Donald Trump, Comedy, And The True Meaning Of Being 'Politically Correct'

Donald Trump, Comedy, And The True Meaning Of Being 'Politically Correct'

Donald Trump has said several times that he is not "politically correct", but what being PC really mean?
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If you watch a debate, read the news, or just live in America and are an active member of society, you probably will hear something polarizing that businessman and Republican nominee Donald Trump has said. He does not speak like a politician. If you hear his informality, his lax attitude on the stage, as well as his tone and heavy dependence on adjectives, you could see that he sounds like any other person with good speaking skills would sound, as opposed to Bernie Sanders' jerky, staccato voice or Hillary Clinton's calculated, smug approach. However, the media isn't up in arms about Trump's way of speaking; it's what he's saying that's doing the real damage.

Donald Trump has insulted women, Hispanics and Muslims, and that's just in the past year, and that's in public. Despite being the front-runner for a party that does the same thing, things like this haven't been said before so out in the open. The best way to describe it is what Jason Sudeikis said, impersonating Mitt Romney on Saturday Night Live: "We at the GOP, the party of the great Ronald Reagan, we do not say racist or sexist things. We imply them subtly over decades and decades of policy, so I felt that I had to take matters into my own tanned, well-manicured hands.”

In a Republican debate, Trump had said "I think the big problem with this country has is being politically correct." Wait. Sorry. I have to analyze one thing before I get back on topic: it's the "big" problem? So many problems this country has, and the thing that plagues us worse than all else is our political correctness? Is that going to be the thing you say you're going to do in your first 100 days in office, is stopping political correctness? I can see it already: "The War on Political Correctness." Yeah, you could call it "The War on PC," but I don't think the company PC would be too happy about it, and God knows you are looking for the interest of businesses first.

Sorry. Had to get that out of my system. As I was saying, Trump has made being PC a big problem, and one could only connect his rejection of this to be synonymous to his susceptibility to very honest language, even if it's not true. In turn, you can make the claim that Trump considers political correctness to be curbing language to be soft and general, while still not making any generalizations. For example, the phrase "they're bringing drugs. They're bringing crime. They're bringing rapists," Donald Trump's PC converter would make it "illegal immigration can lead to many instances of trouble for our country." Words like "trouble" are soft, and words like "can" makes illegal immigration seem more like a risky endeavor that is only seen through in certain scenarios, being general without generalizing.

However, I don't consider this to be what Political Correctness is about, and while the nation is starting to discuss political correctness from now (and, with South Park doing an episode about it, you know it's definitely in the national discussion), I think it's time to really dig deep and find what being politically correct really means. What's the place to look? Comedy.

Last year, Jerry Seinfeld said he stopped performing on college campuses because they are politically correct and are quick to equip jokes with the words "racist" or "sexist." This is Jerry Seinfeld we're talking about, here. He isn't clean in terms of the Brian Regan's of the world, but he sure is no Anthony Jeselnik. What Jerry Seinfeld does make jokes about, along with 99 percent of other comedians, white males or otherwise, are about minority groups.

There are a few different kind of jokes, however, and, to make it clear, I created a graph for this:

In a world where white people have been talking about minorities just to put them down forever, watching Louis C.K. doing stand-up might make you squirm at first, but when you finish watching him and re-watching him, you realize that there really is nothing offensive. You could see a the title of Louis C.K.'s clip of "I Enjoy Being White," and things are not looking good, but you watch the clip and you actually realize that it's a criticism against white privilege. Intelligence like this is why Louis C.K. is one of the most critically loved comedians of the century, but it's also why he is one of the most controversial.

Then you take people who put down minority groups. Some people do it genuinely (see above), but the Stephen Colbert's of the world do it as satire of people who actually are genuinely racist. In this way, they actually poke holes in the same arguments that they're satirically supporting, giving us a better understanding of the prejudice we actually deal with in the real world.

I'll give you an actual example, this time from Bo Burnham and his song "Klan Cookout." The song from Bo's self-titled debut is from the perspective of a modern day Klu Klux Klan member and speaks about his beliefs and practices. There are some outright — albeit funny — put downs like "And if you're black/Don't want to see your face/They're like a high school track/Just a stupid race." However, there are also some subtle put downs to his own kind, like references to incest and nazism. Again, this seems alarmingly racist, but there are no legitimate claims for prejudice that exceeds what we've already heard, and in the end, we're actually just laughing at the speaker.

