10 Reasons Why Dads Are Pretty Cool Dudes

10 Reasons Why Dads Are Pretty Cool Dudes

We all love our dads no matter how many times they repeat the same corny joke
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Father's Day is today. Probably one of the best days of the year to celebrate the one's you love, besides Mother's Day and Christmas. Today is a celebration of the other half of the dynamic duo who raised us, or in some cases the only dynamic. Nonetheless, fathers are some of the coolest people around (hence why they get their own day). In honor of all the fathers, including my own, here are some reasons why dads are such cool dudes.

1. They give us cool trends

From the dad shirts to the dad hats, dads have such a distinct yet intriguing style that we all love. Certain outfits you've seen your dad wear you automatically classify as the "dad look." The classic baseball caps all dads seem to wear have made a comeback into recent fashion. I've come to love it so much I've taken one of my dad's hats to add to my collection (which is continuously climbing).

2. They let us try semi-dangerous stuff

I know that if it were my mom, she would not have let me try to use a lawnmower at age 7, but since it was with my dad it was totally acceptable. Father's are known to have "dangerous" fun, but not dangerous enough for you to actually get hurt. It's only enough danger to have your mom screaming her head off about not letting her baby get hurt or damaged in any way. Dads teach us how to use tools and nail stuff into wood, which is kind of dangerous, but fun.

3. The best babysitters

When dad babysits everything is fantastic. You get to jump off things--in my case the top bunk--and do other exciting things like play outside and run around. Basically get into any mischief with your siblings as long as you don't completely injure yourself. The awesome thing about dads is that they never really see anything wrong with anything really.

4. Bring out your competitive side

Dads teach their kids how to fight for the number one spot, even if that means getting your hands dirty. I mean what dad doesn't want their kid to be the best in sports, school, etc.

I don't think I would have such a love and appreciation for the English language if it wasn't for my dad. From third grade up until seventh grade, I competed in Spelling Bees. I did everything I needed to do to make my father proud for all the hard work we had done to get me into each competition. The competitive drive continued throughout these years and even got me on TV a few times. So thanks, dad.

5. Watching sports = bonding time

Watching sports is a time where your dad gets to tell you all these confusing terms on Saturdays and Sundays that you don't understand at first, but as the years go by it gets a little less confusing. (give it like 10 years...maybe 15)

Watching sports is a pastime for my siblings and my dad. Especially when it's basketball season, we all crowd around the TV while my dad gets to act like he's the coach for four quarters.

6. They're fortune tellers

I'm convinced dads can tell the future. Sometimes they may say things like "You'll change your mind. You probably won't want to do that." Give it a few days and they're right?! Kind of weird, but you have to love them for foreseeing the future.

7."Where's Mom?"

You can usually get your dad to say yes to just about anything, especially if you're the youngest sibling.So whenever your mom says no to something, you can usually get away with it by going to ask your dad.. unless they say "have you asked your mom yet. What did she say?"

8. The hate/love relationship with Dad Jokes

Any child can relate to this. The dad jokes. They make us cringe, but sometimes we laugh anyways because they're so ridiculous.

9. Never Let's You Win

Dads are naturally competitive. Sometimes they let you win in life and sometimes they don't. When you're younger, they go easy on you; they don't want to hurt your feelings. However, as you get older it just gets worse. They start getting really competitive and you start wondering where all the hidden talent was 10 years ago.

But, you really weren't surprised because you got the competitive nature from him anyways so it was expected at some point.

10. Dad will always be Dad

No matter what, even when you've gone to college, your Dad will still always be there to support you, love you, and always keep it 100.


Cover Image Credit: http://www.crosscards.com/cards/holidays/fathers-day/

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Acts 1:8 Ministry Explains How To Teach Your Child To Be Charitable And Compassionate

Acts 1:8 Ministry, a non-profit organization based out of Wisconsin, believes in building strong community foundations with integrity and humility.

