18 Signs You're A Strong, Independent Woman

18 Signs You're A Strong, Independent Woman

"Here's to strong women, may we KNOW them, may we BE them, may we RAISE them." - Unknown
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Strong women are a gift to the universe. They help us live, learn, and grow. They shape who we are even if we don't know them personally. Without them, we literally would not exist. Here's to all the strong women out there - may we raise more girls to be brave, fearless, and proud like you.

1. You believe in yourself and others.

Though it may not always be inherently obvious, you know that you and your friends are capable of anything. You're willing to encourage everyone and anyone who needs an extra push and when it comes to self-motivation, you're willing to give it your best shot.

2. If the path is unclear, you're willing to find another way.

Sometimes the rules aren't clear, or they don't make sense for everyone following them. You're willing to think outside the box and find an alternative solution that will benefit everyone.

3. You're more of a leader than a follower.

If you're willing to find a way around the rules, you're likely more of a leader than a follower. The world was built on strong, independent women, and we have no shame!

4. It's more comfortable for you to do things your own way.

It's not that you have a superiority complex or anything, but sometimes it's more comforting to complete things the most efficient way possible (in your honest opinion).

5. You're a role model to someone.

Even if it's a neighbor, co-worker, a niece, or nephew, you matter to someone. Someone probably thinks you're really cool even when you think you're not looking so hot. Remember that you are always going to be #goals for someone.

6. You're an emotional rock.

People come to you for help, whether it be emotional or physical. You offer a shoulder and stay strong for people who need you. It's one of the traits that makes you so strong.

7. People rely on you.

Whether it be for money, work, friendship, or something else altogether; people rely on you. You're dependable, and people know you won't let them down. You're an important person to know.

8. You're passionate about whatever you do.

You put 100% dedication into everything you do, and people really value that. You know that the job isn't done until you've seen it through to the end. You're not afraid to do whatever you can to get to the finish line.

9. Honesty is something you value.

There is no strength in lying, in faking it, or in two-faced relationships. You know that honesty is important in every single endeavor. You set an honest precedent for everyone around you.

10. You ask for help when you need it.

Part of being strong is knowing how to ask for help. Being strong doesn't mean carrying the weight of the world on your shoulders alone; it means knowing how to delegate and ask for help when you require it. A strong woman did not become strong without the help of other strong women.

11. You get shit done one way or another.

Even when you procrastinate something, you're multitasking and getting work done. Even when you're taking a break, you're actively thinking about something else you have to work on. Finishing things isn't a problem for you, no matter how much time you may need to finish them.

12. Even when you feel like you can't pull yourself together, you do.

You know that tomorrow is a new day and everything will work itself out in the end. Even when it doesn't work itself out, you figure something out and find a different way. You're a perseverance expert when it comes to getting yourself together.

13. You test the limits.

Part of being a strong woman is breaking the bounds, changing the game, and making history. Whether it's arguing for a pay raise, fight for equality, or something more personal, like escaping your comfort zone - there is no test to see how far you'll go.

14. You empower other women, instead of putting them down.

You know that no strong woman became strong on her own. You empower and encourage other women instead of tearing them down. You stand with your fellow #strongwomen, and push them toward greatness.

15. No one needs to tell you how to live your life.

You are strong and independent! You don't need anyone giving you directions or orders. You know this and refuse to accept those who attempt to order you around.

16. Sometimes you put others before yourself, but you still take care of yourself properly.

Part of being a strong person is knowing that there are others you either have to or want to take care of. Despite this, you still know how to engage in self-care. Without it, you know you won't be strong enough to care for the others.

17. Even when you don't feel strong, you hang in there for the people who need you.

Even on your worst days, you keep going. You're not only someone who refuses to throw in the towel until everyone is safe and okay, but you're also someone who makes sure everyone is comfortable and content before truly reeling it in for the day.

18. You know you're a strong, independent woman who doesn't need anyone to tell her otherwise.

Sometimes it's not always obvious, but you know damn well that no one can undermine you. You know when you're right and you know when you're wrong even if you're reluctant to admit it sometimes. You know when people are underestimating and undervaluing you. Know yourself, know your worth.

