Exploring Abandoned Aircraft Hangars In Pheonix

Exploring Abandoned Aircraft Hangars In Pheonix

An up-close encounter with land-locked and abandoned airplanes.
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Phoenix, Arizona

September, 2016

Word of mouth drove my friend Madie and I to an old abandoned aircraft hangar, on a day still too hot to be September. Unfortunately, I do not know the history of the site, but left for dead were seven cargo planes and the like, and a sad old warehouse. The scene looked post-apocalyptic, the airplanes deemed totally dysfunctional, with electrical wiring gnarled and out of place, broken windows, defacement by graffiti, evidence of fire, and no-strings-attached vandalism. The site was eerie, being in the middle of a farm field outside the city, it was quiet, and the only sound to be heard was the settling of gravel underfoot. The tone of the scene, however, did not reflect our mood, and many photos were to be taken, much fun was to be had, and much exploring to be done.

Photography by Madisson Hrimnak

Cover Image Credit: Madisson Hrimnak

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As An Original Northeasterner, I Grew To Love The South And You Can, Too

Where the tea is sweet, and the accents are sweeter.

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I'm not Southern-born. I'll come right out and say it. I was born in Connecticut and moved to Atlanta when I was 9 years old. I didn't know a single thing about the South, so I came without any expectations. When I got here, I remember that the very first thing I saw was a Waffle House. I thought it was so rare to see whatever a waffle house was but little did I know there was a WaHo (how southerners refer to Waffle House) every two miles down the street.

There is such a thing as "southern hospitality," and it's very pleasant for a newcomer to see. Southerners are raised with such a refreshing sense of politeness, and their accents are beautifully unique. It brings a smile to my face when I hear a southern accent because it's such a strong accent and one of my favorites. They answer your questions with "Yes, ma'am" or "No, ma'am" in the most respectful tone. I remember feeling so grown and empowered just because I got called ma'am. Southerners' vocabulary and phrases really have its ways of integrating into your own vernacular.

Before I came to Georgia, I never really said words like "Y'all" and "Fixin' to" but it's definitely in much of what I say now. I can tell when I go back up north to visit family that some of what I say may sound a little off because the dialect is very different. I find no shame in it, though, and neither should any southerner.

The weather in the South isn't so bad, in my opinion. Sure, there is very high humidity, but after living here for 10+ years, you learn how to deal with it. However, there's nothing like the summer thunderstorms. I love stormy, rainy weather and it rains quite often in the south, so when my birthday in July rolls around, I look forward to seeing that rain. It's the most peaceful weather to me and inspires me to write even more.

I could go on and on about the amazing fried foods here or the iconic yet insane Atlanta traffic, but those aren't what make me love the South. The people of the south are so different from up north but in the best ways. Everyone is so expressive and creative, as well as their own unique self. Southerners aren't the shaming kinds of people, but instead the kind who embrace who you are from the start. There's a fierce loyalty and a strong sense of appreciation that is just unmatched by any other place. No matter where I go, I always find comfort in knowing that I'll be coming back to this place I'm proud to call home.

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