How does being politically correct fit into this? Being politically correct is putting all of these categories into the genuine downputting category. In other words, being politically correct is defending a demographic that doesn't need defending in response toward a comment toward that demographic that wasn't genuinely offensive. I think that, other than our generally accepting society, a reason that our country is quick to these labels is that we are a country that is more adept to being quick and not thinking over things too much. With Twitter, you can think of something, and it will be online in thirty seconds. Likewise, you can see a bit called "I Enjoy Being White" and label it racist without really thinking over what it really means.

And these bits aren't only okay; they're essential to the path to true equality. If we suppress any talks about race, sex, gender identity, etc., we also suppress progress. Ignorance is not a virtue when it comes to accepting of other people. If you are accepting of another type of person, you should be educated on those people because if you don't, it will lead to microaggression. And, in my experience, I have heard many more microaggressions than I have heard non-put-down jokes about minority groups gone wrong. If we suppress other people, if we prefer to stay ignorant, how much better are we than the ignorant people who decided to discriminate and start this whole thing?

So yes, Donald Trump is not politically correct, but not in the way he thinks. And when he talks about who is coming over the border, it's not just that he isn't politically correct. He isn't correct. These are people fleeing violence and poverty and want to start a new life here, in America, ironically called the greatest country on Earth over and over again by the same people who don't want other people to do so, and Trump labels them as criminals?

Political correctness, on the other hand, is something we shouldn't strive for because it's superfluous, exaggerating, thus the word "political." We should strive for a truer, more honest America, and by "honest" I don't mean bigots saying what they feel. I'm talking about the true consciousness of the sum of our beautiful, diverse country.

Cover Image Credit: http://intellectualconservative.com/americas-toxic-brew-diversity/

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I'm The Girl Who'd Rather Raise A Family Than A Feminist Protest Sign

You raise your protest picket signs and I’ll raise my white picket fence.
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Social Media feeds are constantly filled with quotes on women's rights, protests with mobs of women, and an array of cleverly worded picket signs.

Good for them, standing up for their beliefs and opinions. Will I be joining my tight-knit family of the same gender?

Nope, no thank you.

Don't get me wrong, I am not going to be oblivious to my history and the advancements that women have fought to achieve. I am aware that the strides made by many women before me have provided us with voting rights, a voice, equality, and equal pay in the workforce.

SEE ALSO: To The Girl Who Would Rather Raise A Family Than A Feminist Protest Sign

For that, I am deeply thankful. But at this day in age, I know more female managers in the workforce than male. I know more women in business than men. I know more female students in STEM programs than male students. So what’s with all the hype? We are girl bosses, we can run the world, we don’t need to fight the system anymore.

Please stop.

Because it is insulting to the rest of us girls who are okay with being homemakers, wives, or stay-at-home moms. It's dividing our sisterhood, and it needs to stop.

All these protests and strong statements make us feel like now we HAVE to obtain a power position in our career. It's our rightful duty to our sisters. And if we do not, we are a disappointment to the gender and it makes us look weak.

Weak to the point where I feel ashamed to say to a friend “I want to be a stay at home mom someday.” Then have them look at me like I must have been brain-washed by a man because that can be the only explanation. I'm tired of feeling belittled for being a traditionalist.

Why?

Because why should I feel bad for wanting to create a comfortable home for my future family, cooking for my husband, being a soccer mom, keeping my house tidy? Because honestly, I cannot wait.

I will have no problem taking my future husband’s last name, and following his lead.

The Bible appoints men to be the head of a family, and for wives to submit to their husbands. (This can be interpreted in so many ways, so don't get your panties in a bunch at the word “submit”). God specifically made women to be gentle and caring, and we should not be afraid to embrace that. God created men to be leaders with the strength to carry the weight of a family.

