7 Times Donald Trump Sued Or Threatened To Sue For Stupid Reasons

7 Times Donald Trump Sued Or Threatened To Sue For Stupid Reasons

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On Tuesday, Donald Trump announced that he will be running for president. Although most people know he's a billionaire businessman, you might not know about some the more ridiculous lawsuits he's filed against various people. Below are the crème de la crème.

1. He sued an airport because planes were flying over his house.


In January, Trump filed a lawsuit against Palm Beach County in Florida, accusing the airport of purposely sending air traffic over his mansion and private club. He is suing both the airport and airport director Bruce Pelly for $100 million, the lawsuit claiming, “Pelly’s efforts in this regard are both deliberate and malicious, and motivated by personal animosity towards Donald Trump.” The lawsuit says that Pelly wants revenge on Trump for stopping his airport expansion plans back in 1995. Suing an airport for flying over his house? The lawsuit is pending.

2. He sued an author for understating his net worth



Donald Trump gets angry whenever someone alleges he's not worth as much as he says he is. New York Times reporter Timothy O’Brien found this out the hard way when Trump sued him for $5 billion. In his book, Trump Nation, O’Brien claimed that the mogul was only worth $150 million to $200 million, instead of the alleged $5 billion to $6 billion Trump claims. Trump said that this understating of his worth hurt his reputation and some business deals, The suit was dismissed.

3. He sued Bill Maher for intimating Trump's father is an orangutan.


Apparently Trump doesn’t like comedy because he sued comedian Bill Maher for offering to donate $5 million to charity if Trump could give proof that his father is not a monkey. Or more accurately, to prove that he is not “the spawn of his mother having sex with an orangutan.” The joke was a spoof of Trump's challenge to President Obama to show his birth certificate. Trump retaliated by sending Maher a copy of his birth certificate and told him to pay up, which Maher did not. The Donald sued him, but eventually dropped it.

4. He threatened to sue a man for campaigning to rid Macy’s of him.



In 2013, Angelo Carusone organized an online boycott to end the partnership between Trump and Macy’s. Trump had signed with the department store to be both a spokesperson for the company, along with selling products in the store. The petition was termed the “Dump Trump” petition and has since received hundreds of thousands of signatures. One of the cease-and-desist letters involved in the lawsuit states that Carusone has used “mob-like bullying and coercion” to protest Trump, instead of simply engaging “in lawful protest.” Since Macy’s still supported Trump throughout this ordeal, I’m not sure why he felt the need to sue someone who wasn’t even going to affect his partnership.


5. He threatened to sue Lawrence O'Donnell for claiming he's not worth as much as Trump claims.


In 2011, MSNBC host Lawrence O’Donnell accused Trump of being worth less than $1 billion. In a tweet, Trump said

“I heard, because his show is unwatchable, that ‪@Lawrence has made many false statements last night about me. Maybe I should sue him?”

O’Donnell responded to the threat by saying that he knew Trump’s big secret: “he can’t afford to sue me.” No lawsuit was filed.

6. He sued a Miss USA contestant for speaking ill of the pageant



In 2012, Trump sued Miss USA contestant Sheena Monnin for $5 million for making controversial comments about the pageant. She told her friends on Facebook that the competition was rigged, alleging that the five finalists were selected prior to the actual pageant. The Miss Universe Organization is the name under which the lawsuit was filed, but Trump owns the company in partnership with NBC Universal. A judge ruled in Trump's favor.

7. He threatened to sue Mac Miller for using Trump’s name

in a song


Mac Miller released a song in 2011 titled “Donald Trump” (you can listen to it here). Miller sent Trump a plaque after it became a hit. Trump, however, was not amused, taking to twitter yet again. Trump tweeted to Miller several times, with the ultimate message of wanting money for the song’s success instead of a plaque, and that he was going to teach him “a big boy lesson about lawsuits and finance.” No suit has been filed, and Miller tweeted back saying, “let’s be friends.”

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To The Friends I Won't Talk To After High School

I sincerely hope, every great quality I saw in you, was imprinted on the world.
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Hey,

So, for the last four years I’ve seen you almost everyday. I’ve learned about your annoying little brother, your dogs and your crazy weekend stories. I’ve seen you rock the awful freshman year fashion, date, attend homecoming, study for AP tests, and get accepted into college.

Thank you for asking me about my day, filling me in on your boy drama and giving me the World History homework. Thank you for complimenting my outfits, laughing at me presenting in class and listening to me complain about my parents. Thank you for sending me your Quizlets and being excited for my accomplishments- every single one of them. I appreciate it all because I know that soon I won’t really see you again. And that makes me sad. I’ll no longer see your face every Monday morning, wave hello to you in the hallways or eat lunch with you ever again. We won't live in the same city and sooner or later you might even forget my name.

