Chris Pratt And The Outrage Culture Of America

Chris Pratt And The Outrage Culture Of America

The latest victim of an ever-growing problem in America.
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This past year our society has been hijacked by political polarization to the point that being offended is more of a crime than actually saying something offensive is. I’ve never been a fan of Tomi Lauren’s “snowflake” title she created for the left where if you were offended by anything you were a “liberal snowflake.” Yet her title, and her career (where you at Tomi?), are complete jokes. Because if there’s one thing that really offends right-wingers, it’s when people don’t accept their beliefs in religion, abortion, vaccinations, etc. The fact of the matter is both sides are so incredibly fragile and “triggered” that you almost cannot say or do ANYTHING anymore.

What I’m talking about folks is the outrage culture. We live in a culture where anything you say is misconstrued and taken offensively to at least one person or group out there. And once that group speaks out, the public mob is out to put your head on a pike. Both the left and right are so bad for it, and it makes it more infuriating when both deny it. It’s ruining our comedy, our interactions, and our society.

Now let’s be clear, I do think there are actually offensive things to be said. It is 2017 and we are not the same society we were even a few years ago. It’s not cool to be a racist or a homophobe, you are in the minority. And if you say things that are directly antagonistic towards a person or group of people, then it may indeed be offensive. But we’ve given too much room to the extremists on this one. 90% of the time I don’t think people are actually offended, but they are taking advantage of the climate were living in and using it to destroy people who speak their mind. If you’re still unsure what I’m talking about, of what is and isn’t offensive, allow me to show you some recent examples.

Let's start with our good friend Star-Lord, also known as Chris Pratt. When he's not out saving the galaxy, taming dinosaurs, or saving Pawnee as Burt Maclin, he's living his normal celebrity life. That is until one day, Pratt gives an interview with Men's Fitness saying

"I don’t see personal stories that necessarily resonate with me, because they’re not my stories. I think there’s room for me to tell mine, and probably an audience that would be hungry for them. The voice of the average, blue-collar American isn’t necessarily represented in Hollywood.”

That's it. Seem's like a totally normal thing for a man to say, but that little part at the end blue-collar American isn't necessarily represented in Hollywood drove the internet absolutely insane. Suddenly everyone is attacking Pratt for his "white privilege" and how terrible he is for thinking this when there are so many groups and people out there who get no representation in Hollywood. Pratt literally didn't say anything else about any other group out there but one he feels he can relate to most. I'm sure Pratt (one of the biggest Hollywood stars there is today) has a pretty good feel on Hollywood and if it's what the man feels than who are we to judge? But the public was so offended by it for no god damn reason. Seriously, how is this offensive in any way? Because he didn't say blacks or Asians or trans people don't get enough representation, he's suddenly a terrible person? I don't buy it. But the backlash won and Pratt gave in, releasing an apology just a few hours later.

But if that didn't tip the scales for you, Pratt had another run-in with the outrage police, for a social media video for Marvel promoting the upcoming Guardians of the Galaxy 2 movie. Usually in these video's on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, the whole video has subtitles because not everyone can hear the video or turn on the volume on their phone or they just think it's easier to read what's being said. At the end of this particular video (which has been removed from the internet) Pratt says "C'mon seriously dude? You'd rather read those than hear me?" speaking about the subtitles.

Hours later we get this

Yes, I know what you're thinking. You have got to be fucking kidding me. Because of that little snippet at the end of the video encouraging people to turn the volume up as opposed to reading the subtitles, the "deaf community" came running with their pitchforks and torches. I'm sorry, but that's just ridiculous. Of all the things going on in this country and this planet, THIS is what people choose to be in an uproar about? You're offended because someone IN A VIDEO, wanted you to turn the volume so you can LISTEN TO YOUR VIDEO. And if you can't listen to the video THEY HAVE SUBTITLES FOR YOU. If were being honest here, how did the deaf people get so irate in the first place if they couldn't hear what Pratt was saying?

That's my point, people are jumping on to these things and making a outrage out of absolutely nothing even when it doesn't affect them at all. Someone saw this opportunity and leaped on it even though they probably weren't offended at all, they just want to cause chaos and drama. Surely a deaf person realizes when they are watching a video it is mean't to be heard. That is just how video and audio works. At this point why aren't we worrying about the blind people? How are they supposed to watch this video? Where is the braille transcript of the video for them to feel out? It never ends. If it's not one person getting offended it's another.

The saddest part is hours later Pratt posted a video of him apologizing entirely in sign language looking all sorry and sad as if he had accidentally killed someone's dog or something. Don't apologize Chris, you didn't do anything wrong, you didn't say an insensitive joke, you simply said how a video works. In no single way did Pratt say anything at all about deaf people, or people who cannot hear or anything antagonistic at all but everyone decided to spin the fucking shit out of it and turn it into something that it wasn't.

These are the best examples of outrage culture I can give you. It's people going out of their way to be offended by something that could not be more pedestrian and inoffensive. All of this is especially surprising considering our President can say he grabs women by their genitals, is allowed to make fun of handicapped people, and wants to bang his daughter; but heaven forbid Chris Pratt ask you to turn your volume up.

