Canada And America: 8 Differences Between The Two Countries

Canada And America: 8 Differences Between The Two Countries

Canadians and Americans are not as similar as you thought
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When people find out that I'm Canadian-American, their reaction is always the same. They make jokes about saying "eh" or demand that I pronounce the word "about" with the stereotypical accent." It’s actually quite entertaining. Sometimes I like to tell my fellow Americans to say the phrases “huh” or “nuh uh.”

Some people say Canada is just like going across the United States. But despite what they say, believe it or not, there are many subtle, but major differences between the two nations. Allow me to introduce them:

1. The people

It may sound hard to believe, but there is definitely a difference between the two people. And I am not talking about the accents (which I will cover in a minute). I’m talking about the people and their behaviors.

In general (and no I am not trying to stereotype), Canadians are a more reserved people. Of course, there is that stereotype of being really nice, which can sometimes be true. Nice does not necessarily mean they're looking to be best friends with every stranger they meet. They are friendly when you meet them, but they don’t open up too much. I’m not the only one who said it. Just ask President Obama who said, “Our Canadian friends can be more reserved, more easy going.” That’s probably the best way of describing it. Reserved, but easygoing. This can sometimes come across as cold, and that’s because it is.

Canadians are also a more passive people. To the contrary, Americans, as Obama also said, are more boisterous. They are louder, more aggressive people. You feel their presence. But at the same time, they're also warmer and more likely to go in for a hug instead of a handshake when meeting you. So despite the stereotype, Americans are, as a whole, much more welcoming than their Canadian counterparts. Of course, there are always exceptions to the rule. Some say Canadians are extremely nice. The only difference is Canadians aren’t as blunt in their remarks and feelings towards others. However, this doesn’t make them nicer people.

2. The food.

This is major. What is on the lame flag (it isn’t exactly cool) of Canada? A maple leaf. What is Toronto’s hockey team called? The Toronto Maple Leafs. Maple is the epitome of Canada. So the same goes with Canadian food. Whether it's maple syrup or maple cola, there is plenty of maple flavored foods and beverages to choose from.

Canadians are also known for eating poutine, which consists of French fries with gravy and cheese. Potato chips are also different in Canada. Canadians are known for having ketchup chips and all-dressed chips which are a combination of barbecue, tomato, salt, vinegar, sour cream, and onions. Some other classic Canadian foods are smoked meat and beaver tails (fried dough shaped like a beaver tail with candy and chocolate on top).

Americans, on the other hand, eat S’mores, buffalo wings, and hot dogs. Of course, this is all offered in Canada, but it's originally American.

3. Sports.

This is an obvious one. Canadians love hockey and Americans love basketball (invented by a Canadian), baseball, and football. All great games to watch and play. Canadians play hockey, watch hockey, have hockey on their currency, and overall Surprisingly, however, basketball has overtaken hockey in Canada as the most popular sport! Hard to believe right? Personally, I still think hockey tops them all but football is a close second.

4. Entertainment

There is simply a lot more to do in the United States. That’s almost as factual as it is opinionated. I once went to a Greek restaurant where my family told the waiter we now live in New York but grew up in Canada. We asked him what we should do since we hadn’t been there in a while and he told us to check out a local park. Sad, right? When we told him we lived just near the city, he said, “Here I am telling you to go to the park when you’re living in the best city ever.” If you don’t believe it, then see it for yourself. With the exception of Quebec (which is similar to France), all Canadian cities are essentially the same: boring and plain. All there is to do is drink beer, eat good food and watch hockey. That gets old after a while. And to the Americans who say Toronto is just like New York, you just want something different. There’s far more to do in New York than Toronto. It doesn’t even come close.

5. Milks

As hilarious as it sounds, it is true that Canadians drink milk out of bags. It’s better for the environment (uses less raw materials) than carton milk and more cost efficient (cheaper to make plastic bags) than using cartons. However, it is also much more difficult to open. To open the bags of milk, one must use a clipper and make sure that the milk does not spill. This is a bit of a challenge, and I have about 50 percent success rate.

6. School.

In Canada, there is no middle school. Students go to elementary until the seventh grade where they go to high school through 12th grade. After that, they go to college. In Quebec, however, students finish high school after the 11th grade and then go to vocational school (called CEGEP) for two years. After completing those two years, they may go on to college.

In the United States, children go to elementary through fifth grade, then middle school through eighth grade, and finally, high school through the 12th grade. After that, they may go on to college to pursue their careers.

7. Accents and catch phrases.

Everyone knows Canadians say “eh” after nearly every sentence. Are there any Canadian catch phrases you may ask? In fact, there are many. One would think Canada has its own language. For example, Canadians call munchkins “Timbits” which can be found at Tim Hortons (the Dunkin Donuts of Canada). Canadians also say “washroom” instead of “bathroom” and “dart” instead of “idiot”. Of course, there are plenty more but then I would have to teach you a language.

8. Currency.

Canada is well known for having its distinct currency. Each interval of dollar bills are differentiated by color. The five-dollar bill is blue, the ten-dollar bill is purple, the twenty-dollar bill is green and so on. Change is also different in Canada. Pennies are no longer in circulation, and instead of the American dollar bill, Canadians use loonies (one-dollar coins) and toonies (two-dollar coins). I would argue Canadian currency is far more attractive than American currency, being that it is easier to distinguish between the between a five-dollar bill or ten-dollar bill than it is in the U.S. and there is simply a much more unique design.


Cover Image Credit: Huffington Post
Cover Image Credit: Huffington Post

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How To Play 'New Girl's' True American Drinking Game

"It's 75% drinking, 20% Candy Land, and the floor is molten lava."
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I think it's fair to say that anyone who watches New Girl knows about True American. This crazy, non-sense drinking game which pops up every so often throughout the seasons and first introduced in Season 1 Episode 20.

