7 Careers That Require Minimal Experience and Offer Maximum ROI

7 Careers That Require Minimal Experience and Offer Maximum ROI

Not Just Nine to Fives
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Getting into the job market can be a nightmare. You may have earned a college degree, but a lot of employers still want years of experience before they even consider hiring you. It’s time to start thinking outside the entry-level box and looking into careers that offer a maximum return on your investment with a minimal amount of experience.

Here’s a list of some career options to get you started and hopefully set you on a path to financial solvency and personal fulfillment.

Bartending

Who doesn’t love the idea of socializing, slinging drinks and making money all at the same time? Bartending is the perfect way to do all that and more. There are two ways you can break into this career. One is to start as a barback, washing dishes and wiping down the bars, and the other is to complete bartending school, where they will teach you all the drinks you might ever need to make, and all the laws you need to know that pertain to tending bar.

Bartending school is usually inexpensive and doesn’t take long to complete — depending on how often you attend classes, you can finish the program in as little as two weeks.

Another perk of this career is you can take your skills anywhere. Want to tend bar at a ski lodge in the mountains? Take a trip and throw out some applications. Want to skip out on the cold weather and tend bar on a beach somewhere? It’s the same process with a different destination.

Garbage Collector

This might sound like a trashy job — ha-ha, pun intended — but it’s one where you can get in on the ground floor, make a decent amount of money and receive good benefits and sometimes even union support. Depending on the city where you live, you might not even need a degree — some waste-management positions don’t require anything more than an eighth-grade education to get you in the door.

All you need to be able to do is drive a truck and lift heavy objects — and possibly lose your sense of smell. You don’t need any experience at all, and there is plenty of room for advancement, you start at nearly $20 per hour.

Security Guard

Whether you’re patrolling the mall, handling cash deliveries and deposit pickups or even working for Homeland Security, being a security guard can be a great way to make decent money with no experience. Most security job positions don’t require anything more than a high school diploma for an unarmed guard position. Armed positions may require additional schooling and a firearms license, but many facilities are willing to pay for you to receive this training if they offer you a position.

Like many entry-level positions, you will be required to pass a pre-employment drug test and background check, and you can’t work as a security guard if you have a criminal record, but it’s a great entry-level career option — again, often with lots of opportunities for advancement.

Lineman/Cable Installer

We can’t live without our cable and Internet, so there’s a high demand for people to work as linemen and cable installers. These are excellent entry-level positions, because they require no experience, you don’t need anything more than a high school diploma and they offer on-the-job training to make sure you have all the skills you need. You don’t need to be an electrician to be a cable installer, and if you’re really good at it, there are training and management positions available as advancement opportunities.

Nursing

This career option does require additional schooling, but if you’re already in college, why not look at a nursing degree? Certified nursing assistants can make an average of $15 per hour, and registered nurses can make up to $30.

Nursing is an outstanding career if you like working with people, or enjoy helping people. The fact that it’s also a lucrative career is just a bonus.

Taxi Driver

No, we’re not talking about signing up with Uber or Lyft and ferrying people around in your vehicle — we’re talking about becoming an actual taxi driver. All you need to break into this career is driving experience — which most of us have been accumulating since we were 16 — a clean driving record and the ability to pass a background check.

A taxi driver in a busy city can make upwards of $70,000 a year, making it a pretty decent career if you love to drive. The hours can be rough — working weekends and holidays — but you can often set your own hours, which helps mitigate that a little bit.

Library Technician

While it takes years of schooling and a master’s degree to become an official librarian, you can become a library technician with as little as a high school diploma. You’ll work in a public library, assisting patrons and shelving books. Becoming a library tech is ideal for anyone who loves books, loves working with people or who might be in school working toward that degree to become a librarian.

Depending on the library, you will probably need computer skills as well, but for most of us, that’s not a problem — we’ve been on computers since before we could walk, so for us, it’s as easy as breathing.

Did we miss your favorite no-experience-required entry-level position? Let us know — we are always looking for new ideas to help college students and everyone else break into or get back into the working world without having to have years of experience under your belt.

Cover Image Credit: Matan Segev

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It's Time To Thank Your First Roommate

Not the horror story kind of roommate, but the one that was truly awesome.
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Nostalgic feelings have recently caused me to reflect back on my freshman year of college. No other year of my life has been filled with more ups and downs, and highs and lows, than freshman year. Throughout all of the madness, one factor remained constant: my roommate. It is time to thank her for everything. These are only a few of the many reasons to do so, and this goes for roommates everywhere.

You have been through all the college "firsts" together.

If you think about it, your roommate was there through all of your first college experiences. The first day of orientation, wishing you luck on the first days of classes, the first night out, etc. That is something that can never be changed. You will always look back and think, "I remember my first day of college with ____."

