5 Questions You Can Really Only Ask Your Best Friend

5 Questions You Can Really Only Ask Your Best Friend

If you aren't comfortable with girl talk, you may want to stay far far away from the best friends who ask before they think

Best friends are ruthless. They have inside jokes that absolutely no one could comprehend, even if it was explained to them, they go everywhere together, and are not afraid to be open to one another. If you aren't comfortable with girl talk, you may want to stay far far away from the best friends who ask before they think.

1. "Can we just Netflix romance movies and eat an entire tub of ice cream?"

This questions seems to always come up when either me or my bestie are going through a heartache, menstruation, or if we just don't feel like going out. We don't judge each other for going down on some cookies n cream while we watch steamy Zac Efron on the flatscreen, because we are best friends, and any kind of time spent with the other is time well spent.

2. "Wanna grab Chick-fil-A?"

Okay, so we may have a slight obsession with salty waffle fries dipped in Chick-fil-A sauce, but who isn't? I don't think I could remember a single time where neither of us wanted to go to the drive thru (especially on Sundays...), because we are always down to go! There is nothing like belting out High School Musical while waiting in line, sitting right next to your bff.

3. "Do these pants make my butt look flat?"

Your best friend should not only hype you up when you look hot, but should also be brutally honest. If your bestie isn't telling you the truth, who will? Shopping is prime girl time, and you should never let her buy anything you don't think looks good on her! Praise her for all her glory, but also make sure she doesn't commit fashion mistakes.

4. "Does my first name sound weird with his last name?"

Boys, we talk about you. Oh, we talk about you everyday. Yep, we send each other screenshots of Instagram pictures, text messages, and even trace your family on Facebook. We have late night talks about potential marriage and babies, and make sure that, before things get too serious, all of the boxes are checked. So just know that her best friend knows everything about you before you even meet her.

5. "Why do I miss you so much?"

At the moment, my best friend and I are 140 miles away from each other. She attends a school near our hometown, and I moved two and a half hours away. FaceTime is something we can barely manage with our crazy schedules, but when we do, we cherish every moment of it. Not a day goes by without me texting, calling, or sending her a Snapchat. Going from spending everyday together, to only being able to communicate some of the time has been difficult, and making new friends and experiencing new things without her is even harder. This doesn't change us, though, because we will always be there for one another. Abbey, if you're reading this, I miss you. I can't wait to see you when both of us are able to go home and tell each other every little thing that college has brought us so far! Blaze on.

Cover Image Credit: Kelsi Mills

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Options For Care Of Aging Family Members

It can be a difficult conversation to start, but once you get them to open up, they can be very clear with their wishes

Helping loved ones face the struggles of old age is a very difficult situation. First and foremost, you always want them to be safe and healthy, but you also want to let them stay in the familiar surroundings of the home they may have occupied for decades. It is an issue that involves both emotions and finances, making it twice as hard to deal with.

The best time to discuss this situation with aging parents or other loved ones is long before it’s necessary. It can be a difficult conversation to start, but once you get them to open up, they can be very clear with their wishes. From there, you must work together to formulate a plan to provide for their care as they need more assistance.

There are three general ways they can choose to receive care. The first would be to let them stay in their own home and provide care there. The second would be to move in with you or with other family members, and the third would be to make the transition into an assisted-living facility.

Each of those options has its relative advantages and disadvantages. You’ll need to weigh them with your family member before making a decision.

Staying At Home

This is often the most affordable option, even when 24-hour assistance is required. Should that be the case, most families will find the cost considerably lower to provide support staff than to move to a nursing home. It can be cheaper still if family members can set up a schedule to stay with the seniors, even if it’s just part of the time.

The home may require some modifications, which can be done by a construction pro. If mobility has declined, it may be simply a matter of building a few ramps, adding some handrails, and getting stair chair lifts installed.

With the support of a home health agency and volunteers, you can put off the move to a nursing home facility.

Staying With Family

This is the second-best choice for many families. If the senior can’t stay in their own home and meet his or her own ADLs or activities for daily living, another option is to stay with loved ones. This represents an acceptable compromise when staying in their own home isn’t possible.

