An Open Letter to ALL UMASS Dartmouth Incoming Freshmen

An Open Letter to ALL UMASS Dartmouth Incoming Freshmen

Dear Incoming Freshmen: Welcome to My World.
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Dear freshmen,

As an incoming college freshman, I'm sure you're feeling one of two ways: 1) Oh no... college... this is scary. I won't know anyone, and I'm going to be on my own for the first time. What if I don't know where to go or what to do? My classes are going to be so hard and I'm going to get lost and I should probably just stay home, or... 2) OH MY GOD COLLEGE I CAN'T WAIT TO MOVE IN I FINALLY GET MY OWN SPACE I'M AN ADULT MY DORM IS GONNA BE SO COOL ROOMMATES AND PARTIES AND ADULTING YAY. Either way, college is a new experience that can be life changing for all of us. However, attending college at the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth will provide you an experience like no other.


As an incoming UMASS Dartmouth student, there are a few things you should know upon arrival. Typically, we have more male than female students. We have students representing 43 of the 50 United States, and 48 countries across the globe. We have over 75 undergraduate areas of study, two pre-professional pathways (pre-law and pre-med), and an undeclared track in four different major areas. We have over 150 student run clubs including Greek Life (fraternities and sororities), the Black Student Union, and an a cappella group. There are endless opportunities for student involvement, as well as ample opportunity to create new clubs or groups if we don't already have something that interests you. We are home to a multitude of betterment and awareness organizations including Active Minds, Eovove, and Global Health Collaborative. There are also multiple opportunities for student employment and professional advancement. The university offers many paid positions, work study and other, including library staff, the student activities department (SAIL) and undergraduate teacher's assistants.


You can find all of that information on our school's website. However, what you can't always find on our school's website is the real deal about some of this stuff. This might be the fun stuff, like that you can almost always find a crazy party if you look hard enough, or the not-so-fun stuff, like the fact that you're at least somewhat likely to fail an exam or two during your time on campus. But there's other things that some of us veterans wish we knew when we were walking in your shoes. First, the freshman quad is the least impressive of the living arrangements, but what did you expect as a freshman? You get two parking lots and a volleyball court and us seniors think that makes us even. The dells are.. crazy. To this day, I'm not entirely sure if that's a good thing or a bad thing, but you've been warned. As a freshman, you will more than likely get rejected to at least one party. You'll get over it, and everyone will move on with their lives. No one, and I mean literally not a single person on this campus calls the dining hall "The Marketplace." Short for "residential dining hall," it's res. That's it. Additionally, you don't know anythingggggg until you've had a Rose cookie. One day, you'll meet Rose. You'll eat a Rose cookie. Then you'll know. Networking is crucial. Get yourself out there and meet people, and never burn your bridges. You never gonna know who's help you're going to need one day. We offer hundreds of clubs. Go out of your way to research them and then check them all out at the Corsair Fair. I promise you, you will regret not being more involved as you cross that stage on graduation day (which, even though you like don't even go here yet, is waaaaay closer than you think). Go to those study sessions. These classes are too expensive for you to waste your time retaking them because you dun goofed the first time around. Utilize your resources: books, clubs, the school website, staff, students. If you don't know something, please ask. Any staff or student will gladly direct you. Upperclassmen want you to experience all things that they didn't get the chance to, and they always have the inside scoop. Your RA is your friend, but remember that friendship is a two way street. Most importantly, this isn't high school anymore. This is the real world. This is your world, and it will be whatever you make of it. Now, I know you've all seen the movies, but let me tell you- college is not what you see on television. It is real and it is wonderful. Don't take it for granted. Your time here will fly by. Spend it wisely.


Sincerely,

A Senior

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I'm A Woman And You Can't Convince Me Breastfeeding In Public Is OK In 2019

Sorry, not sorry.

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There's a huge difference between being modest while breastfeeding and just being straight up careless, trashy and disrespectful to those around you. Why don't you try popping out a boob without a baby attached to it and see how long it takes for you to get arrested for public indecency? Strange how that works, right?

So many people talking about it bring up the point of how we shouldn't "sexualize" breastfeeding and seeing a woman's breasts while doing so. Actually, all of these people are missing the point. It's not sexual, it's just purely immodest and disrespectful.

If you see a girl in a shirt cut too low, you call her a slut. If you see a celebrity post a nude photo, you call them immodest and a terrible role model. What makes you think that pulling out a breast in the middle of public is different, regardless of what you're doing with it?

If I'm eating in a restaurant, I would be disgusted if the person at the table next to me had their bare feet out while they were eating. It's just not appropriate. Neither is pulling out your breast for the entire general public to see.

Nobody asked you to put a blanket over your kid's head to feed them. Nobody asked you to go feed them in a dirty bathroom. But you don't need to basically be topless to feed your kid. Growing up, I watched my mom feed my younger siblings in public. She never shied away from it, but the way she did it was always tasteful and never drew attention. She would cover herself up while doing it. She would make sure that nothing inappropriate could be seen. She was lowkey about it.

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There is nothing wrong with feeding your baby. It's something you need to do, it's a part of life. But there is definitely something wrong with thinking it's fine to expose yourself to the entire world while doing it. Nobody wants to see it. Nobody cares if you're feeding your kid. Nobody cares if you're trying to make some sort of weird "feminist" statement by showing them your boobs.

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For Camille, With Love

To my godmother, my second mom, my rooted confidence, my support

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First grade, March. It was my first birthday without my mom. You through a huge party for me, a sleepover with friends from school. It included dress up games and making pizza and Disney trivia. You, along with help from my grandma, threw me the best birthday party a 7-year-old could possibly want.

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You and your sister came out to my 6th grade "graduation". You bought me balloons and made me feel as if moving onto middle school was the coolest thing in the entire world.

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Every single time I saw you, it would light up my entire day, my week. You were more than my godmother, you were my second mom. You understood things that my grandma didn't.

When you married John, you included me in your wedding. I still have that picture of you, Jessica, Aaron and myself on my wall at college. I was so happy for you.

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When I had gotten into UWT, you told me to go there. I did and here I am, succeeding and living my best in Tacoma. I do it for you, because of you.

When I graduated high school and I was able to deliver a speech during our baccalaureate, you cheered me on. You recorded it for me, so I could show people who weren't able to make it to the ceremony. You were one of the few people able to come to my actual graduation. You helped me celebrate the accomplishments and awards from my hard work.

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Now, sitting so far from you away at college just like you wanted me to. I miss you. I wish I was there to say goodbye.

I'll travel the world for you, write lots of stories and books for you, I will live life to the fullest for you.

You are another angel taken too early in life. Please say hello to my parents and grandma in Heaven for me.

Lots of love,

Haiden

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