Florida Frees Myers And Williams After 42 Years

Florida Finally Frees Myers And Williams, Wrongfully Imprisoned For 42 Years

"When we have an opportunity to correct errors, we should do so," State Attorney Melissa Nelson said.

43
views

Florida clears the charges of Clifford Williams Jr. and his nephew, Hubert "Nathan" Myers after discovering a 77-page report that details eye witness statements that claim Williams and Myers were not at the scene of the crime, a confession from another man, Nathaniel Lawson, now deceased, who admitted to the murder, and physical evidence that proves their innocence.

Their defense failed them

Their defense attorney did not use any witnesses or evidence, but rather attacked the credibility of the accuser, which does not help prove their innocence since there is nothing for the jury to base it on. According to CNN News, the only reason Florida cleared Williams and Myers is because of the Conviction Integrity Review unit, which the state attorney created in 2017. The state threw out their charges after they found enough evidence that exonerates Myers and Williams to create a 77-page report. According to AP News the report from the state's attorney's office that outlines their reasoning for dropping the charges states, "In fact, the physical and scientific evidence actually contradicts her testimony about what happened."

The evidence does not add up

The statement from the state attorney's office illuminates how Myers's and Williams's defense failed them because there was a copious amount of evidence that proved their innocence. Among the many findings in the Conviction Integrity Review investigation report: Another man confessed to the murder and attempted murder because he felt bad about Myers and Williams taking the wrap for him. This man died in 1994 and there was no investigation into this mans whereabouts or anything during the time of the investigation.

Moreover, the case solely rested on the testimony of Marshall, one of the victims, and there was not any physical evidence that proved Myers and Williams were at the scene of the crime. The report thoroughly disproved Marshall's testimony because of all of the physical evidence that told a different story. Marshall claimed Myers and Williams unloaded the guns at the foot of her bed. However, the evidence from the report proves the guns shots came from outside and that there was only one gun.

So, the question is, what were Marshall's intentions and was this whole case racially charged?

The intentions are not clear

Nathan Myers and Clifford Williams were wrongfully imprisoned for nearly 43 years and were denied relief countless times. Myers, who recounted how he contacted Thibodeau's office after reading about the wrongful conviction initiation, claims, "Everyone else had plugs in their ears and wouldn't listen. I tried and tried and tried," which illuminates how the system was working against them and would not listen to their pleas of innocence. Consequently, the nephew and uncle wasted their lives away in prison and missed their families growing up because no one would do their job.

The intentions of Marshall and the criminal justice system are not clear in this situation due to missing facts. In my opinion, their intentions seem clear and unified, which was to put away two black men simply because of their skin color. This may sound far fetched, but physical evidence was ignored and only the sole statement from Marshall was used during a trial. Does that not seem weird? It does to me because the guilt of a defendant is supposed to be proved beyond a reasonable doubt and eye-witness statements are not enough to do so.

Furthermore, Myers attempted copious times to get his case reviewed but got denied every time. It appears the criminal justice system was working against him until two years ago when the Black Lives Matter movement caught traction on social media and in the news. Consequently, I believe the facts of the case were ignored until the government felt pressured by the people to create the Conviction Integrity Review unit.

* * *

Overall, it is unbelievable that it took 42 years for Nathan Myers and Clifford Williams to be released. All the evidence proved their innocence, but their defense never used any of it to get them acquitted. Moreover, no investigations were done after a confession from someone and they remained in prison.

They should have been released much earlier and, in fact, should have never been imprisoned at all.

Popular Right Now

Boys No More: The Story Of Benjamin Eastman's Murder

Benjamin Eastman was only 16 years young when his best friend Benito Marquez (16) and Marquez’s older brother Jonathan Adamson (21) gruesomely took his life.

6320
views

Benjamin Eastman, a 16-year-old boy from Randle, Washington, was found dead late June afternoon he had been reported missing by family on June 24th. His remains were discovered by the Lewis County's Sherriff's Office just four days later in a marked, shallow grave.

Benjamin was allegedly reported missing after his family could not reach him when he left his home Sunday morning after being invited by his best friend, Benito Marquez, to go camping. Benito reported to police that Eastman had failed to show up to his home that Sunday morning. Four days after and still there was silence from Benjamin, Benito Marquez posted on Facebook pleading for anyone who knew the whereabouts of the boy to contact police or Benjamin's father.

On the same day, the boy's remains were discovered on Marquezes family property in a shallow and obvious grave. When asked about the grave, Benito claimed the grave belonged to the family's dog that had recently passed away, given the situation police investigated.

Marquez is not the only suspect in the case.

Benito's 21-year-old brother, Jonathan Adamson, was also a suspect in the gruesome murder. Their mother, Kindra Rose Adamson, and Jonathan's girlfriend, Emma Brown, were just recently arrested when police found that both knew about Benjamin's murder after it occurred and did not report it to authorities. Kindra also helped the boys flee East after the incident. Both are being charged with 1st-degree criminal rendering.

Police have reported Adamson as giving information from the night of the 24th. Adamson claimed the two had knocked Benjamin to the ground, kicked him over 100 times, sexually assaulted him with a stick, and for good measure, hit Benjamin over the head with a rock multiple times to assure he was dead, all within a span of 20-45 minutes. The autopsy report corroborated Adamson's story and stated the cause of death was, in fact, a blunt force trauma to the head.

After Eastman was presumed dead by the brothers, they stripped their clothes and his to burn them, along with the shovel used for the initial burial. After an unspecified amount of time, Marquez and Adamson became paranoid of the possible discovery of the body so they moved the remains to a more shallow place on their grandparent's property and marked it with a cross made of sticks. They did not burn that shovel, nor did they dispose of the matching twine and plastic found in the barn that was used on the body.

