Emma Watson Is Hiding Books In Paris And It's Awesome

Emma Watson Is Hiding Books In Paris And It's Awesome

It's like Pokemon Go, except with essential feminist literature.
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So by now, I'm sure you've at least heard of Hulu's newest original series, "The Handmaid's Tale." Based off of the novel by Margaret Atwood, "The Handmaid's Tale" takes place in a dystopian society and focuses on issues such as sexism, classism, and overall survival.

"The Handmaid's Tale" has already taken the world by storm with its strong feminist messages. So much so that it has inspired actress and activist, Emma Watson, to spread the word along her travels; especially in Paris. Wednesday, Emma Watson teamed up with The Book Faries and hid copies of "The Handmaid's Tale" across Paris.

So naturally, this led to thousands of Parisian fans to go on a city-wide hunt to find these copies left by Watson. Fans posted photos on social media of the copies they found and the locations of which they were hidden. And those lucky enough to get their hands on a copy freaked out.

It was basically like Pokemon Go, except with essential feminist literature. What I like the most about Emma Watson and The Book Faries' efforts is that they created an event that encourages adults and young adults to read. While it is much easier to stare at your computer and television, there is no doubt that reading can have an impact on everyone's lives. Reading also promotes more of a personal connection between the reader and their favorite story. While many people can barely keep up with the titles of their favorite TV shows and movies, everyone remembers the title and the connection they had with their favorite book.

Cover Image Credit: Twitter

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6 Things You Should Know About The Woman Who Can't Stand Modern Feminism

Yes, she wants to be heard too.

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2018 is sort of a trap for this woman. She believes in women with all of the fire inside of her, but it is hard for her to offer support when people are making fools of themselves and disguising it as feminism.

The fact of the matter is that women possess qualities that men don't and men possess qualities that women don't. That is natural. Plus, no one sees men parading the streets in penis costumes complaining that they don't get to carry their own fetus for nine months.

1. She really loves and values women.

She is incredibly proud to be a woman.

She knows the amount of power than a woman's presence alone can hold. She sees when a woman walks into a room and makes the whole place light up. She begs that you won't make her feel like a "lady hater" because she doesn't want to follow a trend that she doesn't agree with.

2. She wants equality, too

She has seen the fundamental issues in the corporate world, where women and men are not receiving equal pay.

She doesn't cheer on the businesses that don't see women and men as equivalents. But she does recognize that if she works her butt off, she can be as successful as she wants to.

3. She wears a bra.

While she knows the "I don't have to wear a bra for society" trend isn't a new one, but she doesn't quite get it. Like maybe she wants to wear a bra because it makes her feel better. Maybe she wears a bra because it is the normal things to do... And that's OK.

Maybe she wants to put wear a lacy bra and pretty makeup to feel girly on .a date night. She is confused by the women who claim to be "fighting for women," because sometimes they make her feel bad for expressing her ladyhood in a different way than them.

4. She hates creeps just as much as you do. .

Just because she isn't a feminist does not mean that she is cool with the gruesome reality that 1 in 5 women are sexually abused.

In fact, this makes her stomach turn inside out to think about. She knows and loves people who have been through such a tragedy and wants to put the terrible, creepy, sexually charged criminals behind bars just as bad as the next woman.

Remember that just because she isn't a feminist doesn't mean she thinks awful men can do whatever they want.

5. There is a reason she is ashamed of 2018's version of feminism.

She looks at women in history who have made a difference and is miserably blown away by modern feminism's performance.

Not only have women in the past won themselves the right to vote, but also the right to buy birth control and have credit cards in their names and EVEN saw marital rape become a criminal offense.

None of them dressed in vagina costumes to win anyone over though... Crazy, right?

6. She isn't going to dress in a lady parts costume to prove a point.

This leaves her speechless. It is like the women around her have absolutely lost their minds and their agendas, only lessening their own credibility.

"Mom, what are those ladies on TV dressed up as?"

"Ummm... it looks to me like they are pink taco's honey."

She loves who she is and she cherished what makes her different from the men around her. She doesn't want to compromise who she is as a woman just so she can be "equal with men."

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My Adoption. My Life. My Business.

PSA: Stop trying to fit me into a box. Thanks.

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I want to start off by saying that I love being adopted. I don't wish for my life to be any different, and I wouldn't change the past, either. I love all the amazing people it's brought into my life. I love all my amazing family and friends. But most importantly, I love the amazing mom it's given me. I could not have been any luckier when it comes to my mom. She is amazing, understanding, strong, and someone I will always admire.

But some days being adopted can be annoying.

As a child, my race or my culture made sense to me...until third grade. My teacher assigned the class a culture project about our families and where we come from. Both my parents are Polish, therefore I know quite a bit about Polish culture. I was so excited and couldn't wait to talk about my family's culture and traditions. When it was my turn to present, I stood up in front of all of my classmates, looked at their faces, and said, "My family has a very strong Polish culture." The minute those words left my mouth, confusion appeared on everyone's faces. I saw them whispering to one another; some of them were making faces. I felt my face getting red and my hands start to sweat. I thought I had done something wrong or said the wrong thing.

I was adopted and came to the United States when I was three months old. As I've gotten older, some common questions I encounter are "Wait...you're an Asian girl with a white girl accent?" or "You're from Korea but you don't speak Korean?" I don't take it personally, I just simply respond with, "I'm adopted." Most people nod their head in an understanding fashion, but others are still confused and continue to question.

Look, I get it, you look at me and you can clearly tell I'm Asian. Anyone would assume that I only practice Asian culture and not Polish culture, which I understand. People always ask questions after I tell them I'm adopted, which is also fine, but they always want my whole life story. But they don't really want my whole life story, they just want the easy, short, five-minute version. Even when I'm done that speech, they still have comments and questions, which is where I get irritated.

My parents wanted their daughter to be a part of THEIR culture and THEIR traditions, which is what most parents hope for. People try to tell me I'm "not Asian enough," or that "I should do more Asian stuff," and even question "why I know Polish stuff." These questions are not even because they are curious about me, they are just questions that these people need answers to in order for them to understand the situation. They try to shame me for my outside not matching my inside.

When I was younger, these questions would get in my head. I would consider the idea that they were right. That I should try and know more Korean things, try to "be more Asian." I started to feel like I was doing something wrong or that I was breaking some social rule. But then I would try and "be more Asian," only to be told I was a "typical Asian" or that I only like those things "because I'm Asian."

As I've grown up, I've come to the conclusion that I'm damned if I do and damned if I don't. I learned that I can't please everyone and that I shouldn't have to. If I like who I am, then who cares what others think?

That being said, I just have one thing to say to those people: Mind your own damn business.

In my eyes, I am the perfect amount of Korean and Polish. Stop trying to tell me who I should be or what I should know. Stop telling me what I should and shouldn't like.

Most importantly, stop trying to figure out which box I belong in.

I am perfectly okay with not fitting in a certain category. Being adopted has made me more open-minded and taught me to never believe in stereotypes. I love that my life is this big melting pot of cultures. If I like something, it's because I like it, not because it's common among my race and vise versa. Being Korean AND being Polish are big parts of who I am. If that doesn't make sense to people, that's not my problem. I am who I am, and I love who I am.

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