Clovergender: The New Hoax Identity

Clovergender: The New Hoax Identity

"They tend to be attracted to young children, sexually or romantically."
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Now I know what some of you are thinking; Clovergender? What is that? Is it a part of the LGBT community? What exactly does it mean to be clovergender? Am I clovergender? Let me answer some of the questions that may be running through your mind right about now.

First, clovergender is NOT, I repeat, NOT a real identity you may identify yourself with. Clovergender is a mock term generated to ridicule the LGBT community. Clovergenders are "children at heart" or "children in adult bodies" and are "romantically or sexually attracted to children".

Second, as previously stated, clovergender is NOT a part of the LGBT community. The discussion of this new identity arose in early 2017 when various tweets appeared from Martin Shkreli. One of these tweets feautured, "Please spread clovergender awareness."

A reddit thread appeared to describe this new foreign term of 'clovergender' and what it means to identify yourself as such.

"Clovergendered people are believed to be cisgender at birth. However, their mind fails to develop past the age of 13. They tend to be attracted to young children, sexually or romantically. Clovergendered people are not to be confused with pedophiles. Pedophiles are generally predators to children. Clovergender are actually children at heart. Unfortunately, there is no known surgery at this time for clovergender individuals. Clovergender people are often misunderstood. This gender faces a lot of discrimination, and clovergender groups have one of the highest suicide rates in America. They have created an awareness moment of Tumblr, Twitter, and Facebook, using the hashtag #clovergenderthings."

So let's just take a second and breathe.....

So, basically what this is telling me is that when you are a clovergender and are sexually attracted to children, you're NOT a pedophile, correct? Yeah, that makes PERFECT sense. So basically because of this fake identity, you've just created a way for pedophiles to justify their actions. So, good job guys. You're doing great.

The legitimate troll Clovergender Facebook page, stated,

"It is alarming that we are being lumped with pedophiles. They and clovergender people are NOT the same thing. Clovergenders are children in adult bodies, while pedos are ADULTS in ADULT bodies. They are predators and we do not support them!"

Another Clovergender Facebook page, called Clovergender Rights has said the following,

"It's a sad reality we all face, when not every gender or age identity is respected and treated as equal. We need to end the hatred and end the bigotry. Gender rights are human rights!"
"A #Kindergender is an adult trapped in a child's body. Many people believe that Muhammad's wife Aisha was a kindergender. Some say Muhammad was a clovergender. There's no way to know for sure, but we do know that Muhammad married Aisha when she was 6 years old according to her solar age, and they consummated the marriage when Aisha was 9. Following the example of Muhammad and Aisha, the Islamic world has been very accepting of clovergendered and kindergendered individuals. In this respect, the Islamic world is more progressive than the west. They're paving the way for clover and kinder rights. It's time for us to join them.
💚 LOVE IS LOVE 💚"

"We also support #Kindergender people! We are not defined by solar age! They too need to be accepted for who they are! #Transage #Clovergender"
"It's ok to be a kid on the inside!"
"Brave Clovers will always have our support #lgbt #lgbtq #lgbtqa#clovergender #pride #loveforall"

Let me also restate the following sentence. Clovergender is NOT, I repeat, NOT a real identity you may identify yourself with. This "identity" is a hoax. It's fake. It was created to scorn the LGBT community. More of the matter is the fact that while this is most certainly fake, PEOPLE ARE TAKING IT SERIOUSLY AND IDENTIFYING THEMSELVES WITH IT!

How can anyone possibly believe in such nonsense? In such literal and utter bullshit? How can you possibly create a mocking term that in itself justifies pedophilia? I cannot begin to comprehend the ignorant and uneducated ideals that come from peoples' heads these days.

The problem with this hoax is that if people believe its a real thing, soon others will. Under a Facebook post from the page of Clovergender Rights, a person states,

"What's worse is this is exactly how the LGBT movement started with the same backlash response and 2018 look at us now."

That is the problem with joking of this new and unrealistic identity. You're convincing some that this is real. You might be making fun of the subject, but pedophiles and child molesters actions are now being made OK thanks to this.

So please, the next time you want to produce a false identity, don't. In this day and age, people will believe most of everything they see and read. All you're going to do is forge and fabricate a living and breathing nightmare for us all.

Cover Image Credit: Pexels.com

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1. They will do anything for you, literally.

My stepdad has done any and every thing for me. From when I was little until now. He was and still is my go-to. If I was hungry, he would get me food. If something was broken, he would fix it. If I wanted something, he would normally always find a way to get it. He didn't spoil me (just sometimes), but he would make sure that I was always taken care of.

