7 Myths About Community College You Can Declare As Fake News

7 Myths About Community College You Can Declare As Fake News

They're just as bad and unprofessional as Donald Trump's tweets.

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Growing up in the second snobbiest city in the US that literally lived up to its title was absolutely no joke. In my city, attending community college was more frowned upon than not going to college at all because most people not only could afford to send off their kids to four-year institutions RIGHT AFTER high school but pushed it intensely on them.

After attending community college for three years, I can attest that the following is a bag of bologna.

1. You're only going to community college because you're not as intelligent as your other peers

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This one grinds my gears the most. I do have to admit, I did not have the best grades in high school and I would have probably never gotten into schools like UC Berkeley or UCLA back then. I lacked the plethora of AP classes my other peers took and was not involved very much in my academics. I got accepted into a few random universities that I applied to back in high school so my intelligence level had little to do with why I decided to go to community college. Community college gave me the opportunity to become the better student I wish I could have been in high school and showed me that I do have the capability to be as smart as those I went to high school with.

2. Community college does not offer any help nor good services to those attending that would be offered at a four-year institution

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Each community college is different but the like most educational institutions, the staff and faculty are there to help their colleagues and their students. They want students to succeed in their educational journey and provide their office hours and contact information just like university professors do. They have academic advising counselors to guide students to ensure that they are taking the correct courses in order to transfer and plan our time at the community college. They have a great number of resources for internships, jobs, transfer guidance, etc. My community college had a health center which provided students with basic needs such as cough drops, asprin, Bandaids to flu shots, pregnancy tests, STD tests/condoms, psychological help, nutritional help, and so much more.

3. You're only going to community college because you can't afford a four year institution

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To some, this might be a reality but there are those who attend a four-year university, cannot afford it and get loans or receive substantial financial help from grants and/or scholarships. There are VARIOUS reasons on why someone chooses to go to community college and the financial aspect is an important one for many but not for all. There are people who can afford to go to a university but choose to do community college instead. There is so much economic diversity at community colleges just like at regular universities, not everyone is low income.

4. A degree from a community college is not worth anything

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It may not be AS valuable as a Bachelor's degree but it definitely shows that you worked to obtain a college degree (or multiple degrees if you're anything like me) before finishing your undergraduate program. In some careers, they might not mean anything but they look good on resumes and hype you up especially when applying for internships and jobs that are competitive among people with the same Bachelors as you.

5. Community college is an easy ride compared to a university

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College is not for everyone, not even for those who actually attend college. Course loads are rigorous and there is so much to learn in a short amount of time. To some people, it can be a breeze but to most, it takes a lot of work and effort in order to do well in college leveled academics. Community college is not easier than universities as a lot of courses have to be similar to those general education courses offered at universities.

6. Professors who teach at community colleges are under qualified compared to those at universities

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Surprisingly, many community college professors also teach or have taught at universities. It is really neat to have those professors since you get a taste of what taking their course at a university would be like but paying a LOT less for it. Even if they have not taught at universities, it does not mean they're bad professors compared to those who do teach at those institutions. I've been lucky with most of the professors I have had in community college and hope to get great ones just like them at my university.

7. You're not getting the full college experience that you would at a university if you go to a community college

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Community colleges are primarily filled with commuter students so there is no on-campus housing available like there are at universities nor does Greek life exist. Although those are mainly available at a university, you can still get a full college experience. If you move out from home into an apartment, you can say you're on you're own. As for Greek life, there are Greek honors societies for community colleges (such as Phi Theta Kappa, which I was a part of) rather than fraternities and sororities. Community colleges offer so many events for students such as club rush to join clubs and other organizations, athletics, performing arts, and so much more!

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I'm A Woman And You Can't Convince Me Breastfeeding In Public Is OK In 2019

Sorry, not sorry.

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Lately, I have seen so many people going off on social media about how people shouldn't be upset with mothers breastfeeding in public. You know what? I disagree.

There's a huge difference between being modest while breastfeeding and just being straight up careless, trashy and disrespectful to those around you. Why don't you try popping out a boob without a baby attached to it and see how long it takes for you to get arrested for public indecency? Strange how that works, right?

So many people talking about it bring up the point of how we shouldn't "sexualize" breastfeeding and seeing a woman's breasts while doing so. Actually, all of these people are missing the point. It's not sexual, it's just purely immodest and disrespectful.

If you see a girl in a shirt cut too low, you call her a slut. If you see a celebrity post a nude photo, you call them immodest and a terrible role model. What makes you think that pulling out a breast in the middle of public is different, regardless of what you're doing with it?

If I'm eating in a restaurant, I would be disgusted if the person at the table next to me had their bare feet out while they were eating. It's just not appropriate. Neither is pulling out your breast for the entire general public to see.

Nobody asked you to put a blanket over your kid's head to feed them. Nobody asked you to go feed them in a dirty bathroom. But you don't need to basically be topless to feed your kid. Growing up, I watched my mom feed my younger siblings in public. She never shied away from it, but the way she did it was always tasteful and never drew attention. She would cover herself up while doing it. She would make sure that nothing inappropriate could be seen. She was lowkey about it.

Mindblowing, right? Wait, you can actually breastfeed in public and not have to show everyone what you're doing? What a revolutionary idea!

There is nothing wrong with feeding your baby. It's something you need to do, it's a part of life. But there is definitely something wrong with thinking it's fine to expose yourself to the entire world while doing it. Nobody wants to see it. Nobody cares if you're feeding your kid. Nobody cares if you're trying to make some sort of weird "feminist" statement by showing them your boobs.

Cover up. Be modest. Be mindful. Be respectful. Don't want to see my boobs? Good, I don't want to see yours either. Hard to believe, I know.

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I Never Wanted To Go To College

I never wanted to go to college, but I stayed because I learned some things along the way - who knew.

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I went because it's what the family expected from me. It's a step towards a successful career path. And obviously because it's a natural progression from high school. But deep down I never wanted to go because I really found no reason to be there.

In my view if you weren't going into traditional career fields, going to college was an expensive long shot. I was also careful to pay attention to all the people that attended college only to work in fields different from what they originally studied.

I was wary but didn't care so I don't put much thought into it. I applied to a handful of schools and attended the one that was more convenient. Once there I found the whole process disheartening.

I relied heavily on financial aid and felt the interaction and choices I was making were more transactional then enriching. It was just like high school again. Go to class take notes, read the book take the test, rinse and repeat until you get the degree.

That was until I fell into a philosophy class that was really challenging. It was challenging in a way that I hadn't been experienced in a while. I was having trouble understanding the material but desperately wanted to learn it. I read books over and over until the concepts were crystal clear. It also helped that I had a teacher who was passionate about the subject as well.

It kind of changed my whole approach to picking classes. Sure I'd visit the advisors and get their take on how to follow the quickest path to graduation. But I also wanted to be intentional with my course selection and take classes where I would learn as much as I could in topics that interested me.

Whether or not they fit my major. That's the only thing that made going to school worth it. Learning topics that change how I approach life and challenged my thinking. Then I was growing intellectually and not just checking boxes for a degree.

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