We didn’t hang out after school but none the less you impacted me in a huge way. You supported my passions, stood up for me and made me laugh. You gave me advice on life the way you saw it and you didn’t have to but you did. I think maybe in just the smallest way, you influenced me. You made me believe that there’s lots of good people in this world that are nice just because they can be. You were real with me and that's all I can really ask for. We were never in the same friend group or got together on the weekends but you were still a good friend to me. You saw me grow up before your eyes and watched me walk into class late with Starbucks every day. I think people like you don’t get enough credit because I might not talk to you after high school but you are still so important to me. So thanks.

With that said, I truly hope that our paths cross one day in the future. You can tell me about how your brothers doing or how you regret the college you picked. Or maybe one day I’ll see you in the grocery store with a ring on your finger and I’ll be so happy you finally got what you deserved so many guys ago.

And if we ever do cross paths, I sincerely hope you became everything you wanted to be. I hope you traveled to Italy, got your dream job and found the love of your life. I hope you have beautiful children and a fluffy dog named Charlie. I hope you found success in love before wealth and I hope you depended on yourself for happiness before anything else. I hope you visited your mom in college and I hope you hugged your little sister every chance you got. She’s in high school now and you always tell her how that was the time of your life. I sincerely hope, every great quality I saw in you, was imprinted on the world.

And hey, maybe I’ll see you at the reunion and maybe just maybe you’ll remember my face. If so, I’d like to catch up, coffee?

Sincerely,

Me

Cover Image Credit: High school Musical

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Pride? Pride.

Who are we? Why are we proud?

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This past week, I was called a faggot by someone close to me and by note, of all ways. The shock rolled through my body like thunder across barren plains and I was stuck paralyzed in place, frozen, unlike the melting ice caps. My chest suddenly felt tight, my hearing became dim, and my mind went blank except for one all-encompassing and constant word. Finally, after having thawed, my rage bubbled forward like divine retribution and I stood poised and ready to curse the name of the offending person. My tongue lashed the air into a frenzy, and I was angry until I let myself break and weep twice. Later, I began to question not sexualities or words used to express (or disparage) them, but my own embodiment of them.

For members of the queer community, there are several unspoken and vital rules that come into play in many situations, mainly for you to not be assaulted or worse (and it's all too often worse). Make sure your movements are measured and fit within the realm of possible heterosexuality. Keep your music low and let no one hear who you listen to. Avoid every shred of anything stereotypically gay or feminine like the plague. Tell the truth without details when you can and tell half-truths with real details if you must. And above all, learn how to clear your search history. At twenty, I remember my days of teaching my puberty-stricken body the lessons I thought no one else was learning. Over time I learned the more subtle and more important lessons of what exactly gay culture is. Now a man with a head and social media accounts full of gay indicators, I find myself wondering both what it all means and more importantly, does it even matter?

To the question of whether it matters, the answer is naturally yes and no (and no, that's not my answer because I'm a Gemini). The month of June has the pleasure of being the time of year when the LGBT+ community embraces the hateful rhetoric and indulges in one of the deadly sins. Pride. Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, the figures at the head of the gay liberation movement, fought for something larger than themselves and as with the rest of the LGBT+ community, Pride is more than a parade of muscular white men dancing in their underwear. It's a time of reflection, of mourning, of celebration, of course, and most importantly, of hope. Pride is a time to look back at how far we've come and realize that there is still a far way to go.

This year marks fifty years since the Stonewall Riots and the gay liberation movement launched onto the world stage, thus making the learning and embracing of gay culture that much more important. The waves of queer people that come after the AIDS crisis has been given the task of rebuilding and redefining. The AIDS crisis was more than just that. It was Death itself stalking through the community with the help of Regan doing nothing. It was going out with friends and your circle shrinking faster than you can try or even care to replenish. Where do you go after the apocalypse? The LGBT+ community was a world shut off from access by a touch of death and now on the other side, we must weave in as much life as we can.

But we can't freeze and dwell of this forever. It matters because that's where we came from, but it doesn't matter because that's not where we are anymore. We're in a time of rebirth and spring. The LGBT+ community can forge a new identity where the AIDS crisis is not the defining feature, rather a defining feature to be immortalized, mourned, and moved on from.

And to the question of what does it all mean? Well, it means that I'm gay and that I've learned the central lesson that all queer people should learn in middle school. It's called Pride for a reason. We have to shoulder the weight of it all and still hold our head high and we should. Pride is the LGBT+ community turning lemons into lemon squares and limoncello. The lemon squares are funeral cakes meant to mourn and be a familiar reminder of what passed, but the limoncello is the extravagant and intoxicating celebration of what is to come. This year I choose to combine the two and get drunk off funeral cakes. Something tells me that those who came before would've wanted me to celebrate.

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