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2. Life lessons.

Yup, the tough one. My stepdad has taught me things that I would have never figured out on my own. He has stood beside me through every mistake. He has been there to pick me up when I am down. My stepdad is like the book of knowledge: crazy hormonal teenage edition. Boy problems? He would probably make me feel better. He just always seemed to know what to say. I think that the most important lesson that I have learned from my stepdad is: to never give up. My stepdad has been through three cycles of leukemia. He is now in remission, yay!! But, I never heard him complain. I never heard him worry and I never saw him feeling sorry for himself. Through you, I found strength.

3. He loved me as his own.

The big one, the one that may seem impossible to some step parents. My stepdad is not actually my stepdad, but rather my dad. I will never have enough words to explain how grateful I am for this man, which is why I am attempting to write this right now. It takes a special kind of human to love another as if they are their own. There had never been times where I didn't think that my dad wouldn't be there for me. It was like I always knew he would be. He introduces me as his daughter, and he is my dad. I wouldn't have it any other way. You were able to show me what family is.

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I love you!

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Everyone Should Care About Latinx Issues, Regardless Of Their Own Identities

It's important no matter who you are or where you come from.

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Disclaimer: As someone who is white, I am speaking on a culture that is not my own and which I am not an authority on. Please remember this and do your own research. Reach out to those who do identify as Latinx but as always, respect that it is not the job of any minority population to field all questions and educate.

People often say that no matter how old you get or how much you think you know, you never stop learning. I've always found this to be true but recently I was reminded of just how true it really is. On March 27, Bowling Green State University held their 24th annual Latino/A/X issues conference. I had heard about the conference in passing much earlier in the month and it piqued my interest but admittedly slipped my mind pretty quickly after hearing about it. It wasn't until a friend of mine had informed me that she and another one of our friends were receiving awards at the conference that I finally put it on my calendar.

As I looked through the program at all of the different events scheduled for the day, the first to catch my eye was a theatrical performance called Spanish Ohio: Reflections on loss, gain acceptance and belonging moderated by a Bowling Green professor and friend, Emily Aguliar. I can confidently say that I have not, in a long time felt so confused and lost in a theatrical setting in a long time. The performance was presented in about 90% Spanish and 10% English and having little more than a basic understanding of Spanish from my high school days, I was able to understand a few key words or phrases here and there but more I just found myself intrigued by what I didn't understand...which was a lot. At the end of the performance, there was a sort of Q&A; where we as the audience could ask questions to the performers. During which time an audience member made a comment that really opened my mind.

She had said that it was important for people outside of the Latinx community to be lost in that moment. That the not understanding was what so many people whose first language isn't English feel all the time.

This statement really hit me hard and stuck with me. Even though I was at a performance at my college where I knew that I was safe, secure and taken care of, not knowing what was going on around me was overwhelming and a little unsettling. Not because I fear the existence of languages other than English, but because I felt as if I was expected to understand and take away things that I simply couldn't. And the fact that people move about in the world feeling like this every day in a society where they are not looked after or cared for was a painful but oh so necessary realization.

People are being forced to exist in a place that doesn't make it easy for them to do so. All too often the one piece of 'advice' given to those who speak any language other than English is simply to 'Just speak English' as if it is more important for the majority to feel comfortable and unthreatened by the existence of a language outside of our own than it is to respect the culture, language, and diversity of the Latinx community.

This conference really opened my eyes to the struggles of the Latinx community but at the same time, it highlighted and celebrated the achievements as well. I was lucky enough to be able to see two women who are very important to me receive awards for the work that they've done in and around the community. Both of these women are beyond deserving of the accolades they received. They are passionate, strong, opinionated women with knowledge and heart and I was thankful to be there to witness both of them receiving the recognition that they so deserve. It is SO important to recognize the contributions of people who have been pushed to the sort of outskirts of the conversation so to speak and I can say that it was very moving for me to see my friends as well as the others at the conference reveling in their identities and their cultures.

This is how it should be at all times, not just at a conference.

People should feel comfortable in their identities and people who are in positions of privilege should be using their voices to amplify the marginalized. I am so very thankful to have been able to attend this event and learn and grow in my understanding of culture, identity, and people. So, thank you to BGSU and LSU for putting in the work to make this possible for everyone, and to Emily and Camila-I'm proud of you both! Amplify the marginalized and underrepresented and never stop learning everything you can.

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