Bisexuality And Pansexuality Are The Same Thing

Bisexuality And Pansexuality Are The Same Thing

A suitable rant for today's society

JordynL
JordynL
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Before I begin, I do have friends that identify as homosexual, bisexual, heterosexual, and transgender. They all know how I feel about this issue and understand. The majority happens to agree, which I think is interesting and fantastic.

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In today's society, it seems that everyone needs their own title to feel special and significant. They don't want to be caught in a loop that isn't "theirs" or be associated with something that they are, in fact, definitely associated with. Sexual identities, sexualities, and genders are a GIGANTIC factor with this issue because people are finding more obscure ways to explain things so they are able to feel like an individual.

Back in the less complicated days, there were homosexual, bisexual, and heterosexual people; plain and simple. One was attracted to the same sex, one was attracted to both men and women, and the other was attracted to the opposite sex. But now, there's all these different sexual categories that are honestly unnecessary and just cause meaningless confusion. Confusion arises when most sexualities are literally the same thing, but people don't want to see it that way. Examples? Bisexuality and Pansexuality.

By definition, bisexuality is the romantic, sexual, and emotional attraction/sexual behavior toward both males and females, or romantic and sexual attraction to people of any sex or gender identity; the latter aspect is sometimes alternatively termed pansexuality.

By definition, pansexuality (or omnisexuality--i.e. also the same thing by the way) is the sexual, romantic, and emotional attraction towards people regardless of their sex or gender identity. Pansexual people may refer to themselves as gender-blind, including people that are outside the gender binary; a branch of bisexuality.

Both have attraction to any sex or gender identity; men, women, transgender. Literally the only difference is that pansexual people can be attracted to non-binary people, which still are biological men and women, and/or recognize more than two genders. But after all, THERE ARE ONLY TWO GENDERS.

Yes, trans people have their own title and I won't argue that. But where this is concerned, they are transitioning from one biological sex to the other.

Same concept.

Bisexuality is the overall term. Pansexuality is an unnecessary branch of bisexuality. They are the same thing.

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My Asexuality Is The Last Thing I Hate About Myself

Oh, by the way - mom and dad, I'm Ace!
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This week my fellow UCF Odyssey writer and asexual Chris Mari wrote an article explaining his asexuality and his complete detest for it. He goes into detail about how is sexual orientation developed, what it is, and how he feels about how it affects his relationships. It is a really insightful article about the accepting process of discovering your own sexuality.

However, I feel like Chris is taking this the wrong way. Being asexual, or any sexuality for that matter, is nothing to be ashamed of and you should never hate yourself for it. It took me a while to figure it out and it took me even longer to accept it. But once I did, my life, relationships, and my view on my asexuality got better. I don't see it as a curse or a disease. I see it as being a part of the awesome person I am (not to brag).

There are many things that I don't like about myself, but my sexuality is not one of them. I hate that I am messy, that I like to mix all of the fountain drinks into one cup, and that I am a terrible driver. I do not hate the fact that I am a five-foot-two asexual woman who eats a lot of pasta.

To be clear, like most sexualities asexuality has a spectrum with different attraction levels and variances between each individual. There are many types of asexuality and each type varies on sexual orientation, lack of sexual attraction, and romantic orientation, which is completely different from sexual orientation. At its core, being asexual means that you lack sexual attraction to others, have low sexual desire, and never initiate sexual activity.

Asexuality means many things to many different people. You can still be in a sexual relationship with someone and still consider yourself to be asexual. You can be attracted to others and still have romantic relationships and still be asexual. It does not have to confine you, your relationship, or you sex/non-sex life.

Unlike Chris, I figured out my asexuality as a teen. Around my senior year in high school, I noticed that I wasn't experiencing the same feelings towards sex and sexual desire as a lot of my friends. For a long time, I thought that there was something wrong with me. I blamed it on me being "too mature" for relationships in high school, and that "all the guys in my grade were unattractive." Which, by the way, was not true.

It wasn't until I started Googling these question I had that I found out what the issue was. I am asexual. And it wasn't until the first relationship I had that I realized I was more of a gray-asexual than strictly asexual. I sometimes feel sexual attraction to others, but only when a strong emotional connection is formed, and even then my sexual attraction is little to none.

Having sex does not mean having a relationship and having a relationship does not mean having sex. Trust me, I know. A romantic relationship is built on a strong emotional connection, respect, and intimacy, which does not necessarily mean sex. My past relationships were built on strong emotional connections and mutual respect. Sometimes there have been feeling of sexual attraction, but in a lot of cases, there weren't. If/when I am in a relationship, there is a lot of emotional intimacy, caring, and a lot more Netflix binging than in most non-asexual relationships.

Chris, it sounds like you are still dealing with the fact that you are asexual. And let me tell you, from my own experience, once you accept it your feelings towards it won't be so negative. There is an entire community of people like you and I that understand what you are going through. But this is something that you shouldn't hate yourself for.

Being asexual does not mean you are broken, have a disease, and are not capable of being in a relationship. If you surround yourself with accepting people, accept who you are as a person, and find that person who loves you for who you are and not your asexuality, then you will see how awesome it is to be who you are meant to be. Trust me, it's good to be part of the plus! We give it that extra credit!

Cover Image Credit: Jon Ly

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Family Is About Love, Not Genetics

Your family is not who you are born into, it's who you find.

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We are finally over Thanksgiving, the biggest day for family meals and reunions all year long. While everyone seems to love the meal part, everyone always seems to get caught up on the family part. If you look at Twitter or Instagram around the holidays, your feed will be clogged with memes of "Thanksgiving clapbacks" of responses to the snappy comments of relatives. However, while these memes are hilarious, these memes become far too real for people that are ostracized by their family every year.

The Thanksgiving Clapback memes make fun of the rude, mundane comments we all hate to hear from our distant relatives. Treading over passive-aggressive statements about our relationships, education, jobs, and so much more.

While these are hilarious, they touch on a much more real and depressing issue. Every year, while we are annoyed by the rude comments of our relatives, so many people are constantly being shunned away from their families because of their sexual orientation, gender identity, political beliefs, religious beliefs, and so many other superficial issues.

Family is supposed to be the group around you that loves you and accepts you unconditionally. Because of that, your family doesn't simply have to be the relatives you are born into. In fact, the opposite is often true. While some relatives are absolutely wonderful and give unconditional love, far too many will focus on benign details and cling to views that make them willing to reject their so-called "family." This is not what a family should be at all. A family would never reject you for personal reasons. Family never stops loving, no matter the circumstance, trials, or personal beliefs.

Because of this, it is important to find your family, not just take the one you are born into. Find the people that will love you no matter. Find the people that will always be there to support you. Find those people that will accept you for who you are. Most importantly, love those people, accept those people, and support those people equally. Finding friends is one thing, but finding your family is the most important thing for your emotional health.

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