Inside The World Of Cosmetic Animal Testing

Inside The World Of Cosmetic Animal Testing

It is a much more murky world than you might think.

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Testing of cosmetics on animals has been a highly charged, ethical issue that has risen in prominence during the past couple of decades. While a common practice tracing back all the way to the early 20th century, the testing of products commonly used like shampoos, conditioners, makeup, and even face masks have been tested or contain ingredients tested on animals. With a recent rise in backlash, certain companies have made a point to take a stand against the testing of products on animals due to the physical and mental harm that has been documented during these animal testing practices.

The aim of cosmetic testing is often used to test the efficacy of hypoallergenic properties or safety for use by humans, and the laws regarding cosmetic testing vary widely from country to country. For example, in China, animal testing is mandatory, even for products that are imported into the country. However, in the European Union, a ban went into effect in 2013 against animal testing for cosmetics and marketing of cosmetics tested on animals. In other countries additionally, there are various approaches to this issue that vary widely.

Due to the high controversy surrounding the issue, many companies' marketing policies and their product sales have been affected by whether they participate in animal testing or not. Companies like Lush, ELF, and The Body Shop all market their products as cruelty-free: even going so far as to make the company's anti-animal testing trend a point in their marketing strategy. Due to the popularity of the anti-animal testing stance, drawing on ethical and humane inclinations, the brands, in general, have gained notoriety and achieved a more "feel-good" aura surrounding their brand.

However, the danger of advertising, especially in the United States, is that oftentimes the laws are extremely vague and unregulated. The words "cruelty-free" and "not tested on animals" is not regulated by the FDA, causing many people to assume that the product they are buying is cruelty-free when really, only a single ingredient is cruelty-free, or the company itself has "cruelty-free" practices. Many of times, while technically following advertising and FDA guidelines, companies could be misleading with their marketing strategies. Whether you support animal testing or not, this misinterpretation of many advertisements that specific products are marketed in is dangerous.

With advertising slowly becoming its own entity within the global commerce sector, it is more and more vital to pay attention to what you are buying and the money that you put your products to. Advertising affects us in many subliminal ways, and being more cognizant of how the ads you see affect the way you think and additionally take every claim with a grain of salt. It is our responsibility to do our own research, and looking into issues that you believe in and consider important and shopping along those guidelines can help you live a life that supports your values.

For animal testing, a good rule of thumb is due to Chinese trade policies, if a product is sold in China, then animal testing was conducted in some part of the manufacturing process. It is up to us not to blindly take claims of advertisements, but to vote with our dollar and give our business to the companies that we believe in.

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I Am A College Student, And I Think Free Tuition Is Unfair To Everyone Who's Already Paid For It

Stop expecting others to pay for you.

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I attend Fordham University, a private university in the Bronx.

I commute to school because I can't afford to take out more loans than I already do.

Granted, I've received scholarships because of my grades, but they don't cover my whole tuition. I am nineteen years old and I have already amassed the debt of a 40-year-old. I work part-time and the money I make covers the bills I have to pay. I come from a middle-class family, but my dad can't afford to pay off my college loans.

I'm not complaining because I want my dad to pay my loans off for me; rather I am complaining because while my dad can't pay my loans off (which, believe me, he wants too), he's about to start paying off someone else's.

During the election, Bernie frequently advocated for free college.

Now, if he knew enough about economics he would know it simply isn't feasible. Luckily for him, he is seeing his plan enacted by Cuomo in NY. Cuomo has just announced that in NY, state public college will be free.

Before we go any further, it's important to understand what 'free' means.

Nothing is free; every single government program is paid for by the taxpayers. If you don't make enough to have to pay taxes, then something like this doesn't bother you. If you live off welfare and don't pay taxes, then something like this doesn't bother you. When someone offers someone something free, it's easy to take it, like it, and advocate for it, simply because you are not the one paying for it.

Cuomo's free college plan will cost $163,000,000 in the first year (Did that take your breath away too?). Now, in order to pay for this, NY state will increase their spending on higher education to cover these costs. Putting two and two together, if the state decides to raise their budget, they need money. If they need money they look to the taxpayers. The taxpayers are now forced to foot the bill for this program.

