good resume example

Here's How To Properly Build A Résumé In 9 Steps

Spoiler alert: it's not as hard as you make it out to be.

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Applying to jobs is one of the most nerve-racking things you could do. Your whole life depends on them, for better or worse. To add to the stress, no one seems to know exactly how to format their résumé properly for employers. Well, fear no more.

Here is how to create a perfect résumé:

1. Have your name clear and large at the top.

Larissa Hamblin

Don't leave an employer guessing what your name is. Make it large and in charge. And I hate to even say this, but make sure your name is spelled correctly. I shouldn't even have to say that, but you'd be surprised...

2. Have an abstract.

Explain who you are, what your ambitions include and what your goals are in life. List some of the most relevant traits you have for a job to show an employer why you think you're a good fit.

3. Your work experience needs to be high and organized.

Larissa Hamblin

Explain what position you have, month and year you had the job, where you worked, in what city you worked, and at least three bullet points explaining what you did for the job.

4. Only include relevant experience.

If you're applying for an office job, don't include that you were once a server or grocery bagger. Possible employers do not care. You might think it shows them that you can handle multitasking or that you know how to be organized, but by this point in life, you should already know how to do both. Jobs only care about what you have done that directly pertains to the one you're applying for. Trust me on this!

5. List all your contact information.

Larissa Hamblin

I'm talking phone number, email, LinkedIn, website, online portfolio... whatever you have. You can even go as far and include your social media if you have created your social media to reflect your profession. If you're applying for a graphic design position and your social media is a feed of your work, then include that link! But if you're applying to be a veterinary technician and your Instagram is of you going out drinking every night, leave out that link and probably put your account on private.

6. Include your most relevant education history.

For me, it's that I went to the University of Central Florida located in Orlando, Florida, from 2015-2019 where I received a bachelor's degree in journalism. It's the only college I went to, and including my high school experience is not necessary. Know this for yourself, too.

7. List some skills at the very bottom.

Larissa Hamblin

At the bottom of my résumé, I include six of the most pertinent skills I have to jobs in journalism with levels included. I'll include a picture to show what I'm talking about. Not only does it look nice, but it's a creative touch to show that you're willing to go above and beyond in marketing yourself.

8. Offer relevant experience. 

If you didn't necessarily have a job at a specific company but still worked with them, show that. I use it as a way to include experience in the job field that I don't want to take off my résumé but isn't the information I want an employer to see first. For example, I include being an intern for Orlando Weekly, CNN, Central Florida Lifestyle Magazine and WKMG, and president of Odyssey in my work experience. In my relevant experience, I include that I was an editor and reporter for my school paper, in addition to being in a journalism club on campus. They are important things to note, but they're not the most important things I've done.

9. Make your résumé reflect who you are.

Bram Naus

My resume has a soft greyish purple coloring with slate black text. It shows that I'm professional while also not afraid to show a little of my preferred color palette. I chose a type that is sleek and easily legible while being more fun than Times New Roman. Choose what you think looks good and reflects your style, while still being appropriate for a work environment.

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The Stress Of Applying For Internships, As Told By The Cast Of 'New Girl'

Sometimes the hiring companies need Schmidt's Douche Bag Jar.

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Many college students are applying to summer internships and getting their foot in the professional world. We all know what it feels like to apply for a job. Each student knows the struggles that come along with applying for internships. The hardest part is applying for an internship that wants experience in the field, and you are thinking to yourself, "What? This is the experience I need!" The characters of "New Girl" perfectly express the process of applying to internships.

1. "Must be ___ major to apply."

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I personally think that your major should have something to do with the field you may want to go into. However, it sucks that some students can't even apply to certain internships even though you may be qualified besides that one criterion.

2. "Must be a rising senior."

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Are you serious? That is not fair! Those who aren't rising seniors still need internships. Yeah, I get that the company may want to hire the internship after the summer for a full-time position, but why not a sophomore or junior?

3. "Include your resume."

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Yeah, creating a resume can be difficult and overwhelming. What do I add to experience if this my first time applying to internships? Do I need a simple or fancy resume? Does it need to be on that thick shiny paper or is normal paper fine? Do companies actually read my resume when I submit it or email it?

4. Price of summer internship

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Is the internship worth not goofing around all summer with your best friends and staying up late? Will it be too overwhelming? Will I actually gain experience or will it just stress me out?

5. "Unpaid"

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Uhhhhh, no. I will not accept an internship that does not pay me. You shouldn't either! It is a joke and absolutely not worth the job!

6. *No Response*

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Getting nothing back from a company you applied to is the worst. It is actually worse than getting that rejection email. You put all this energy into researching and applying to the internship for the company to not reply. It is rude and makes life feel crappy.

7. "We'd like to set up a time for an interview."

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It worked! Your hard work paid off and you got the interview. Now the process isn't quite over but it is looking a lot better.

Now it is time for the interview. The interview can be a scary phase but you got this! The hard work is over now. An interview is basically a professional first date! Some are bad, some are great, and the others are in between. If the company does not choose you as their next summer intern, the cycle starts over again with applying. It may seem endless, but you got this!

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What I've Learned From Working At Subway

Getting a job is life changing and can help you in ways you didn't even know

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Okay, everyone has a job, right? Do you remember your first job? How did that job impact you? Did you befriend coworkers? Do you still talk to them and hang out? Did you tell them everything about you? Ask them for advice? Vent to them about something?

Most people get their first job at around 18 years old when they're in high school. During that time I was playing soccer and we either had a game or practice every day after school. Going in for the interview I was beyond nervous, I didn't really know what to expect. When it came time for my first day I was beyond nervous once again. I wasn't sure how I was going to do or what to expect from the other workers. However, I will say that I feel like it has helped me a lot.

At first, I was kind of shy, which is how I always am when I am in a new place with people I don't know. I wasn't sure if I was going to like my coworkers or if they were going to like me. It did take a while for me to open up completely.

After a while, we all got to know each other and I feel like we became friends. For me, they became my second family, okay third family. Granted we all didn't get along at first, but we did kind of have to get along because we are so small. We all see each other every day, even if we don't work with each other that day.

Thanks to getting a job at Subway, I've had to learn how to work with making sandwiches yes, but also how to interact with the customers. And by that I mean, we get a lot of different kinds of customers and we have to know how to deal with them accordingly. I have had people get mad at me for the prices changing, discontinued sandwiches, discontinued bread, coupons, and more.

I have been able to handle customers without getting upset about what they're complaining about. Which has allowed me to get a better understanding of what people who work fast food and customer service goes through. It has shown me to have patience when it comes to waiting in a long line for food. The workers are trying their best to get to you.

I've gotten more confident in my work and in my personal life as well.

My coworkers have helped me a lot in my life. I didn't drive when I first started driving, but I was starting to think about getting it and they encouraged me to go for it. They also helped me when I was scared and nervous about actually doing for the test itself. They also helped me ask my boyfriend out, they were there when I was confused about it all and told me that I should just go for it and not be scared about the outcome.

I was also able to buy a car as well as go to concerts. One of my coworkers is always getting tickets and inviting me to tag along, it's a lot of fun being able to go with her. We are always laughing and talking with each other, yes we have had days where we don't talk to each other but we end up making up at the end of the night or during out next shift together.

Working at Subway has helped me in ways I didn't know I needed help with. I've grown as a person since I started and I've made friends with my co-workers who also have helped me change.

It has allowed me to get the courage I needed to get my license and ask out the guy I like. My co-workers have become my friends that I talk to about everything and anything. If I'm frustrated an ok it something I vent to them. Being able to vent to my coworkers or just talk about something to either ask for advice or just to get it out is always helpful.

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