However, this type of move still represents a big adjustment. The senior may have to move a great distance, creating concerns about moving and storing their belongings as well as about what to do with the house. If selling it is not an option, there will be some expense and effort involved in securing and maintaining it.

Otherwise, this can be a very positive option. The home may require some of the same modifications we noted earlier, but beyond that, the transition can be fairly smooth.

Assisted Living Or Skilled Nursing

This final option is best for seniors who require either some or full skilled health care around the clock. This could be as simple as assistance with bathing and eating, and additional physical therapy. A skilled nursing facility is a good option for patients who may be recovering from strokes or more serious injuries such as hip fractures. In some cases, it can also be a good long-term solution.

It is a step that takes some preparation. There are insurance and estate considerations to review, and the change in location can be traumatic for the senior. The family will also need to make plans about the patient’s home and belongings, especially since such facilities have limited space.

Making plans for the care of an aging family member can be a difficult and confusing process. It’s important to discuss options with these loved ones and get a DPOA in place before decisions must be made.


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How To Make Friends In College

The 8 easiest steps to guide your own experience

Like many prospective college students, the single most intimidating fear I had before beginning my freshman year was not being able to make any friends. While making new friends may seem like a taxing chore, especially to someone like me who is shy and a little apprehensive, it is not impossible (and actually from from it). Within the first few hours on campus after arriving for move-in day, I quickly realized my fears were irrational and that making friends was going to be one of the easiest aspects of college. While making friends is an easy process that tends to come naturally to people, here are some ways that you can better immerse yourself into the social realm in college:

1. Do not be afraid to smile.

A small gesture like a simple smile goes a very long way. Whether you are walking down the hall in your dorm, across campus to class, or waiting in line at the dining hall, smile. Other people feed off of your body language and overall vibes, and by smiling people will feel more welcomed by your presence. People who feel more comfortable around you are more likely to approach you and start conversation.

2. Be friendly with your neighbors.

Your neighbors are likely to be some of the first people you meet when you arrive to your dorm. Living in a coed dorm, I have two guy neighbors and two girl neighbors, both of which have become close friends with my roommate and I over the past few months. While you do not have to be best friends with all of your neighbors, it is good to have people you can rely on to be there for you throughout the year.

3. Join clubs around campus.

Joining clubs or activities around campus is guaranteed to help you find your place and friend group on campus. Many colleges have hundreds of clubs that meet every need and like of each student. If you join a club that you have a passion for, you are bound to find other members of that club who share the same interests and goals as yourself. These are great friends to have because you can attend club meetings and events with a buddy!

4. Join intramural/club teams.

The most common misconception about joining a sports team in college is that you actually have to be adequate in the sport. Intramural and club sports teams are more focused on having fun and making memories than the competition. So pick a sport that you love, start or join a team, and go have fun with a bunch of people who have the same level of experience as you.

5. Talk in class.

While talking during class is normally discouraged, professors often encourage it so that their students have the chance to get to know one another. If you exchange numbers with the people next to you in the class on the first day, that's a couple more people than you knew when you walked in. Having a buddy in class is also helpful because you can work on homework together, study together, and text them with any class related questions you may have.

6. Participate in campus-wide events.

Whether you attend a thon to raise money or a sporting game, going to campus-wide event is bound to help you meet people. These events give you the opportunity to meet people outside of your year, dorm hall, and classes. The people who sit and cheer with you in the student's section and the people who help keep you standing at an all-day dance fundraiser just might shockingly be friends you will keep for life.

7. Do not give up.

It may at times feel discouraging if you have a lot of friends, but none that you are particularly close with. However, with time you will find your niche. There are so many people who are just like you and who compliment your personality on campus. It may take some time to find them, but once you do you will have them for life.

8. Be yourself.

Remember to always be true to yourself, and to never attempt to be someone who you aren't. You will not make friends this way and will not be happy if you do. You want to surround yourself with people who respect your true self and love that is for what it is. Embrace who you are, and find friends who cherish your quirks just as much as you do. This will not only provide great happiness but friendships that will last a lifetime.

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