10 Ways To Be A Better Student That Take Literally Zero Effort
Start writing a post
Student Life

10 Ways To Be A Better Student That Take Literally Zero Effort

87
10 Ways To Be A Better Student That Take Literally Zero Effort

Are you having a rough day? Feeling unproductive, or even unsuccessful? Good news: I've compiled a list of small, manageable, bite-size things to change about your habits to make you a better student. Using these will make you a more efficient student who works smarter and uses their resources. You'll be surprised at the big results from these small changes.

1. Utilize nonverbal communication.

Unsplash

When the professor asks a question, nod your head yes or shake your head no. Every time. Your nonverbal communication tells him or 1) if you are engaged and 2) if you understand the content. When you don't understand something, go ahead-- scrunch up your eyebrows and look like you totally don't get it. Your professor WILL pick up on it and probably explain again. You can get a lot of your needs met without even speaking.

2. Snag a good seat.

Unsplash

On the first day of classes of any new semester, arrive at least 15 minutes early to get a good seat. Arrive and scan the room for the following: a nearby outlet, good lighting, easy door access, and view of the prof.

3. Address the professor correctly.

Unsplash

If you don't know what to call your professor, look at his/her/their email signature. If it's just a first name, odds are the professor is comfortable being addressed as such. If it's Dr. _______, you absolutely should use the formal title. You'll be able to avoid a ton of sticky situations this way. You can also Google your professor, and often you can find a LinkedIn or university biography that will provide those sweet, sweet letters of Ph.D. if he/she/they are a doctor.

4. Take a very short break.

Unsplash

If you're having trouble focusing during class, or if you're feeling overwhelmed and stressed, take one (1) minute to breathe. Look at an analog clock, think about nothing, and simply watch the second hand go around. Just once. By the time 60 seconds have passed, you'll have given your brain a moment to recuperate and reset.

5. Ask smart questions.

Unsplash

If you are confused about the relevance of what you're learning, or if you just want brownie points, ask the following: "What are the implications of this concept in a [business/clinical/teaching/professional/etc.] setting?" It will likely provide some clarity on whether what you are learning is important for your career or if you can forget about it after you take the test. Alternatively, if you totally weren't paying attention for the past three minutes of lecture, ask, "could you please clarify _______ again?" It sounds like you're asking for a better explanation instead of just saying, "I'm sorry, I didn't catch that."

6. Stay organized.

Unsplash

Keep a running log of your extracurriculars, jobs, and leadership positions. It's kind of like an extended resume. When you are filling out grad school or scholarship applications, it's so much easier to refer to this list instead of racking your brain for what you did first semester of freshman year. It can also be helpful to have a "stump speech" of sorts on hand for scholarship applications. Once you fill out your first "Why do you deserve this scholarship?" essay, SAVE IT so you can tweak and reuse it for the future.

7. Own two of everything.

Unsplash

Have a duplicate of every single item you need or use in a day in your backpack. That way, you'll never forget anything at your house. This includes--but is not limited to--headphones, toothbrush, cell/laptop charger, gloves, house key, deodorant, sunglasses, whatever. You'll thank me.

8. Become an email superhero.

Unsplash

This skill looks different for everyone: for me, I close every email with "Best," followed by my email signature. I pin anything that needs to get done and copy everything down onto a paper calendar. Whatever it takes, stay organized with your university email. Pro tip: many universities automatically put all students, faculty, and staff into your contacts. If you don't know the first or last name of someone, search that (monster) list and you can find it in a snap.

9. Take advantage of interlibrary loans.

Unsplash

Need a textbook? Some pleasure reading? An obscure research article? The campus library will save your butt, every time. Many state library systems provide a service where they will deliver (for free) any book or material that you need, and you can check it out just like a regular library book. Sometimes, you can even renew them for several weeks. I have gone full semesters having borrowed a free textbook from miles and miles away.

10. Turn on night light filters all day long.

Unsplash

Most laptops and cell phones provide a night mode filter, which removes some of the blue frequencies and makes everything look a little warmer and yellower. It's way more pleasant to look at, and is much easier on the eyes. Turn it on and keep it on, and you won't feel as much eye strain.

Now get to the grind!

Report this Content
This article has not been reviewed by Odyssey HQ and solely reflects the ideas and opinions of the creator.
Being Invisible The Best Super Power

The best superpower ever? Being invisible of course. Imagine just being able to go from seen to unseen on a dime. Who wouldn't want to have the opportunity to be invisible? Superman and Batman have nothing on being invisible with their superhero abilities. Here are some things that you could do while being invisible, because being invisible can benefit your social life too.

Keep Reading...Show less
houses under green sky
Photo by Alev Takil on Unsplash

Small towns certainly have their pros and cons. Many people who grow up in small towns find themselves counting the days until they get to escape their roots and plant new ones in bigger, "better" places. And that's fine. I'd be lying if I said I hadn't thought those same thoughts before too. We all have, but they say it's important to remember where you came from. When I think about where I come from, I can't help having an overwhelming feeling of gratitude for my roots. Being from a small town has taught me so many important lessons that I will carry with me for the rest of my life.

Keep Reading...Show less
​a woman sitting at a table having a coffee
nappy.co

I can't say "thank you" enough to express how grateful I am for you coming into my life. You have made such a huge impact on my life. I would not be the person I am today without you and I know that you will keep inspiring me to become an even better version of myself.

Keep Reading...Show less
Student Life

Waitlisted for a College Class? Here's What to Do!

Dealing with the inevitable realities of college life.

93863
college students waiting in a long line in the hallway
StableDiffusion

Course registration at college can be a big hassle and is almost never talked about. Classes you want to take fill up before you get a chance to register. You might change your mind about a class you want to take and must struggle to find another class to fit in the same time period. You also have to make sure no classes clash by time. Like I said, it's a big hassle.

This semester, I was waitlisted for two classes. Most people in this situation, especially first years, freak out because they don't know what to do. Here is what you should do when this happens.

Keep Reading...Show less
a man and a woman sitting on the beach in front of the sunset

Whether you met your new love interest online, through mutual friends, or another way entirely, you'll definitely want to know what you're getting into. I mean, really, what's the point in entering a relationship with someone if you don't know whether or not you're compatible on a very basic level?

Consider these 21 questions to ask in the talking stage when getting to know that new guy or girl you just started talking to:

Keep Reading...Show less

Subscribe to Our Newsletter

Facebook Comments