8 Things Black People Do That Make White People Uncomfortable

8 Things Black People Do That Make White People Uncomfortable

Whypipo need safe spaces too.

35
views

I recently came across a social media post about how black people living their lives sometimes tend to leave white people feeling uncomfortable. I decided to explore this a bit and set some things straight.

1. Have discussions where topics that highlight our differences come up.

Rawpixel

Dear White people,

No one is attempting to make you feel bad for being white. If you feel guilty about something, that has absolutely everything to do with your own self.

Now,

There are two types of people in this world. The happy-go-lucky who live on clouds where everything is sunshine and rainbows, and those who see the reality of the world because they recognize that our cultures, family histories, and current social standing shape who we are and solidify our personal differences.

We are not all the same. Black people and white people do not walk through life the same way, neither to women and men or even black women and black men.

You are just going to have to accept that in certain conversations, our differences might come up.

2. Mention white privilege.

Austin Distel

White privilege does not mean that white people don't or can't lead hard lives; it means that the fact that you are white did not contribute to it.

White privilege is often described through the lens of Peggy McIntosh's 1988 essay "White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack." The contents of the essay, while it offers great examples of white privilege in everyday life, has often been brushed it off as just matters of inconvenience --- being able to go into a department store and find "nude" pantyhose in your skin tone, for example (because the cosmetics industry decided that "nude" was a single pale color.)

One thing white people often do is interpret having their privilege called out as being told they are a racist. And while privilege exists because of racism, the point is that they need to realize that their privilege allows them to influence systematic decisions.

The easiest way to not feel uncomfortable when the topic comes up it to understand the privilege you do have and to use it in a positive way at every opportunity.

3. Not want to be their friend.

Hain Oliveira

It's a fact of life, not everyone is going to want to be your friend, and that will almost definitely include black people. Here are the two reasons, 1. shooting your friend shot is simply hard to do in general and 2. a good amount of black people are indeed cautious of making white friends.

Why are black people cautious about making white friends? Well, for one, the topic of race WILL come up at some point, and chances are that you're gonna say some fuk shit that has us questioning how you "truly" view us, and for seconds, we never EVER want to be the "token black friend."

4. Act as if we are "owed" something.

Rui Silvestre

We are. Common courtesy, same as everyone.

We aren't asking you to change what happened in the past, we are asking you to change how you treat us NOW. Yes, monetary reparations would be nice, seeing as how other groups have received them, but most Africans Americans have accepted that this simply won't happen.

What is being asked for is an end to racial stereotypes and biases, fairness in the justice system, adequate representation in government and the breaking down of institutionalized racism.

5. Post about "wypipo" on social media.

Which of course prompt the "not all!" exclamations.

But here the rule of thumb, if it applies to you, take it in and learn something. If it doesn't apply to you, then there's no reason to be upset.

Unless you generally think POC and black people, in particular, are making up all of their day-to-day hassles that result or are made worse by the color of their skin, then it's probably safe to say that you are either completely oblivious or completely delusional or maybe a winning combination of both.

6. Have our own social "groups."

Julian Howard

I know the feeling of being excluded, and so do all black people. Our response, however, wasn't to pout (for long,) but to make spaces for ourselves in a world that would not allow us into theirs.

We have our "black is beautiful" FB groups, award shows like the NAACP awards, black cohorts, and networks, as well as universities and clubs because for so long, we weren't allowed to the mainstream versions. Even now, black people continue to be shut out or walk into certain spaces, just to realize they are the only black person there.

You don't have a right to a hurt feeling, not this time.

7. Use AAVE, or other ethnic dialects.

First of all, it's none of your business. Second of all, there is nothing wrong with being able to code switch. Our accents and dialect are a direct result of the communities, ETHNIC COMMUNITIES, that we were raised to be a part of. Which goes back to my first point of "differences." There is not a single legitimate reason as to why everyone in an English speaking community (or any community for that matter) should be forced to speak or expected to speak standard English, a dialect itself of traditional English.