Cover Image Credit: Jill Wellington / Pixabay

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9 Queer Pride Flags That You Probably Didn't Know About

The rainbow flag is certainly the most recognizable, but it isn't the only Pride Flag there is.
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It's Pride Month yet again and fellow members of the LGBTQ+ community and their allies are celebrating. Normally around this time of year, we expect to see that all-too-familiar rainbow colored flag waving through the air, hanging from windows and sported on clothing of all types. Even when not strictly a flag, the colors of the rainbow are often displayed when showing support of the larger queer community. But what many people do not realize is that there are many, many pride flags for orientations of all kinds, so Natasha and I (Alana Stern) have created this handy guide to some others that you may not yet be familiar with:

1. L is for Lesbian and G is for Gay

The most recognizable letters of the entire acronym, L (Lesbian) and G (Gay), represent the homosexual people of the LGBTQ+ community. Homosexuality is defined as being exclusively sexually attracted to members of the same sex. Again, although the rainbow Pride flag is easily the most iconic and recognizable, there is a Lesbian Pride Flag as well. Specifically for "Lipstick Lesbians," this flag was made to represent homosexual women who have a more feminine gender expression. Here are the Lesbian Pride Flag (left) and Gay Pride Flag with the meaning of each stripe (right).



2. B is for Bisexual

Bisexuality is defined as the romantic and/or sexual attraction towards both males and females. They often go unacknowledged by people who believe that they cannot possibly feel an attraction for both sexes and have been called greedy or shamed in many ways for being who they are, but not this month. This month we recognize everyone and their right to love. Here is the flag and symbol that represents the big B!


3. T is for Transgender (Umbrella)

Gender identities are just as diverse as sexual orientations. Transgender people are people whose gender does not necessarily fall in line with their biological sex. That is to say, someone who is born male may not feel that calling oneself a man is the best way to describe who they are as a person; the same can go for someone who is born female or intersex (we'll get to that in a bit). Someone born female may feel that they prefer to be referred to as a man. Someone born male may feel that they don't mind being referred to as either a man or a woman. And someone may feel that neither term really fits. Identities can range from having no gender, to multiple genders, to having a gender that falls outside of the typical gender binary of man/woman, to anything in between. The colors of the flag are blue (the traditional color for boys), pink (the traditional color for girls) and white (to represent those who are intersex, transitioning, or have a gender that is undefined).


Okay! Here's where we get into the lesser-known letters of the acronym. You may have heard of some of these before but didn't quite know what they meant or how they fit into the larger queer community, or you may not have heard of them at all. Either way, we'll do our best to explain them!

4. I is for Intersex

Intersex people are people who are have a mix of characteristics (whether sexual, physical, strictly genetic or some combination thereof) that would classify them as both a male and a female. This can include but is not limited to having both XX and XY chromosomes, having neither, being born with genitalia that does not fit within the usual guidelines for determining sex and appearing as one sex on the outside but another internally. It is possible for intersex people to display the characteristics from birth, but many can go years without realizing it until examining themselves further later in life. Here is an older version of the intersex flag which utilizes purple, white, blue and pink (left) and a more recent one that puts an emphasis on more gender-neutral colors, purple and yellow (right).


5. A is for Aro-Ace Spectrum

The A in the acronym is usually only defined as Asexual, which is a term used to describe people who experience a lack of sexual attraction to any sex, gender, or otherwise. People who are asexual can still engage in healthy romantic relationships, they just don't always feel the need or have the desire to have sex and are not physically attracted to other people. If that's confusing, think of it this way: you are attracted women, but not men. You may see a man and think, "He's kind of cute" or "That's a pretty good-looking guy," but you still would not feel any desire towards that person, because that's not what you're into. Asexual people generally feel that way about everyone. That's the "Ace" half of "Aro-Ace."

"Aro," or Aromantic, is a term used to describe people who do not experience romantic attraction. Aromantic people still have healthy platonic relationships, but have no inclination towards romantic love. The reason Asexual and Aromantic are together is because they are very heavily entwined and oftentimes can overlap. Underneath that spectrum are also other variations of asexuality (including but not limited to people who still feel as though they are asexual but experience sexual attraction in very rare circumstances, or only after they have a romantic connection) and aromanticism (including but not limited to people who still feel as though they are aromantic but experience romantic attraction in very rare circumstances).

