7 Reasons Why Online Shopping Is Better

7 Reasons Why Online Shopping Is Better

It's much more easier for me to sit at home, find what I like and have it delivered to my front door.
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We all love shopping for many reasons. Weather it be shopping for shoes or home appliances or even cars, we all have something we want to buy. Online shopping is easy. I personally think online shopping is better than in-store shopping.

Read my reasons below to find out why I and many others are online shopaholics:

1. More convenient and comfortable

It's much more easier for me to sit at home, find what I like and have it delivered to my front door. You don't have to worry about finding a parking space, or wasting gas. You can just sit home and do all your shopping from any store.

2. You have more options online than in store

It's true. Online shopping gives you a much better variety than in-store, there's a worldwide selection of a specific product than you might want. Also most times many things you find online might not be available in stores.

3. You get to avoid people

Don't you hate when you go out and see someone you know and wish you hadn't left your house? If you're more like me, you like to avoid the crowd and the salespeople when shopping. You can stay home and shop without having to wait in long lines and babies who won't stop crying.

4. Best deals

Online shopping gives you cheaper deals and even discount codes that you can apply. You can select "low to high" and save tons of money if you know what you're doing. Online stores even have their own "sales" or "clearance" sections to shop from.

5. It feels like Christmas when your package arrives

Who doesn't like the feeling of opening up a package. That's honestly the best part for me. It's so exciting when your clothes or whatever you buy arrives. It's more comfortable to try your clothes out at home and if you don't like what you got than it's not to hard to get a refund.

6. Reviews

Online shopping gives you many benefits for reviving the best products. You're able to compare different products and find the right prices. If you don't know if you should buy those jeans, read the reviews to see if other people liked it or not. When you buy things at the stores, you don't get reviews.

7. You can shop anytime of the day

This is another reason why online shopping is better. You can shop even when the store you need to shop at is closed and even if you don't have transportation. You can fit it into your schedule easily.

Sure shopping online has its negative aspects, but the positives overcome the negative. From my perspective, I seem to enjoy it more and if you prefer to shop in person that's fun to, after all, it's shopping!

Cover Image Credit: Pexels

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15 Actual Thoughts You Have While Wandering Around TJ Maxx

God bless TJ Maxx.

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I recently went to TJ Maxx with a friend with the sole purpose of not buying anything. We literally looked at everything, though, and later, I walked out with half a dozen items I was not planning on buying. I'm just glad it was only six from the number of things I saw and liked.

Here were my thoughts as I wandered around TJ Maxx for an hour.

1. "A Michael Kors purse? I wonder how cheap it is..."

2. "Of course I have to check out the clearance section... except that's basically the entire store."

3. "I'm not sure what I would write in a notebook, but these are hella cute."

4. "This may look horrible on me but I'm going to try it on anyway."

5. "Maybe I should just look at some nice clothes for work. You can never have too many business casual clothes..."

6. "These Adidas shoes are so cheap yet still expensive."

7. "$5 makeup... How bad could it be?"

8. "American Eagle shorts for only $15?!"

9. "I can't carry all this stuff."

10. "Do I have a giftcard?"

11. "I want to decorate my house with everything in here."

12. "Oh, look, something I didn't need but buying anyway."

13. "Could I pull this off? It's cheap and looks good on the mannequin..."

14. "Yeah, I could use another phone case."

15. "Yes, I found what I wanted. No, I did not need any of this."

Cover Image Credit:

eleventhgorgeous / YouTube

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I Tried On Clothes ~Without~ A Bra And It Unhooked My Self-Confidence

I didn't need a lift to look stunning.

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When I walked into the Kohl's dressing room, I was already wearing a dress with a low back and mid-drift cutouts. I chose my clothing options to try on in the store without any other thought than "this looks kinda cute," and I had already walked into a dressing room, closed the stall door before I remembered this crucial detail: I was not wearing a bra.

As a teenager growing up in the early 2000s, appearances were everything. Everyone was trying to have abs like Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera, and vying for clothes from Hollister and Abercrombie and Fitch. And yes, I did own some clothes from these stores, a few signature pieces to wear with the majority of my wardrobe from Kohl's or Walmart. But for my twelve-year-old self, a big insecurity was my chest.

As the horrible old saying goes, I was a part of the "itty bitty titty committee," and I was made painfully aware of it. In one awkward situation in junior high, I was sitting with a group of girls who were comparing the size of their chests to fruits. As they complimented each other on their "grapefruits," "melons," and "oranges", I sat there nervously dreading to hear what small fruit I'd be compared to. I remember looking down thinking "Probably a lemon or a lime" and bracing myself to be resigned to some small-fruited fate. When they finally got to me, they scoffed and quickly stated their decision, there was no deliberation: "a pea." A pea?!?! I felt so embarrassed and ashamed, something no girl should ever feel about their body.

Unfortunately, too many women feel self-conscious about some aspect of themselves and that plays out when trying on clothes. In a study published in the Journal of Consumer Psychology in 2014, larger sizes were found to elicit negative evaluations of clothing appearance, driven by the customer's appearance self-esteem. I could relate to this finding first hand. As I got older, I started to focus on my stomach and my thighs, and having to go up a clothing size filled me with anxiety. I felt like I no longer fit the mold of who I was before.

In that Kohl's dressing room, I initially thought "Crap, I can't try these clothes on now. I'll have to come back and go shopping another day." I thought that I wouldn't look good in those clothes without a bra and that I wouldn't be able to make an accurate decision about buying them if I wasn't wearing one. I was actually almost ready to jump ship when I realized how logically ridiculous I sounded to myself. I was already standing there half-naked in the dressing room and I figured what the heck, I'd just try them on anyway.

To my surprise, it was an uplifting and empowering experience.

Instead of focusing on my chest or my stomach, I just looked at the dresses themselves and my reaction to them. It was as if I threw away any preconceived notions of how these clothes were going to look and just took them at face value. Instead of dismissing pieces because they were unflattering, I enjoyed the patterns and natural shapes they had on me. It was wonderfully freeing and I actually ended up rejecting fewer pieces than I usually do. Now I could have just chosen a particularly good batch of clothes to try on, but what really astonished me was how improved my mood was. I was not dejected that I couldn't fit into a particular size, I was happy with the pieces I found and the way I felt when I was in them.

I realized that I shouldn't be focused on the letter or number printed on the price tag, but I should embrace on how I feel when I try clothing on, bra or no bra.

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c1.staticflickr.com

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