As of July 2nd, the brothers were arrested by a state trooper on their way to Ellensburg. Marquez and Adamson are facing charges including 1st-degree murder, rape of the 1st degree, tampering with evidence, and unlawful disposal of remains. Their bail has been set to $10 million bail and although Marquez is only 16, he will be facing an adult trial. The only motive discussed at this time was the possibility of a girl being the cause of the dispute. Adamson has been arraigned as of July 12th and has pleaded not guilty to all charges placed against him.

Now that I have presented all of this information to you, let's look at the unsolved parts.

Evidence:

This evidence seemed a little to easy to find. From the outside looking in, it appears they wanted the body to be found when it was. Many people in law enforcement understand the saying "only the stupid ones get caught." Is that the case here? The positioning of the evidence also seems too cookie-cutter. After burning the first shovel, they left the head in the fire pit. They marked the grave with an obvious cross with upturned soil.

Benjamin was reported by many as happy, caring, and loving. So why is the motive for his murder not being discussed further than "possibly over a girl?" Benjamin's father seems to be handling this extremely well and claiming he will continue to approach this case with love instead of hate because that is what his son would want. He heard of the rape of his son in court, and somehow only stared at the brothers. I'm not saying he's responsible in any way, but I think he may know more than he shows, maybe even about a motive with the closeness of the two.

Finally, why did Marquez lie about the grave and what happened, but not Adamson? How could Adamson so easily tell the story? Maybe it's possible that the only involvement Benito had was luring Benjamin to the area.

The case is still fairly fresh, however, these should be some of the first things investigated before the arraignment which has already happened for one of the brothers. l believe there's a lot more to the story that is not being noticed/talked about.

Cover Image Credit:

Igor Trepeshchenok / Magdeleine

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

US Secretary Of State Mike Pompeo Finds Camaraderie At Texas A&M

"At my alum, we were taught not to lie cheat, steal, or tolerate those who do. Then I was the CIA Director. We lied, we cheated, we stole. We had entire training courses!"

- Mike Pompeo

322
views

On Monday, April 15, U.S. Secretary of State, Mike Pompeo, visited Texas A&M; University in College Station. I was fortunate enough to attend and ask him (preselected and edited) questions in front of the audience.

Fair warning, this article may not be your typical journalistic article that reports on political figures. There are plenty of those out there that you can and should read! But for this article, let's spice things up; I want to paint a picture of my first time communicating with a globally authoritative entity, including how Pompeo presented himself and how that presentation was received by my home.

Tone-wise, the situation felt like it had a self-conscious sense of esteem to it - likely stemming from the fact that Pompeo graduated from a military academy and was currently speaking to a few hundred people at a school with similar ties to the military.

Despite the rigid stuffiness and the irrational feeling that I was going to get sniped by the Secret Service if I even looked at the Secretary wrong, I was still excited to get in there and shake things up. Bug-eyed and buzzing with the anticipation that politics gives me, I checked in with the press and media. I was ready to absorb the experience.

Here's a breakdown of all things Pompeo-town.

First impression: as Pompeo, a sizable and stoic former CIA Director, stomped out to the podium, I couldn't help but compare him to other politicians. You see, Pompeo is not known for his glamour or his magnetism. But this seemingly unpolitical quality actually worked for this particular audience.

A strong aspect of the culture at TAMU is our laud of the useful, plain, forthright things, stripped of the glitz and straight to the point. Henceforth, I came to the conclusion that Texas A&M; is the perfect place for the relatively uncharismatic Secretary of State to directly explain diplomacy. Moreover, he urged the mini-versions of him in the crowd to pursue diplomacy and "learn how to shut up" as he did.

Relating to the presence of the Corps of Cadets on our campus, Pompeo contends, "diplomacy and military strike go hand in hand." He furthers his pitch, "the State Department has a long history of hiring people with a military background. And Texas A&M;, with its great military history, could provide many great public service leaders just as West Point has done through the years."

As questions from the audience permitted, he discussed foreign policy. Everywhere from "the crisis in Venezuela" to "coalitions in Turkey" to "sanctions in North Korea" was brought up. For the most part, the audience seemed to be tracking with him, listening intently (with the exception of a couple of folks in the audience who tried to interrupt his lecture in order to inquire about immigration reform and the Muslim ban). A straight-shooter, Pompeo was received well by the university with only a few personal anecdotes and jokes.

He did, however, get some laughs for popping any bubbles of political idealism when he said, "At my alum, we were taught not to lie cheat, steal, or tolerate those who do." (Fun fact: this phrase is also shared by Aggies!) He continues, "Then I was the CIA Director. We lied, we cheated, we stole. We had entire training courses!"

I don't mean to downplay Secretary Pompeo's charm. He made eye contact with me and every other interviewer, he greeted his listeners well, he skillfully subverted complex topics, and he spoke eloquently. But if today's political commentators argue that modern public servants prioritize style at the expense of substance - he would likely stand as the model antithesis to that statement, valuing substance over style in all matters.

As his time winded down, Pompeo stated that the reason why he does what he does, a laborer in the public sector, is to help the people of the United States, culturally and economically. The State Department currently justifies its existence with its diplomatic mission to aid developing countries in their journeys to becoming stable and democratic players in both the global village and the world market.

His parting words to us were, "I know that you all have a tremendous sense of duty, a tremendous sense of service. I hope that today that you can see that America's State Department is committed to living up to those standards."

Related Content

Facebook Comments