So I beg you, please - PLEASE - do not give in to the outrage culture. Stop and think for a second, "is this actually offensive? Is this actually an issue? Should I actually go on Facebook and rant about this?" I guarantee you 90% of the time it's not. Simply move on and put your time and effort towards things that actually matter.

WRITERS NOTE: I will not apologize for anything written in this article.

Cover Image Credit: freerepublic.com

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An Open Letter to the Person Who Still Uses the "R Word"

Your negative associations are slowly poisoning the true meaning of an incredibly beautiful, exclusive word.
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What do you mean you didn't “mean it like that?" You said it.

People don't say things just for the hell of it. It has one definition. Merriam-Webster defines it as, "To be less advanced in mental, physical or social development than is usual for one's age."

So, when you were “retarded drunk" this past weekend, as you claim, were you diagnosed with a physical or mental disability?

When you called your friend “retarded," did you realize that you were actually falsely labeling them as handicapped?

Don't correct yourself with words like “stupid," “dumb," or “ignorant." when I call you out. Sharpen your vocabulary a little more and broaden your horizons, because I promise you that if people with disabilities could banish that word forever, they would.

Especially when people associate it with drunks, bad decisions, idiotic statements, their enemies and other meaningless issues. Oh trust me, they are way more than that.

I'm not quite sure if you have had your eyes opened as to what a disabled person is capable of, but let me go ahead and lay it out there for you. My best friend has Down Syndrome, and when I tell people that their initial reaction is, “Oh that is so nice of you! You are so selfless to hang out with her."

Well, thanks for the compliment, but she is a person. A living, breathing, normal girl who has feelings, friends, thousands of abilities, knowledge, and compassion out the wazoo.

She listens better than anyone I know, she gets more excited to see me than anyone I know, and she works harder at her hobbies, school, work, and sports than anyone I know. She attends a private school, is a member of the swim team, has won multiple events in the Special Olympics, is in the school choir, and could quite possibly be the most popular girl at her school!

So yes, I would love to take your compliment, but please realize that most people who are labeled as “disabled" are actually more “able" than normal people. I hang out with her because she is one of the people who has so effortlessly taught me simplicity, gratitude, strength, faith, passion, love, genuine happiness and so much more.

Speaking for the people who cannot defend themselves: choose a new word.

The trend has gone out of style, just like smoking cigarettes or not wearing your seat belt. It is poisonous, it is ignorant, and it is low class.

As I explained above, most people with disabilities are actually more capable than a normal human because of their advantageous ways of making peoples' days and unknowingly changing lives. Hang out with a handicapped person, even if it is just for a day. I can one hundred percent guarantee you will bite your tongue next time you go to use the term out of context.

Hopefully you at least think of my friend, who in my book is a hero, a champion and an overcomer. Don't use the “R Word". You are way too good for that. Stand up and correct someone today.

Cover Image Credit: Kaitlin Murray

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First-Generation Kids of Brown Parents Are Bridging the Gap Between 'Traditional' and 'Modern'

Speaking as a first-generation child of Indian parents, it's going to be a rough and rocky road for us all.

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I didn't realize or think about what it would be like being the first generation in my entire lineage to live in a country other than India. It just never occurred to me that this was a bigger deal than I thought it was. Yes, I would be living on the opposite side of the world than most my family members, such as my grandparents. But growing up in this country with parents that grew up in India, this is more than just a geographical distance between my family members and I.

My parents left India and came to the United States to ensure that their children (my brother and I) would have more opportunities and live a better life. That kind of transition is definitely not easy because they had to abandon their home, their language, their family, and their country to come to a completely foreign land. It required a lot of struggle, sacrifices and a hell of a lot of courage to do this. And I am forever grateful.

But in a way, this is going to be a way more difficult path for my brother and me, along with any other first-generation children of Indian parents. Not in the sense that we will have to uproot our lives to move across the world, but we will have to face a lot of societal and traditional issues. Right now, it seems as if we don't necessarily belong anywhere. We are different from the other people our age whose families immigrated to the U.S. hundreds of years ago. But we are also different from our parents because they cannot relate to us and we cannot relate to them.

While our parents grew up in a land where things are done a certain way and traditional rules must be followed, it is a little different for us. Growing up in a "melting pot" country where there is diversity of race, religion, and thoughts and ideas, we are constantly exposed to new things.

We were always given the freedom to think and say what we believed and wanted. We have a lot more room for expression than our parents or grandparents ever did. But even though our parents came to this country and were exposed to these thoughts, they stuck with the beliefs they always grew up with because it is a part of their identity. For us, it's a little different because we grew up and surrounded ourselves with all kinds of new people and thoughts.

As amazing and expressive it feels to have this freedom, it also makes it more difficult for first-generation kids because we are going to have to stand up to tradition and introduce these new ideas to not only our parents to all of society. These ideas include dating and love marriages, the extent of religious beliefs and our own faith in God, how to raise kids, distribution of responsibilities in a family where both the husband and wife work, etc.

Our families have done things a certain way for generations and generations, and for the first time, this is going to be disrupted. There is going to be a change in tradition, a revolution. And it's going to be us first-generation children of Indian families that are going to have to bridge the gap between "traditional" and "modern." It's going to be a difficult road, but in the end, it will be worth it because our future kids will have a more open-minded family and society to be a part of.

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