5 Things You Should Always Try To Make Time For, No Matter How Busy You Get

5 Things You Should Always Try To Make Time For, No Matter How Busy You Get

We tend to push these things to the bottom of the priority list.

Growing up sure did happen fast. Remember the days when you could come home from school and spend the rest of the afternoon playing games and watching TV with your friends, until it was time for their parents to pick them up?

When you could roll out of bed at whatever hour you pleased on weekend mornings instead of waking up at the crack of dawn to make it to your morning shift at work on time? Back when you didn’t even need to write down your assignment due dates because you were reminded of them every day—and there were no monthly payments, meetings, interviews, work events or office hours to clutter your mind. Back when life was simpler.

Now, most young adults feel as if they don’t even have time to breathe. Worse yet, with so much on our minds, and the stress of all these tasks and responsibilities ruling us, we tend to push the things that can improve our well-being and help relieve that stress to the bottom of the priority list.

Here are reminders of a few of the things you should make an effort to prioritize in the midst of your chaotic schedule:

1. Reading for pleasure

So many friends of mine—friends who used to be total bookworms in high school, who hailed Barnes & Noble as a sacred palace—have complained that they just don’t have time anymore to indulge in a good book, and how sad it makes them. Reading is a great hobby and books have the power to carry us out of our real-life issues and stresses if only for a little while. If it’s something you love to do, you should try to set a little time aside for it each week.

2. Talking to a counselor

If you find yourself really struggling with everything that’s on your plate and you feel your mental and emotional state deteriorating because of it, take the time to get the help you need. Talking to a counselor about what you’re going through can really help to take some of the burden off, and you’ll be able to approach all the things you need to do with a clearer head if you set up regular appointments.

3. Quality time with friends

Sometimes the only therapy you need is spending time with the people who know everything about you and love you anyway, the ones who just get you. You can laugh with them for hours, and even when you’re not doing much of anything, you can still make great memories. Not to mention, chances are many of your friends are going through the same hecticness as you, and you know you can count on each other to help navigate it.

4. Making sure you are physically healthy

College students are notorious for hoping their medical concerns are not serious issues and will take care of themselves. But if you really feel like something might be wrong with your health, you should always try to go and get it checked out by a doctor as soon as possible.

5. Walking

Going for a walk improves every aspect of your health. It gives you a chance to clear your mind, and to really slow down for a while and take in the world around you—the sounds, the fresh air, the stillness. Just doing one lap around your campus once a day can work wonders. Not to mention, you will lose weight if you stick to it.

Cover Image Credit: Ariana Leo

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Success Is Great, But Failure Is Better

Fail and fail often.

Don’t let success get to your head, but don’t let failure get to your heart. Know that things don’t always work out as planned, and that is OK!

For many millennials, it’s easiest to just give up when something doesn’t go your way. But take heart. Success is great, but failure is better. The reality is, you’re going to fail... a lot.

Failure does not mean your idea was not good or that your dream isn’t valid.

Failure means you have more to learn.

Failure is GOOD.

It shows you that you did something wrong and that you need to take a redirection. It’s an opportunity to come back stronger with a better attack plan. It’s a second chance.

Having failed many times in my life, there’s one thing for sure: failing sucks. It sucks being disappointed. It sucks not succeeding on the first try. However, you can learn to become a good failure.

Failing is inevitable, which is why it is important to learn from our mistakes. You’ll learn more from a single failure than a lifetime of success. Here’s what you can do when you mess up: accept what you can’t change, keep an open mind, maintain a positive attitude, and know that nothing will be perfect.

When I was a sophomore in high school, I was on an engineering team at my school. I was extremely confident in our abilities as a team, so when we didn’t advance to the world finals, I was devastated. The next year, however, my team placed second at the national competition, and we advanced to the world finals. If I had allowed that initial failure to consume me, I wouldn’t have been successful the next year.

It was not easy to advance to the world finals, but because I took my previous failure as a learning opportunity, my team succeeded. I knew I couldn’t change the past, so I didn’t focus on it. I kept an open mind about the competition and did not allow my bitterness to harden me, thus maintaining a positive attitude. My team wasn’t perfect, and I knew that. But I knew if we worked hard, we would succeed. We did.

Every failure is feedback on how to improve. Nothing works unless you do, and nothing works exactly the way you want it to. Failure is life’s greatest teacher; it’s nothing to be scared of. If we are so focused on not failing, we will never succeed.

So fail, and fail often.

Cover Image Credit: Pixabay

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7 Things English Majors Go Through

Yes, I'm an English major. No, I'm not throwing away my education.

I love being an English major.

And no -- I'm not lying.

While I do advocate for womxn in tech and the rise of STEM majors, my heart belongs to the humanities and more importantly: English Literature.

Here are some of the things as an English Major that I have experienced:

1. So... Do you wanna be a teacher?

As an English Major, my sole purpose of getting my degree is not to just become a teacher. I also want to be a writer. Get it right. I also want to be a teacher, though, so...

2. Writer's Block

Writer's block = hell unleashed. My brain is my most valued. My heart, too, but my brain is what helps me actually write my essays and poems. When my brain isn't working, I'm not working, and with those two not working -- I'm not getting anything done.

3. Having Friends Ask You To Edit Their Papers

My mood 24/7 when people ask me to edit their papers. I'm working on my own, leave me alone. Seriously though, I know I'm an English major, but there's a reason why office hours were created -- but if you REALLY need my editing/revising, pay up.

4. Reading "Whatever" Literature

There are some great works that I love reading (Frankenstein, Great Expectations, Dr. J & Mr. H, etc). But if I'm forced to read another book that EVERYONE has "read" and ends with the classic patriarchal ending -- I'd rather not. Give me some more Mary Shelley, please.

5. Reading AMAZING Literature

OK BUT WHEN THE CLASS READS SOMETHING LIKE MRS. DALLOWAY -- I AM SO HAPPY (I love you, V.W). But, honestly, I love most literature (especially classics). It's only with very few works that I'm upset with reading. (50 Shades of Grey? Blegh.)

6. Getting Trash-Talked About Your Major

OkAy, SuSaN, I get that you're happy with being in the business school, but frankly I don't care, so don't worry about me or my major. We, English majors, get trash-talked about our majors. Back in the day, our major was considered noble and great -- and now it's considered as "throwing away our education".

7. Knowing that We Chose the Right Major

In my experience in college so far, I've met very few -- actually no one who has changed their major from English Lit/CRTWRT. (Disclaimer: I'm sure there are some?) But those of us who stayed with this major know that we chose the right path for ourselves. While our friends in STEM, Business, etc. are "having fun" with their path, we get to read our favorite works, write, and appreciate the arts. So... who's the real winner? ;)

Cover Image Credit: Study Breaks

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