Dave Ramsey, Thank You For Sharing Your Money Tips And Knowledge With The Rest Of Us

Dave Ramsey, Thank You For Sharing Your Money Tips And Knowledge With The Rest Of Us

From just starting your program and being only on baby step one I have realized many things.

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Ever since starting college I have always had that thought in the back of my head about how am I going to pay off my student debt after getting out of college. This is probably a thought that every student has when they attend college and they know that after they receive their education that they are out in the real world where they have payments to make every month and probably be in debt for most of their life. But after watching your podcast and following your Instagram and seeing all these people paying off hundreds of thousands of dollars in a couple of months is very inspirational.

Paid off student debtDave Ramsey Instagram

From just starting your program and being only on baby step one I have realized many things. One, I spend money on a lot of things that I don't need but never realized until I started tracking my spending to make a budget. Two, saving a thousand dollar before actually tackling your debt is a great task as it shows that if you can save a thousand you can find a way to pay off your debt then. Though it does seem like a long process that doesn't seem possible till you finally hit the triple-digit mark. Three, you don't actually need a credit card in life because you will actually have money you can spend instead. Though I am still wondering how exactly this would work later on with wanting to buy homes and cars.

But overall thank you for sharing your story and knowledge about money and your experiences so others can learn and do better with theirs. So let's all be weird and not broke as you like to say.

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To The Nursing Major

Is it all worth it?
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"You're going to feel like quitting. You're going to struggle. You'll have days where you'll wonder, 'what's it all for?'

You'll have days when people attempt to break you down, or challenge your intelligence, skills, and right to be where you are. You'll have moments when you question your own abilities, and perhaps your sanity - but you'll rise.

You'll rise because your strength as a nurse is not determined by one grade, one shift or one job - it's an ongoing journey of learning, honor, humility and a chance to make even the smallest difference in the lives of your patients."

Don't ever give up on achieving your dreams to be a nurse. Keep pushing forward, no matter how hard it is. Nursing is not an easy major. You will have very little, if any, time to do anything other than study. But just think about how great it will feel to connect with a patient, pray with them, and even save his or her life.

This will make all of the late night studying, weekly breakdowns, countless cups of coffee, and tests so hard all you want to do is cry, worth it. To see a patient's face light up when you walk in his or her room will make your heart melt and you'll know you chose the right major.

The kind of nurse you will be isn't based on a test grade, it's based on your heart for the people you are caring for. You may have failed a class, but don't let that ruin you. Try again and keep pushing toward your goal. Don't allow others around you to drag you down and tell you that you aren't good enough to be a nurse.

Show them how strong you are and that you will never give up.

There will be days when all you want to do is quit, I know I question my major more than once a week; however, there is a patient out there that needs you and your caring heart. You can do this, have faith in yourself that you can move mountains.

I will say that you definitely must have a heart for nursing.

Personally, I want to be a Pediatric Oncologist and work at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. Just the thought of those precious children going through the hardest part of their lives, keeps me going so that I can be there for them. I want to be a light to my patients and their families during a dark time. When I feel like giving up, I just think about how many lives I have the chance to touch and I keep on going.

So when you feel like giving up, just think about your future patients and how you can make a difference, even if its only for one person. I love the quote from Katie Davis that states, "I will not change the world, Jesus will do that. But I can change the world for one person. So I will keep loving, one person at a time."

Even though this quote is about foreign missions, I believe it fits the mold for nursing as well.

Nurses have the opportunity to change the world for people every day. Just remember that, smile, don't give up, and keep pushing toward your goal.

Cover Image Credit: chla.org

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Politics And Economics Are As Important As STEM

Why you should care about politics and economics.

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It's common for people to come to the conclusion that politics, economics, and the humanities are questionable fields. Not useful. Not productive. Jobless. Nonsense.

I concede none of those points. In fact, I frequently find that politics and economics are extremely important to well-being and prosperity.

The stigma against political science is far stronger than that against economics. This opinion is likely because of the scientific and mathematical elements contained within economics as a discipline. Moreover, the economy is an important part of society. It affects our daily lives. It discusses our wealth, our country's performance, and the country's overall state of affairs. But most would argue that economics can't stand beside chemistry, biology, or engineering. That perspective demonstrates two things:

1) lack of critical thought, and

2) mob mentality.

The intersection of political science and economics determines everything. The world spins on the market. The market is undoubtedly influenced by government actors, politicians, politics. Don't believe me? Let's consider an example.

The stock market had expanded rapidly in the 1920s, but stocks were being overvalued. Companies were not actually worth their stock market value in the real world. People really wanted stocks, so demand was high — but this wasn't an accurate representation of how companies were performing. Investors began to realize this and started to sell overpriced stocks left and right.

Eventually, it became clear that investors were uncertain. Trades were being made at rapid rates, but the investors were selling stocks for cheaper than they had been purchased. Sixteen million shares were traded in one day. Everyone was losing money.

So naturally, consumer confidence declined. People stopped spending. They were afraid of losing money. This dramatic decrease in spending and investment led to companies producing less. Spending and demand went down, and subsequently supply went down as well. Companies stopped producing as much as they had been because they weren't selling as much as they had been. As a result, people were laid off. Households were losing jobs -- they were losing cash, causing spending to decline even further. So more people were laid off. You can see the vicious cycle. At one point, half of the United States' banks failed. Fifteen million Americans were unemployed. The world was in the midst of an economic disaster.

This situation is commonly referred to as the Great Depression. It went on for 15 years.

This is what economics studies. It analyzes, attempts to anticipate and hopefully, prevents these situations. Where does politics fit in?

Obviously, the government tried to respond to the Great Depression. Franklin D. Roosevelt was the president at the time. He passed a variety of policies to stimulate the economy. Yet the Great Depression continued until WWII. In fact, two UCLA economists concluded that FDR's policies prolonged the Depression by several years.

It's unimportant whether they are right or not. What is important is that the economic policy by Roosevelt (and Congress) certainly had an impact on the country's economy. In fact, it was the reason some people may or may not have had enough money to eat. It was the reason that people may or may not have had jobs. It was the reason people could or could not afford homes.

To argue that the intersection of politics and economics is a useless study would be out of touch. Economics and politics create or destroy the world we live in. The next time you're told that they don't, ask the person what would happen if the demand for STEM labor fell.

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