Below are two versions of the Aromantic Pride Flag (top and middle) and the Asexual Pride Flag (bottom).





6. P and O are for Panseuxal and Omnisexual

Pansexual and omnisexual people are not limited by gender preferences. They are capable of loving someone for who they are and being sexually attracted to people despite what gender their partner identifies as. The word pansexual comes from the Greek prefix "pan-", meaning all. Pansexuals or Omnisexuals will probably settle for whoever wins their heart regardless of that persons gender.


7. But what about the Q?!

The Q can be said to stand for Queer or Questioning, or both. "Queer" is more of a blanket term for people who belong to the LGBTQ+ community or who identify as something other than heterosexual or cisgender (a term that has come to describe people who feel that their gender does fall in line with their biological sex; i.e. someone born male feels that he is a man). It is also possible for someone to identify as queer, but avoid using it to refer to specific people unless you know they are okay with it; some people still consider it insulting. Questioning means exactly what it sounds like: it gives a nod to those who are unsure about their sexuality and/or gender identity or who are currently in the process of exploring it.

There's no one flag specifically for the letter Q, as all of the above sexualities and identities technically fall underneath this term.


This list is hardly comprehensive and there are a number of other flags, orientations and identities to explore. Pride Month is still going strong, and there's always more to learn about the ever-changing nature of sexuality as a whole and the way we understand it. It's a time for celebration, but also a time to educate and spread the word.

For a more in-depth description of different types of attraction and how they work, click here.

For more complete lists of gender identities throughout history, click here or here.

For a general list of commonly used words in the LGBTQ+ community and their definitions, click here.


Now go grab a flag and fly it high--you've got a ton to choose from!

Cover Image Credit: 6rang

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Exclusive Premiere: LGBTQ+ Artist, Linnel, Releases Stunning Visual With A Strong Message For The Community

Pride month just got that much better

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Made to feel ashamed of who he was, Linnel has only recently been able to accept and explore his queer identity. "I'm Sick" is the culmination of self expression that had been suppressed for 18 years. The song came out a few short months ago and today the world finally gets a chance to see the video that changes the narrative of the song entirely.


What at first sounds like a love song, is really an anthem for the LGBTQ+ community. The video, directed by Madi Boll, is centered around a boy named Leyton, played by Pierson Carlson, who is interested in wearing makeup. But when his mom and sister walk in on him putting lipstick on he is made to feel ashamed and a "disease" begins to take form on his skin, alluding to how being gay used to be listed in the DSM. While the gay community has made many improvements in equality, the trans community is now experiencing similar discrimination.

Feeling insecure about his identity, Leyton goes on a walk to clear his head, but finds himself at a party where Linnel is singing "I'm Sick" and everyone there is confidently displaying signs of the same disease. It is a place of community and togetherness, where everyone is welcome. By the end of the party, Leyton's "disease" has fully taken form, but feeling confident in himself, he goes home ready to fully embrace just that. The hope for this video is that it serves as an opportunity for all intersections of the queer community to reclaim the idea that being queer, and/or any other part of the LGBTQ+ community, is a "sickness" or "disease."

Being queer himself, the message of this video is incredibly important to Linnel not only as an artist, but as a person. In the weeks leading up to the video Linnel hosted a "Question of the Week" series on Instagram that consisted of different topics within the LGBTQ+ community. Topics ranged from internalized homophobia to favorite queer art and the responses came pouring in. It enabled people to have a platform to speak out on certain issues/topics that aren't generally brought up in the mainstream media. The responses from all different people brought to light many similarities in regards to why people don't or wait to come out, what they love about their queerness, and how they feel about their own internalized homophobia. For more on this, check out Linnel's Instagram story highlights under "QOW".

Linnel is only just getting started. The "I'm Sick" music video has made a statement about the kind of behavior and morals that he stands for. Linnel hopes to continue to shine a positive light on the LGBTQ+ community, while making music that brings people of all mindsets together to start a conversation.

Cover Image Credit:

Linnel

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