With the premiere of "Toy Story 4" approaching very soon, I've been thinking about all of these revivals that have been created in the past few years, specifically on television and streaming services.

There has been a trend to take an older TV show that gained much success "back in the day," and either reboot it or develop an entirely new concept, based on the name of the show. While it seemingly sounds like a great idea because of how many accolades it got in the past (and probably will with a revival), the phrase that comes to mind is: "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." Why ruin a classic TV series with a reboot that will probably leave us very unfulfilled?

Many things in life are done under the influence of money; TV shows and movie sequels are no different. Producers know that if they create another run of "Full House" (even 24 years later), it will do very well; we just can't get enough of the Tanner's. I loved the show as much as the next person, but I feel that the reboot ("Fuller House") falls short because of several factors. Some of these include but are not limited to, the aging cast, and many of the cast members not appearing on the show (or potentially headed for jail). Expectations for these reboots are so high, it makes it nearly impossible to come close to the original series. Streaming services have nothing to lose, since they are more subscription-based, rather than ratings-based.

There are some exceptions to my argument, especially when shows don't exactly have an ending. There was a lot of talk surrounding the cancellation of "Gilmore Girls" because the writer had three words that she wanted to use in the series finale; they never made it onto that final broadcast. That is until the four-part series on Netflix came out a few years ago. We then learned those last three words Amy Sherman-Palladino had saved for us (I won't spoil it for you). In my opinion, "Gilmore Girls" did deserve the sequel, but it still did not give me psychological closure.

With the increased amount of reboots these days, it leaves me wondering if the show creators are even thinking outside the box, since rebooting a series can be "viewed" (no pun intended) as taking the easy way out. Instead of trying to create new content that someday could be considered classics, they are taking old classics and revamping them. While it may seem like a no-lose situation, the bar has already been set so high that it's almost impossible to surpass. On the other hand, some audiences are not as harsh as me and are willing to take what they can get.