What To Do When You Suffer From House Identity Crisis

What To Do When You Suffer From House Identity Crisis

Gryffindor or Slytherin? Gryffinclaw or Slytherpuff?
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When you're a Harry Potter fan, one of the most important things is which Hogwarts House you are part of. You have merchandise that bears your house colors, you get into arguments with fellow fans about which house is better, and you are fiercely loyal to the house that you are proud to call yours.

Unfortunately, it's not all fun and games. Not everyone feels like they fit into their house. With the Pottermore test, people who thought they belonged in one house were suddenly thrown into another. Of course, you could deny the result you get, but the questions, choices, and corresponding house results were written by J.K. Rowling herself. You don't want to go against that. My sister went from being a loyal Slytherin to being a Hufflepuff; a complete 180. Luckily, my sister merged nicely into her new house, and now proudly wears her Hufflepuff hoodie out whenever she can. But some people don't get so lucky.

Evanna Lynch, otherwise known as Luna "Loony" Lovegood, claimed Ravenclaw until the test placed her in Gryffindor; Ron Weasley himself was placed into Hufflepuff. It's very difficult to uproot yourself from one house to the other when you are so sure that you project the traits of the house you are loyal to. Another issue that arises is when you take the test multiple times, just to check, and get two different results. What then? What happens when you face a House Identity Crisis?

Obviously, don't panic. Remember that your house doesn't always define who you are. Peter Pettigrew was a spineless coward; Cedric Diggory and Nymphadora Tonks were the bravest Hufflepuffs the series ever introduces; Regulus Black willingly went against the Dark Lord, to stop him from creating more Horcruxes and extending his reign; and we can't forget Gildoroy Lockheart, who's Ravenclaw tendencies were only useful in making him famous. These characters were sorted into houses that boasted one trait while they showed another. Not all Gryffindors are brave, not all Hufflepuffs are stupid, not all Slytherins are evil, and not all Ravenclaws are smart. It's important to remember this if you don't feel smart enough as a Ravenclaw, or brave enough as a Gryffindor.

So what happens when you get placed into two different houses? In the Harry Potter universe, a character who sits under the Sorting Hat for longer than five minutes is called a hat stall. This is when the Sorting Hat has a tougher time deliberating which house it wants to place you in, and according to Pottermore's website, only happens once every fifty years or so. The closest to come to hat stalls were Hermione Granger and Neville Longbottom. The sorting hat spent nearly four minutes, according to Pottermore, deliberating whether or not to put Hermione in Ravenclaw or Slytherin. Neville, on the other hand, was determined to be placed in Hufflepuff, while the hat wanted him in Gryffindor. The only true hat stalls known to Harry were Peter Pettigrew and Professor McGonagall. Like Hermione, the latter had the sorting hat caught between Ravenclaw and Gryffindor. The former had the hat caught between Gryffindor and Slytherin (like I said, not all Gryffindors are brave). Sometimes, people cannot be pinned down to one specific trait. It's okay to have one foot in two different houses, it just means you're a well-rounded individual.

Personally, I have always been a Gryffindor. My first take on the Pottermore test was Gryffindor. My second time, however, I got Ravenclaw. All of my friends believe I should be Ravenclaw, because intelligence is my biggest trait, and I hold it in a higher regard compared to anything else. Again, I point you in the direction of Hermione and professor McGonagall, who are both fiercely intelligent, fiercely brave women. I might not be brave according to Harry Potter standards: I don't throw myself willingly into danger, I'm introverted, I have anxiety. There are things I do, however, that do make me brave. Getting up and delivering a speech, or making an important phone call; when I do things that normally make me anxious, it makes me feel braver.

That's another thing: people come in all shapes and sizes, with any personality you can think of. Just because you don't fall under the direct, immediate definition of a house (bravery, intelligence, ambition, loyalty), it does not mean you are not a member of your house. Just because you are a Slytherin, it doesn't mean you are the worst person alive. Slytherins can be good. Slytherins are not evil, they are ambitious. They know what they want and they take it for themselves, no matter who or what gets in their way. Yes, most Slytherins in the series are evil, but I did point out that Regulus sacrificed himself for the good of the Wizarding World, to see Voldemort crumble. That doesn't seem like someone who is evil.

To be honest, you don't need to worry if you suffer from House Identity Crisis. What matters in the Harry Potter universe is that you are your best self. Whether that is as a Gryffindor, Hufflepuff, Ravenclaw, Slytherin, or any combination of the four, as long as you feel that loyalty, that is what matters. My sister might be a proud Hufflepuff, but personally, I am a proud Gryffinclaw. Nothing and no one is going to take that away from me.