However, in no way does this mean that the roles cannot be flipped. If you want to take on the responsibility, by all means, you go girl. But for me personally? I'm sensitive, I cry during horror movies, I'm afraid of basements and dark rooms. I, in no way, am strong enough to take on the tasks that men have been appointed to. And I'm okay with that.

So please, let me look forward to baking cookies for bake sales and driving a mom car.

And I'll support you in your endeavors and climb to the top of the corporate ladder. It doesn't matter what side you are on as long as we support each other, because we all need some girl power.

Cover Image Credit: Unsplash

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The Misconceptions Of Feminism And What We Can Do To Change Them

There are those who have extremist views, but they do not represent the heart of what feminism is about.

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I recently saw an article treading on this website titled "I Am A Female and I Am So Over Feminists" and of course, had to read this because it caught my eye (as it should, so good job to the writer and the editor) and was completely baffled at the blatant misinterpretation of what feminism is about. Though I agree that there are a number of feminists that put down men and blame them for everything, there are also plenty that just strive for equality without necessarily resorting to gender-blaming tactics. The article writer's analysis summed up seems to be that women are doing a lot better than before, that women despite having entered the work-force after men are doing a kick-ass job (and it's true) but the concept isn't exactly there.

Let's backtrack: "feminism" as defined by google means "the advocacy of women's rights on the basis of the equality of the sexes." At no point in this does it equate to feminism meaning women now being better than men, but it does involve calling out injustices and inequality! If we see a woman is getting paid less than a fellow co-star when they're both equally important and famous, then that injustice should be addressed! It's not about being angry at all men, even though it is fun to poke at me or others, it's simply just making sure that the inequality is heard! Women are strong and independent and feminism is not arguing that women cannot be vulnerable and also find a companion in a man if they are feminists. That's a misconception!

I've heard women like Emma Watson, goodwill ambassador for UN Women, and Malala Yousafzai, Pakistani activist for female education, talk about the notions of feminism so eloquently and educated that I feel like they are worthy of being shared below:

Malala explains how everyone can participate in being feminists.

As Emma Watson says, "Fighting for women's rights has too often become synonymous with man-hating...this has to stop."

If you took the time to watch some of these clips, you come to understand where I'm getting at with this article. Hating on men is NOT synonymous with feminism. It's not about thinking a man to be rude when they compliment women or offer help, but about allowing women to feel empowered in and of themselves. They don't need men to tell them that they are worthy, but it is not something that is discouraged so long as it is done appropriately and correctly.

I agree that the United States and many European nations have come far in women's rights, but just getting far does not equate to being equal. Progress is not synonymous with equality. When women are paid the same as men, when they are afforded the same respect, when they are given fair representation on behalf of rights that pertain to them and not men - that's when equality is reached. I cannot possibly phrase this as well as Emma Watson did, but this is my way, as a man, to explain that I can be a feminist without hating my own gender.

I notice how women are treated and how men are raised in misogynistic manners and it irks me. Real feminism is not just advocating for women's rights, it's about advocating for men to let down their guards, to be allowed to be vulnerable. The writer of the article I mentioned earlier said how she thinks it's okay for women to be vulnerable in front of men, but what about the opposite? Men should feel the same. Women and men should be treated equally all throughout, in personal expectations, in society, and in their emotions.

Feminism is not so easily summed up to man-hating, and I despise seeing people who misinterpret the concept because of others who say or do things in the name of feminism. The problem lies in ill-educated individuals who contort the ideal a frame it in a way that works for their personal goals. I too hate self-proclaimed feminists that do not understand what they are advocating for, but you cannot sum up those poor educated individuals to represent a whole faction of women.

For the writer of that article, you stated how women are kick-ass and doing amazing for themselves, and I agree! What about women who are lazy? Are they going to ruin your statement? Are a few inactive people going to make your thoughts any less true? This is what I mean. Misguided feminists who do not understand the true concept of it are not the ones to listen to. Look up to individuals like Malala and Emma who define it much better than I ever will.

I want to reiterate this once more because it is just insanely true: women are kick-ass. If they are so kick-ass and doing well for themselves, then let's all be feminists and promote a healthy environment of gender equality that not only continuously benefits the women doing so well for themselves, but also the men who have been affected by societal norms too!

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