What the real issue seems to be is "inclusion," as many white people seem to feel left out when they are unable to speak or understand a particular dialect or variation. Which, again, is a personal problem.

8. Be easily offended.

Eye For Ebony

We aren't, but many none black people are easily offended. In 2019, less and less is becoming acceptable, and your non-ability to change will become more and more of a problem for you.

As a general rule, using the plight of minority groups, black people in particular, as a punchline, will always be offensive and incredibly inappropriate.

I guarantee you that POC, and black people, in particular, are made to feel uncomfortable in our own spaces every single day...and we have an actual reason to be.

Popular Right Now

Christopher Columbus: Villain

Columbus Day, celebrating a murderer.
20705
views

When we celebrate Columbus Day we are celebrating a great man, the man who discovered America, right? Wrong. We are celebrating a barbarian. We are celebrating a grand thief, a perpetrator of genocide, a racist, a destroyer of culture, a rapist, a torturer, and a murderer of millions. Christopher Columbus was not some innocent, bright-eyed, brave mariner, he was America's first terrorist.

Native Americans discussed Columbus' Exploration.

Now, for many people, this comes as a shock. Our education system teaches children from a very young age that Columbus was a hero. Books and movies have been published showing such an idealistic version of this man. This is a continuous problem.

We have all heard “In 1492 Columbus sailed the ocean blue…," a rhyme that has been passed down for generations.

We are taught that he was the first of many things, for example, he was apparently the first person to believe the world was round! Such an abstract new thought from Columbus' head, except that most if not all educated Europeans already knew this. Out of all the firsts that Columbus was known for, we are not taught about him being the first European mass murderer in America.

Columbus seemed to be in denial.

We are not taught many traits of our beloved American hero. For instance, although Columbus Day is celebrated all across the United States, Columbus never set foot in what is now the U.S.A, he instead landed in Haiti. Columbus went to sea in hopes of finding a shorter route from Spain to India, he later stumbled upon a land inhabited by millions of people yet he declared he discovered it.

After finding out these people were not from India he still decided to call them Indians, opposed to their true name, Tainos.

What later unraveled was a manic hunt for gold at whatever cost. Columbus killed 250,000 Natives, and after 50 years none were left. Disregarding the Natives true name was just the beginning of the destruction of their culture which later lead to the eradication of this truly unique tribe.

*The tale of Christopher Columbus gets more gruesome, read further at your own discretion.*

Americas First Serial Killer

Columbus was kindly greeted by the Natives who offered him gifts. He saw this as ignorance that he could make a profit off of. Although Columbus did not find the silk of India, he did find that most of the natives wore gold. And what later followed was the enslaving of the Natives.

In his own journal Columbus says, "...They were well-built, with good bodies and handsome features... They do not bear arms, and do not know them, for I showed them a sword, they took it by the edge and cut themselves out of ignorance... They would make fine servants... With fifty men we could subjugate them all and make them do whatever we want."

He saw this as an opportunity to sell these men and to take advantage of them.

In order to use them for profit, he later described them as, "savage cannibals, with dog-like noses that drink the blood of their victims." The cannibal story is taught as a fact in some of today's schools! Columbus reported to the Queen that the land he stumbled upon was filled with Natives for slaves and mountains of gold, although this was not the case.

This idea pleased the Queen and she gave Columbus 17 ships and 1,200 men for his next expedition. His second voyage was riddled with complications and proved to be far less profitable than they were hoping.

Presenting the New Property to the Queen.

Columbus was known to work the Natives to death in the gold mines. The natives who were over 14 were required to hand Columbus a thimble of gold dust every three months. If they did not Columbus would cut their hands off and tie them around their neck until they bled out.

More than 10,000 people died handless. Columbus wanted as much gold as he could posses, he believed if you owned gold you owned everything you needed in the world.

During Columbus's first trip to the Caribbean, he left 39 men who would help themselves to Native women. When he returned with 1,200 soldiers, rape and pillaging became the norm. One of Columbus's men wrote in his journal about one of the female gifts that Columbus had given him to rape.

