Are High School Reunions Still A Thing?

Are High School Reunions Still A Thing?

We've all seen our lives play out in real time on social media, so what's left to talk about?
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Let’s jump into it right out of the gate: high school reunions are sort of dumb. Perhaps in the dark ages prior to social media, it was intriguing to find out what people were up to ten or twenty years after you last saw one another. But these days, we just look on Facebook to see who got fat, had kids, got married, divorced, and all of that fun stuff. And let’s face it, all that “fun stuff” is why people show up to high school class reunions. Let’s pretend for a second that I am being overly cynical.

Let’s imagine that you moved away after high school and haven’t returned often to your hometown and also rebuke all forms of social media (but then how did they even find you to invite you?). Maybe it would be a nostalgic adventure to return to your beloved hometown and warmly “catch up” with all of those long-lost acquaintances. If this Pollyanna-esque reunion is what you have in mind, then I hope for your sake that your hometown is not like mine: a sweltering non-tropical opposite-of-an-oasis kind of place. Don’t get me wrong, I live less than an hour from my old high school; I’ve adjusted to the heat, my pool helps tremendously.

But why in god’s name would you decide to host a class reunion in the dead of summer? I’m sure most of those who did move away have never thought, “Gee, you know what would be great? Taking a trip to a place with triple digit weather and a lingering aroma of manure and make small talk with a bunch of people I know vaguely.” People who organize class reunions: maybe try to make it appealing? I just think if I’m going to spend an entire evening going over the same highlight reel I’ve seen on Facebook for the past ten years, I would like to at least not be dripping sweat. Is that really too much to ask?

Needless to say, I skipped my ten year reunion. But to be fair, it was the same weekend I was moving. And I didn’t really want to go. I’m sure no one missed me. Because a) the few people I still talk to weren’t going and b) many of my other classmates see my highlights on social media.

I’m sorry, but if I have to arrange for an all-night babysitter, drive nearly an hour, pay a five-star price tag for a dive bar buffet, spend all night awkwardly introducing my husband to people I only kind of know and repeat the same boring-ish story of the last decade of my life, then I only ask that it not be one hundred and thirteen goddamn degrees outside.No offense. Maybe I’ll see you all at the twenty-year. Don’t hold your breath.

I think there’s a reason we stay connected to some and not to others. I was neither homecoming queen nor a wallflower. I played some sports, I went to some parties. I ditched class with friends from time to time, and even went to those terrible parties with shitty beer out in fields and barns (I grew up in a fairly rural area). I was always kind of an outsider at heart, though. I was technically from the next town over, and most of classmates had known one another since birth.

That wasn’t my scene; to me, small towns are like comfort food: they can be great in small doses, but consumed daily and that shit will kill you, or just make you incredibly miserable. On occasion, I have ran into old classmates and it was fun to say hello for a few minutes. But I feel like if class reunions are to have any relevance moving forward, they have to do more than offer a superficial moment of socializing.

Invite us all to a football game and drinks after. I might go to that. Maybe a costume party with prizes? Now we’re talking. Draw the weird ones like myself back with something of interest. I promise it will make the night a lot more interesting.

Cover Image Credit: Racked

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Dear Mom, Now That I'm Older

A letter to the woman who made me the woman I am today.
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Dear Mom,

Now that I'm older, I definitely appreciate you a lot more than I did as a kid. I appreciate the little things, from the random text messages to constantly tagging me on Facebook in your "funny" photos and sending me pins of stuff I like on Pinterest. Now that I'm older, I can look back and realize that everything I am is all because of you. You've made me strong but realize it's okay to cry. You've shown me how a mother gives everything to her children to give them a better life than she had, even when she's left with nothing. And, most importantly you've taught me to never give up and without this, I would not be where I am today.

Mom, now that I'm older, I realize that you're the best friend I'm ever going to have. You cheer me on when I try new things and support me in deciding to be whatever person I want to be. Thank you for never telling me I can't do something and helping me figure out ways to be the best woman I can be. Your love for me is unconditional. They say true, unconditional love can only come from God, but mom, I think you're a pretty close second.

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Now that I'm older, I don't get to see you as much. But not seeing you as much just makes the times I do get to see you the absolute best, and I look forward to it every time. Now that I'm older, I'm not going to live at home. But, I promise to always come back because I know the door is always open. Your house is always going to be my home, and no other place is going to be the same.

Now that I'm older, I realize how much I miss you taking care of me. I miss you making me dinner, making sure I was doing well in school, and taking me to endless appointments. I miss you waking me up for school and then waking me up again because I didn't listen the first time.

But, Mom, now that I'm older, I can see all that you've done for me. I can look back and see how big of a brat I was but you still loved me (and let me live) anyways. I can understand why you did certain things and frankly, you're one bada** of a woman.

To have you as my mom and my best friend has been the best thing that has ever happened to me. So, Mom, now that I'm older, thank you, for everything.

Love,

Your Daughter

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Visiting Your Friends At Different Colleges Is Worth The Drive

Learning about the lives my friends are living at other schools is extremely interesting.

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When I went to college, many of my friends went to different schools. Some of us went to the same college, some went to other in-state schools and some even went out-of-state. If you are ever bored and are thinking about spending the weekend with your friend at their college, I recommend doing it!

As a student at the University of Florida, I already know the best places to eat, party and relax in Gainesville. During my time here, I have met so many new people and have experienced so many new things. But, sometimes I forget that my friends are living their own lives at different schools, as well.

When I went to visit one of my best friends at the University of Central Florida, it was neat to see how she matured as a person. She took me to all the cool bars, introduced me to all of her new friends and gave me a tour of campus. Getting to see how she has evolved so much was so fascinating.

Visiting my friends at Florida State University was a whole experience in itself. I had many friends go to this school. Each of them lives their own lives, some still hang out, and some are even roommates. The culture at each university is so much different than the culture at my school. It was fun to meet all of their new classmates and sorority sisters. Getting to know the people that spend every day with the friends that I used to spend every day with is something I love to do.

If you ever have a break from studying, get a little bored, or even just miss your friends, give them a call and ask to stay with them for the weekend! I promise you will learn so much more about them and how they are taking on their new phase of life.

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