Cover Image Credit: nocookie.net

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7 Reasons Why Literature Is So Important

"Literature Is One Of The Most Interesting And Significant Expressions Of Humanity." -P. T. Barnum
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Today, there are too many people who believe that literature is simply not important or underestimate its abilities to stand the test of time and give us great knowledge. There is a stigma in society that implies one who is more inclined toward science and math will somehow be more successful in life, and that one who is more passionate toward literature and other art forms will be destined to a life of low-paying jobs and unsatisfying careers. Somewhere along the line, the world has come to think that literature is insignificant. To me, however, literature serves as a gateway to learning of the past and expanding my knowledge and understanding of the world. Here are just a few reasons why literature is important.

1. Expanding horizons

First and foremost, literature opens our eyes and makes us see more than just what the front door shows. It helps us realize the wide world outside, surrounding us. With this, we begin to learn, ask questions, and build our intuitions and instincts. We expand our minds.

2. Building critical thinking skills

Many of us learn what critical thinking is in our language arts classes. When we read, we learn to look between the lines. We are taught to find symbols, make connections, find themes, learn about characters. Reading expands these skills, and we begin to look at a sentence with a larger sense of detail and depth and realize the importance of hidden meanings so that we may come to a conclusion.

3. A leap into the past

History and literature are entwined with each other. History is not just about power struggles, wars, names, and dates. It is about people who are products of their time, with their own lives. Today the world is nothing like it was in the 15th century; people have changed largely. Without literature, we would not know about our past, our families, the people who came before and walked on the same ground as us.

4. Appreciation for other cultures and beliefs

Reading about history, anthropology, or religious studies provides a method of learning about cultures and beliefs other than our own. It allows you to understand and experience these other systems of living and other worlds. We get a view of the inside looking out, a personal view and insight into the minds and reasoning of someone else. We can learn, understand, and appreciate it.

5. Better writing skills

When you open a book, when your eyes read the words and you take in its contents, do you ask yourself: How did this person imagine and write this? Well, many of those authors, poets, or playwrights used literature to expand their writing.

6. Addressing humanity

All literature, whether it be poems, essays, novels, or short stories, helps us address human nature and conditions which affect all people. These may be the need for growth, doubts and fears of success and failure, the need for friends and family, the goodness of compassion and empathy, trust, or the realization of imperfection. We learn that imperfection is not always bad and that normal can be boring. We learn that life must be lived to the fullest. We need literature in order to connect with our own humanity.

Literature is important and necessary. It provides growth, strengthens our minds and gives us the ability to think outside the box.

Cover Image Credit: google.com/images

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To The Person Waiting For The Right Time To Come Out, That Time Might Never Happen

Everyday you are wearing a mask that hides a core piece of your identity, and it is almost like living a double life. All you need is the right time to say who you really are. I'm sorry to be the one to break it to you, but the right time might never happen.

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Imagine having to conceal your identity from those closest to you. You are careful not to say the wrong things or do something that would expose who you really are. Everyday you are wearing a mask that hides a core piece of your identity, and it is almost like living a double life. This is the reality for some people who are waiting for the right time to come out. If you are one of these people, I'm sorry to be the one to break it to you, but the right time might never happen.

There are multiple reasons people wait to come out to the friends and family. For some, the issue might just be mentally preparing for the ordeal, even though they know deep inside that nothing will change between them and their family. For others the issue is trying to find the words to say to someone who is firmly anti-LGBTQ+.

Trying to open up to someone close to you about a something you know they are against is tough. People can change their mindsets and become more open towards the LGBTQ+ community, but that is not a guarantee. That is why the "right" time might never happen.

You know your situation best. If you are waiting to come out because of a certain someone, chances are you know what their reaction might be. You might be wrong and be pleasantly surprised, or you might be right and everything becomes chaos as expected.

That doesn't mean I'm saying don't come out. In fact, I want to say just the opposite to you. Be proud of who you are. There is an entire community that is ready to support you the second you ask for it: the LGBTQ+ community. We are worldwide, and a lot of us went through exactly what you are going through right now.

Even if you feel like you have no support system, trust me. There are several organizations that are one call or text away.

The anti-LGBTQ+ people in your life can't change you, and there's a chance they might not change for you. Learn to accept what you cannot change, and do the best with what you can.

Just remember this: What they think of you does not mean that is who you are.

Your self worth is not determined by who chooses to accept you. As a human being, you are worthy of love and respect. The "right" time for you to come out to a certain person might never happen, but the time to be you is now.

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