Ways To Be Lazy, Yet Effective From Day to Day

Ways To Be Lazy, Yet Effective From Day to Day

Believe or not, you can actually get things done without leaving your house!
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We have all had those days that we really just don't want to do anything. They typically consist of lounging around in sweats and eating Ramen or leftover pizza for all three meals. I usually finish a whole package of Oreos or Hot Cheetos during these days (or both depending on how gross I want to feel later on. These lazy days don't have to be completely worthless, believe it or not, you can actually get stuff done without leaving your house! Here are eight things you can do when you just really don't want to see the outside world.

1. Clean your room!

We all have that one chair that collects piles of clothes, shoes, trash, or basically whatever you don't feel like putting away. Instead of laying in your bed the whole day, go through that pile and sort it out! It will make your room look so much better and will give you somewhere to sit on other than your bed. You also may find something you thought you lost!

2. Catch up on school work.

It's easier to suggest doing work on a lazy day than actually doing it. To get motivated, plan on rewarding yourself once you finish your work. Also, turn the TV off while you are trying to get everything done, trust me it will improve your work and will get rid of any distractions.

3. Organize your pantry/ fridge.

Coming from someone who had a hobby of organizing her family's pantry when she was younger, I can tell you, this is actually a lot of fun. While doing this, throw out anything that is old or no one eats anymore. You really feel like your life is put together when your food is organized. Your pantry or fridge will end up looking a little bit like this:

4. Treat yo self.

Treat yo self! Nothing is better than taking a long, hot shower, putting on a face and hair mask, painting your nails, and finishing it all with a blowout while doing some online shopping. You will feel like a beautiful, clean goddess and your skin will be thanking you for the next few days.

5. Read a book.

Yes I know reading isn't everyone's favorite thing to do in this world, it's definitely not mine, but when you find the right book it's actually pretty fun. Plus you won't feel as bad for watching "A Real Housewives of New Jersey" marathon for eight hours straight if you follow it up with a book.

6. Workout!

No, you don't have to go to the gym to get a good workout! Get off the couch and get fit! There are plenty of easy at home workouts that you can find on Instagram, and you can even watch TV while doing most of them. The best part is, is that you don't even have to see anyone you know while getting all sweaty and gross! It's truly a "get the best of both worlds" to workout in the comfort of your own home.

7. Cook!

With your newly organized pantry and fridge, find something good to cook. You don't even have to be the best chef- no one is eating your food but you!

8. Call your grandma.

I know you probably haven't spoken to her in a while and nothing excites grandma's more than getting a random call from their grandchild. Don't you want to make your grandmother happy?


Cover Image Credit: cochal

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To The Parent Who Chose Addiction

Thank you for giving me a stronger bond with our family.

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views

When I was younger I resented you, I hated every ounce of you, and I used to question why God would give me a parent like you. Not now. Now I see the beauty and the blessings behind having an addict for a parent. If you're reading this, it isn't meant to hurt you, but rather to thank you.

Thank you for choosing your addiction over me.

Throughout my life, you have always chosen the addiction over my programs, my swim meets or even a simple movie night. You joke about it now or act as if I never questioned if you would wake up the next morning from your pill and alcohol-induced sleep, but I thank you for this. I thank you because I gained a relationship with God. The amount of time I spent praying for you strengthened our relationship in ways I could never explain.

SEE ALSO: They're Not Junkies, You're Just Uneducated

Thank you for giving me a stronger bond with our family.

The amount of hurt and disappointment our family has gone through has brought us closer together. I have a relationship with Nanny and Pop that would never be as strong as it is today if you had been in the picture from day one. That in itself is a blessing.

Thank you for showing me how to love.

From your absence, I have learned how to love unconditionally. I want you to know that even though you weren't here, I love you most of all. No matter the amount of heartbreak, tears, and pain I've felt, you will always be my greatest love.

Thank you for making me strong.

Thank you for leaving and for showing me how to be independent. From you, I have learned that I do not need anyone else to prove to me that I am worthy of being loved. From you, I have learned that life is always hard, but you shouldn't give into the things that make you feel good for a short while, but should search for the real happiness in life.

Most of all, thank you for showing me how to turn my hurt into motivation.

I have learned that the cycle of addiction is not something that will continue into my life. You have hurt me more than anyone, but through that hurt, I have pushed myself to become the best version of myself.

Thank you for choosing the addiction over me because you've made me stronger, wiser, and loving than I ever could've been before.

Cover Image Credit: http://crashingintolove.tumblr.com/post/62246881826/pieffysessanta-tumblr-com

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Batter Up

Because someone needed to teach her rotten boyfriend a lesson about how to treat a woman.

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views

I have this memory from when I was younger,

I must have been six, maybe seven? An age

When you can remember, but not quite

Understand. I remember the landline

Ringing sometime in the middle

Of the night in my grandmother's small,

But adequate house. I had been sleeping,

Tucked under a shield of satin covers,

My grandmother next to me, blanketless,

And stiff, on the very edge of the queen mattress

Like she was anticipating some sort of disaster.

It wasn't the phone that pulled me from my sleep,

It was my grandmother's instant jerk, her eyes

Flipping open quicker than a light switch,

The mattress springing back up, adjusting

To the new lightness as she fled the room. My waking

Was soft like a song. Slow and humane.

My eyes adjusting to the dark, my ears absorbing the ringing,

My mind reminding itself that I was at my grandmother's house.


Then, the ringing stopped;

Abrupt, like a disarmed fire alarm.

It was just a drill, I thought.

But, then I heard the mumbling

From behind the door, panicked mumbling.

Rapid, like gunfire. My grandmother's Rs

Rolling down the hallway and under the door crack.

She only spoke Spanish when she was angry.


The call ended, my grandmother returned to the room,

Wrapped me in a blanket, and carried me into the night.

She buckled me into the backseat of her Toyota and said,

We were going to Auntie Mandy's house because someone

Needed to teach her rotten boyfriend a lesson about how to treat

A woman.


When we arrived at the house, we found the front door

Wide open, the house lights spilling out onto the porch.

A truck, I had seen once before, was parked a foot away

From the front door, aggressive. The truck had trampled

Over the dandelions and daisies, which lay wounded

In the front yard. A scene that begged for investigation.


My grandmother told me to stay put in my seat.

I watched as she walked to the back of the car, her normally pretty

Face turned straight, looked masculine. I watched as she pulled

Something wooden out of her trunk, then in her feline walk,

Approached the house. She turned to me, and I saw the

Baseball bat, immense in her female hands.


I slouched in my seat, the window above my head.

I never saw her go into the house.


I don't remember how long I sat,

Until the red and blue lights came.

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