You were even each other's first real college friend.

You were even each other's first real college friend.

Months before move-in day, you were already planning out what freshman year would be like. Whether you previously knew each other, met on Facebook, or arranged to meet in person before making any decisions, you made your first real college friend during that process.

SEE ALSO: 18 Signs You're A Little Too Comfortable With Your Best Friends

The transition from high school to college is not easy, but somehow you made it out on the other side.

It is no secret that transitioning from high school to college is difficult. No matter how excited you were to get away from home, reality hit at some point. Although some people are better at adjusting than others, at the times when you were not, your roommate was there to listen. You helped each other out, and made it through together.

Late night talks were never more real.

Remember the first week when we stayed up talking until 2:00 a.m. every night? Late night talks will never be more real than they were freshman year. There was so much to plan for, figure out, and hope for. Your roommate talked, listened, laughed, and cried right there with you until one of you stopped responding because sleep took over.

You saw each other at your absolute lowest.

It was difficult being away from home. It hurt watching relationships end and losing touch with your hometown friends. It was stressful trying to get in the swing of college level classes. Despite all of the above, your roommate saw, listened, and strengthened you.

...but you also saw each other during your highest highs.

After seeing each other during the lows, seeing each other during the highs was such a great feeling. Getting involved on campus, making new friends, and succeeding in classes are only a few of the many ways you have watched each other grow.

There was so much time to bond before the stresses of college would later take over.

Freshman year was not "easy," but looking back on it, it was more manageable than you thought at the time. College only gets busier the more the years go on, which means less free time. Freshman year you went to lunch, dinner, the gym, class, events, and everything else possible together. You had the chance to be each other's go-to before it got tough.

No matter what, you always bounced back to being inseparable.

Phases of not talking or seeing each other because of business and stress would come and go. Even though you physically grew apart, you did not grow apart as friends. When one of you was in a funk, as soon as it was over, you bounced right back. You and your freshman roommate were inseparable.

The "remember that one time, freshman year..." stories never end.

Looking back on freshman year together is one of my favorite times. There are so many stories you have made, which at the time seemed so small, that bring the biggest laughs today. You will always have those stories to share together.

SEE ALSO: 15 Things You Say To Your Roommates Before Going Out

The unspoken rule that no matter how far apart you grow, you are always there for each other.

It is sad to look back and realize everything that has changed since your freshman year days. You started college with a clean slate, and all you really had was each other. Even though you went separate ways, there is an unspoken rule that you are still always there for each other.

Your old dorm room is now filled with two freshmen trying to make it through their first year. They will never know all the memories that you made in that room, and how it used to be your home. You can only hope that they will have the relationship you had together to reflect on in the years to come.


Cover Image Credit: Katie Ward

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There Is No 'Right Way' To React To A Shooting

Everyone is different.

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After the shootings this year in New Zealand, Brazil, and close to home for some of us Aurora, people have been reacting in different ways. With some offering their thoughts and prayers, donating money to help pay for the funerals of the victims, fighting for action in regards to ending gun violence, candlelight vigils basically anything that can help them in this time of grief.

There is no right or wrong way to react to a shooting — everyone grieves in their own ways. We should not judge one another for how we grieve in a tragedy.

People have been saying that thoughts and prayers won't do anything. However, maybe it can be a comfort to some people—a way to let people know that they are thinking of them and that they care.

Sometimes people may want to donate money or blood to help out any survivors who may have suffered from blood loss or create GoFundMe accounts to either help out with medical expenses or to pay for the funerals of the victims or even start charities like Islamic Relief USA. Donating your time and money is a good way to help out because you are making a difference that is a form of action you are taking.

There is also grieving in the form of vigils. One example of a vigil is this guy who makes crosses every time there is some kind of tragedy. Vigils are often a good way to remember the victims, to pray for the healing of the survivors, to talk about what they were like as people.

Some people even want to take action by demanding that the laws change a good example of this would be March for Our Lives, which happened after the Parkland shooting last year. This march was fighting for gun control or should I say changes in the gun laws America currently has.

Some people also do acts of solidarity, for example, wearing a hijab like the prime minister of New Zealand did when she went to go visit the Christchurch shooting survivors. My community college had something a couple of years ago called Hijab Day to help show solidarity with our friends. I participated, and it was quite an experience—no one should ever be afraid to be who they are.

There is never a right or wrong way to react, and no one should ever criticize one another for how they react. It's not a test where there is a right or wrong answer—everyone is different and that is okay.

No one should ever have to be afraid to go to school, go to work, or go to their place of worship or wherever they decide to go. Whatever we decide to do to make a change, as long as we are taking some kind of action, is good enough for me.

Nothing ever gets done by sitting around and doing nothing, so whatever it is you do, get out there and do it. As long as you are showing support it doesn't matter how you show it.

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