I think education is extremely important and useful.

However, my feelings on the importance of education does not mean that I think it should be free. Is college expensive? Yes -- but more so for private universities. Public universities like SUNY Cortland cost around $6,470 per year for in-state residents. That is still significantly less than one of my loans for one semester.

I've been told that maybe I shouldn't have picked a private university, but like I said, I believe education is important. I want to take advantage of the education this country offers, and so I am going to choose the best university I could, which is how I ended up at Fordham. I am not knocking public universities, they are fine institutions, they are just not for me.

My problems with this new legislation lie in the following: Nowhere are there any provisions that force the student receiving aid to have a part-time job.

I work part-time, my sister works part-time, and plenty of my friends work part-time. Working and going to school is stressful, but I do it because I need money. I need money to pay my loans off and buy my textbooks, among other things. The reason I need money is because my parents can't afford to pay off my loans and textbooks as well as both of my sisters'. There is absolutely no reason why every student who will be receiving aid is not forced to have a part-time job, whether it be working in the school library or waitressing.

We are setting up these young adults up for failure, allowing them to think someone else will always be there to foot their bills. It's ridiculous. What bothers me the most, though, is that my dad has to pay for this. Not only my dad, but plenty of senior citizens who don't even have kids, among everyone else.

The cost of living is only going up, yet paychecks rarely do the same. Further taxation is not a solution. The point of free college is to help young adults join the workforce and better our economy; however, people my parents' age are also needed to help better our economy. How are they supposed to do so when they can't spend their money because they are too busy paying taxes?

Free college is not free, the same way free healthcare isn't free.

There is only so much more the taxpayers can take. So to all the students about to get free college: get a part-time job, take personal responsibility, and take out a loan — just like the rest of us do. The world isn't going to coddle you much longer, so start acting like an adult.

Cover Image Credit: https://timedotcom.files.wordpress.com/2017/04/free-college-new-york-state.jpg?quality=85

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A Little Skepticism Goes A Long Way

Be informed citizens and verify what you see and hear.

rahma
rahma
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These days more than ever before we are being bombarded constantly by a lot of news and information, a considerable amount of which is inaccurate. Sometimes there's an agenda behind it to mislead people and other times its just rumors or distortion of the facts. So, how do you sift through all this and get accurate information? How can you avoid being misled or brainwashed?

This is an important topic because the decisions each of us make can affect others. And if you are a responsible citizen your decisions can affect large numbers of people, hopefully positively, but negatively as well.

It's been said that common sense is not something that can be taught, but I am going to disagree. I think with the right training, teaching the fundamentals behind common sense can get people to have a better sense of what it is and start practicing it. All you will need is to improve your general knowledge and gain some experience, college is a good place for that, then add a little skepticism and you are on your way to start making sensible decisions.

One of the fundamental things to remember is not to believe a statement at face value, you must first verify. Even if you believe it's from a trusted source, they may have gotten their info from a questionable one. There's a saying that journalists like to use: "if your mother said, 'I love you' you should verify it.'" While this is taking it a bit too far, you get the idea.

If you feel that something is not adding up, or doesn't make sense then you are probably right. This is all the more reason to check something out further. In the past, if someone showed a picture or video of something that was sufficient proof. But nowadays with so many videos and picture editing software, it would have to go through more verification to prove its authenticity. That's not the case with everything but that's something that often needs to be done.

One way of checking if something sounds fishy is to look at all the parties involved and what do they have to gain and lose. This sometimes is easier to use when you're dealing with a politics-related issue, but it can work for other things where more than one person/group is involved. For example, most people and countries as well will not do something that is self-destructive, so if one party is accusing the other of doing something self-destructive or disadvantageous then it's likely that there is something inaccurate about the account. Perhaps the accusing party is setting the other one up or trying to gain some praise they don't deserve.

A lot of times all it takes is a little skepticism and some digging to get to the truth. So please don't be that one which retweets rumors or helps spread misinformation. Verify before you report it.

rahma
rahma

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