes with them.

4. Good communicator

Another important quality of a good teacher is to be able to communicate their thoughts clearly to the students, so that it's easy for them to understand. If a teacher is not able to communicate the recipe properly or isn’t able to share the baking tips with you then the complete class would turn out to be an utter waste of your time. So, make sure that you choose a teacher who has good speaking skills and is able to efficiently get their point across to the students.

5. Creative and inspiring

No one feels inspired by a boring, monotonous class with the teacher droning on or following the same class schedule every day. This holds particularly true for bakers as they need some inspiration to bake new and innovative things. If your teacher lacks the creativity and always follows the course rules then you are less likely to enjoy their class. On the other hand, if your teacher is always bringing something new to the table and motivates the students to use their own imagination then you are more likely to feel inspired to bake.

6. Ready to listen

Finally, make sure that your teacher is an open-minded person who is ready to listen to your grievances and queries. You don’t want to learn from a teacher who won’t listen to your ideas or answer your queries as this will be counter-productive to your learning. Make sure you choose a teacher who will be supportive and helpful and will always clear your doubts so that you can be properly trained.

Cover Image Credit: Pexels

Related Content

Facebook Comments