He documents, "having taken her into my cabin, she being naked according to their custom, I conceived desire to take pleasure. I wanted to put my desire into execution but she did not want it and treated me with her finger nails in such a manner that I wished I had never begun. But seeing that (to tell you the end of it all), I took a rope and thrashed her well, for which she raised such unheard of screams that you would not have believed your ears. Finally we came to an agreement in such manner that I can tell you that she seemed to have been brought up in a school of harlots."

Columbus would provide his men with sex slaves. He said himself that girls the age of 9-10 were in high demand. He and his men would raid villages for sex and sport. Columbus, in regards to his sex slave trade, wrote, "A hundred castellanoes are as easily obtained for a woman as for a farm, and it is very general and there are plenty of dealers who go about looking for girls; those from nine to ten are now in demand."

This is still a simplistic version of what happened.

The sex slave industry that Columbus had created wasn't the only atrocious act he committed. Columbus and his men would test the sharpness of their blades by cutting the Natives in half. They also beheaded them and threw them into vats of boiling soap. Columbus and his men would lift infants from their mother's breasts to be thrown headfirst into large rocks.

Butcher shops were placed all around the Caribbean. Columbus and his men would use the Natives as dog food. They also would feed live babies to the fierce armored dogs.

This is just an overview of the horrendous actions our "beloved American hero" took part in. By celebrating Columbus Day what we are really celebrating is Taino Genocide Day. We are condoning this barbarians actions.

We should change what we celebrate during fall break. Instead of celebrating Columbus day we should remember the victims of Columbus's exploration. We should celebrate Indigenous Peoples Day, like California does. Columbus was a villain, we should not get any days off because of this terrible, terrible man.

Cover Image Credit: Biography

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

Black History Month Spotlight: Remembering Ida B. Wells

Before Rosa Parks, there was Ida. B Wells

3
views

When considering American history and the many Americans we have labeled as heroes, our minds often rush to the names we have read about in textbooks since childhood. Normally when asked about American heroes, automatically we think about George Washington, Martin Luther King Jr., John F Kennedy, Henry Ford, and so on.

All of these icons have left a prominent impact on our country in different ways. I admire the work all of these figures have done for America, however, my hero is one that I can connect with on a more personal level. She is not a name mentioned in most elementary textbooks. She is a hidden figure with an inspiring story, a pioneer for not only women but also women of color. Her name is Ida B. Wells.

Ida B. Wells was an esteemed journalist, researcher, and activist in the late 19th century. Born into slavery, her life was not destined for greatness. However, after the Civil War ended, Ida and her family were declared free by the Emancipation Proclamation. But, living in the south during this time was not easy.

Facing racial prejudice and discriminatory practices at every corner of her life, Wells took it upon herself to expose what was really happening in the south during this time. Being a former educator, she took to writing and investigative reporting, displaying the horrors of the frequent lynching and mob violence that took place.

I consider Ida B. Wells a hero of mine because her work shed light on real issues that were happening and uncovered the hard truth. As a budding journalist, I have so much respect for Wells and her courage and strength. Ida refused to leave people in the dark because keeping people from hard-hitting news is bad journalism.

While learning about her in my journalism class last semester, my professor told us Frederick Douglas claimed that if it wasn't for her research, he wouldn't have believed the stigma around white men raping black women. According to The Guardian, "she destroyed the mainstream media's narratives that suggested lynching victims were criminals," and in 1894, the New York Times was very critical of Wells because she broke down stereotypical barriers and influenced the thoughts of many Americans.

What we think about the world today is often skewed by media representation. It is up to us to determine if the information we are receiving is true and accurate. I look up to Ida B. Wells because she asked herself about the possible misconceptions that were happening around her, and sought to fix it. She was a skeptic and refused to give into societal norms.

She taught me that just because I am a woman, and a woman of color does not mean that I have to let society make the rules for me. I have learned that journalism is a sacred mission to make society better. Ida B. Wells not only made society better but more aware and conscious of the media they consume. She is a hero, pioneer, and social icon. For young journalists everywhere, she is a name to remember.

Related Content

Facebook Comments