Gotham is a show that's been around for a couple years now, but hasn't had all the buzz and acclaim it deserves. Set in the adolescent years of Bruce Wayne and after the death of his parents, Jim Gordon is the only honest man left in Gotham.

For the die-hard Batman fans, it's a unique take on a tried and true story: to see the moral collapse of Gotham before Batman unleashes his justice upon the city.

The show may take place in a fictional city, but the issues are still relatable today. The wealthy one percent lavishing in the lap of luxury, while the middle and lower class suffers, faith in the government withering away, and fear tarnishing any trust still left between people. Greed, power, corruption, economic inequality - These are not foreign concepts unfamiliar to any country. In a time when it seems like the wealthy executives run the country, those who are sworn to represent the populace act against popular interest, everyone is looking for that hero that will stand up and refuse to be corrupted.

Jim Gordon is that man for Gotham.

When everyone else flees at the sight of danger or looks away from the suffering of another, Jim Gordon is the man that runs towards and helps as much as he possibly can. He is the hero that often gets relegated into the shadow of Batman and Harvey Dent, but Gotham shows us how important it is to be the first person to stand up to evil, to instill hope in those that had forgotten how to for themselves.

This unsung hero is similar to other figures in history and literature that emerged throughout the literal and figurative crucible.

This is why we admire John Proctor in Miller's adaptation of the Salem Witch Trials.

This is why we admire revolutionaries like Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Mahatma Gandhi for standing up for what is right.

Jim Gordon makes the conscious choice not to succumb to the gangs that rule Gotham, and John Proctor willingly goes to the gallows, refusing to allow his name be tainted by a false confession.

It takes someone, flawed or not, to raise their voice and stem the tide of corruption and insanity, but often, speech is not enough.

Action must be taken.

Integrity and honesty. This is what we need to see more of in our everyday lives. We need someone who calls our attention to the suffering instead of turning a blind eye. Jim Gordon and John Proctor remind us to look for the light of honesty in the darkness of corruption which begs the question:

What will it take for us to become the Gordons and Proctors in our own lives?