The game, as described by New Girl character and fan-favorite Schmidt, is 75% drinking game and 20% Candy Land with a floor of molten lava.

The point of the game is for players to navigate through the Candy Land-like spaces to the "castle," which is a table in the center of the room that holds beer "pawns" and the "king" bottle. The first person to reach and sip from the bottle wins.

SEE ALSO: 15 Things "New Girl" Fans Know to Be True

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Here's how to play:

Step #1: Prepare the "castle"

First, set up your "castle." The castle is made up of beer "pawns" and the "king," a bottle filled with the alcohol of your choice.

The bottle should be in the middle of the table, surrounded by four lines of beer pawns. There is no exact number of beers necessary for each line of beer pawns. Choose any amount of beers that seems appropriate for the amount of players.

Step #2: Set up spaces

Set up spaces using pillows, chairs or any other objects players will be able to stand on. Place an equal amount of spaces around the table. You'll want about 5-8 spaces on each side, depending on the size of the room you're playing in.

Only four of these spaces should reach the castle, lining up with the parade of beer "pawns" and allowing players to take a beer pawn from the castle. For example, in the photo above, each of the chairs touch a corner of the table at the end of the line of beer pawns. Therefore, these are two of the four special spaces that allow players to take a beer. Unlike the pillows pictured, which are just regular spaces that the players can use to move around.

Step #3: Pick teams

Teams are optional. To pick teams, all of the players will place a certain number (1-5) of fingers against their forehead on the count of three.

Any players who hold up the same number are a team. Unmatched players can team up as needed or simply pair up with the person standing closest to them.

Step #4: Begin

Begin with a shotgun "tip-off" to determine which player goes first.

The winner of this shotgunning contest will yell, "One, two, three...JFK!" to announce the official beginning of the game. All players will enthusiastically respond, "FDR!" then quickly grab a beer pawn from the castle and run to any space they wish to start at, excluding for the four special spaces that reach the castle.

Step #5: Make moves

The winner of the shotgunning contest has earned the first turn. From then on, the order of turns will move in a clockwise rotation. During each turn, the player will move one space toward the castle and choose to play one of the following mini-games.

Mini-game number one: the player whose turn it is will count to three then all players will place a certain number (1-5) of fingers on their forehead. Any player who selects a number no one else selected can move ONE space.

Mini-game number two: the player whose turn it is will recite the beginning of a famous American quote. The first player to complete the quote can move TWO spaces.

Mini-game number three: the player whose turn it is will name two famous American people, places or things. The first player to identify what the two have in common can move THREE spaces.

For example, say it's your turn. You will move one space then choose one of the three mini-games. You and all of the players will participate in that game, and the winner will move accordingly. After this, your turn is over and it's the next player's turn (in the original clockwise rotation).

Step #6: "Play on, playa."



Continue playing by these rules until one lucky winner reaches the bottle and sips from its royal glass.

The bottle cannot be opened until every last pawn is removed from the castle. Any players who fail to keep at least one beer in hand, who accidentally end up with more than three beers in hand, or who touch the lava are immediately disqualified. Disqualified players can rejoin the game by shotgunning a beer.

Congratulations!

You are now able to impress all of your New Girl-loving friends with knowledge of the workings of the epic True American drinking game. Know your limits, drink responsibly and enjoy!

Cover Image Credit: i.amz.mshcdn.com

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I'm Spilling The Tea: Here's Where You Can Find The Best Chai Lattes In North Carolina

Here's my roundup of the best chai lattes in town, from one tea drinker to another.

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I'll always choose tea over coffee, especially if it's a well-made chai latte. There's something intrinsically comforting about the drink's frothy texture and smooth spice blend, something that reminds me of Starbucks runs on snowy days and relaxing with a warm mug before bed. Chai delivers just enough punch to push you over that mid-afternoon slump, but not so much that you feel sick. I recently got my friends addicted to the drink because once you try it, there's no going back. Here's where you can find the best chai lattes in North Carolina.

1. The Oak House - Elon, NC

http://projects.elonnewsnetwork.com/bestof/food.html

The Oak House's chai lattes are sweet, spiced, and everything nice. The cafe is a coffee shop by day and a bar by night, but is always perfect study space if you need a little pick-me-up.

2. Perennial - Chapel Hill, NC

https://www.yelp.com/biz/perennial-chapel-hill-2

Perennial's chai is on the spicier end but is toned down by the sweetness of this cafe. It's an entirely Instagramable space, so sit back, relax, and watch the likes roll in.

3. The Green Bean - Greensboro, NC

https://downtowngreensboro.org/listings/the-green-bean/

Although The Green Bean looks like a traditional cafe on the outside, the vibrant murals and lively atmosphere inside are anything but. If you like a creamier chai latte, stop here the next time you're in Greensboro.

4. Liberty Coffee House - Asheville, NC

https://www.tripadvisor.co.za/LocationPhotoDirectLink-g60742-d10260607-i206056654-Liberty_House_Coffee_and_Cafe-Asheville_North_Carolina.html

Liberty's chai lattes are as aesthetic as they are delicious. These artisanal teas are sure to warm you up on even the coldest of days.

5. Starbucks - Almost Anywhere, NC

https://nypost.com/2017/07/08/why-anti-starbucks-hipsters-sound-a-lot-like-trump-supporters/

When all else fails, Starbucks is always a safe bet. Pro tip: ask the barista to make your chai latte without water. There's almost no difference in cost, but your drink is made with double the flavor.

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