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There have been many natural disasters that have wreaked havoc in the United States and around the world such as tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes, floods, tsunamis, and volcanic eruptions. Over the last few decades, the generosity of Americans has become well-known, and it's vital to inspire this charitable and compassionate concern for others down to future generations.

Acts 1:8 Ministry has helped enrich the lives of others around the globe through the support of generous donors and volunteers who want to help spread kindness, strengthen their faith, grow the Christian church, and improve communities. To pay it forward, Acts 1:8 Ministry explains below how parents can instill charitable and compassionate qualities in their children through word, action and leading by example.

Start At Home

If you have more than one child, you know there are those times they don't want to share toys, snacks, or even friends. Teaching siblings to share is less complicated when you teach your children why the love for each other is so important. In a family unit, each member depends on all the others. Parents provide shelter, food, clothing, and different needs. Children contribute by helping with chores, obeying house rules, and doing their homework. Mutual love and respect are what strengthens the family unit. Working and giving together teaches invaluable lessons to children and builds a secure family unit.

Working Together For Others

Donating time at a food pantry, shelter, or meal distribution center for low-income families or homeless folks in your local area teaches your children the importance of caring for those who are less fortunate. Explain why it is wrong to judge people who need free services to survive. Your children may encounter people who are dirty and wearing smelly clothes, and they need to know not to say anything that would hurt their feelings or embarrass them.

Giving Together For Others

If your state has a beverage deposit on soda, juice, and alcoholic beverages, you and your children can collect discarded cans and bottles. The money you receive from their redemption can be donated to a variety of charitable causes including animal shelters, food banks, clothing distribution centers, or a local charity you support. There is always a need for cash at all of these facilities. Plan annual family fundraisers, such as yard, craft, bake, and plant sales. Donate the money earned to one or more charitable projects the family chooses together.

Establish Charitable Habits

Establish habits and family routines to encourage charitable acts. Choose things that fit your family's lifestyle. Keep a large "charity" jar and place a dollar amount in it every time the family does something special such as going to the movies, spending a day at a water park, eating out, or taking a vacation. Whenever the family spends money on a fun adventure or outing, setting a little money aside to be used for those who don't have the same opportunities helps children understand the need for caring about other people. Other things you can do as a family include:

• Reduce the amount of clothing in your closets, and donate clean and undamaged items to a charity that distributes clothing to low-income families.

• Clean out the toys. Donate unbroken toys and games to homeless shelters that take in families or to a home for battered women and their children.

• Donate your time to visit a nursing home, and talk to different residents. Encourage your children to ask the older folks to tell stories about their childhood.

• Bake cookies or bread together and distribute to older people that live in your neighborhood. Have your children make a card to give with the food gift.

• Help a neighbor who has been sick with yard work, taking out the trash, or other chores he or she is not able to do.

Children love making others happy and will continue to feel the same way as adults if you help them establish the habits of caring, sympathy, helping, and compassion when they are young. By teaching children the core values of caring and compassion, future generations of Americans will continue to be the world's most generous and compassionate people.

About Acts 1:8 Ministry:

Acts 1:8 Ministry is a non-profit organization that equips Christians to care, share and connect people to Christ through Christian kindness. The Planned Acts of Christian Kindness® Program has touched thousands of lives in the US and over 100 countries worldwide. Through the Water Project, over 130 water wells drilled, blessing hundreds of thousands of lives with clean water.

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To The Dad Who Works Out Of Town, Thank You For All You Do

Thank you for everything you do, I wouldn't have the things I do if it wasn't for you.

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I want to say Thank you. Thank you for sleeping in hotel beds every night. Thank you for eating sandwiches some days for lunch while I ate my pizza Lunchables in my brand new Hello Kitty lunchbox.

Thank you for taking your truck with no cruise control some weeks for work because I wanted to drive your car. I'm sure driving for four hours straight with your foot on the pedal was pretty boring. Thank you for filling up the car before you let me drive it as well.

Thank you for waking up at 3 and 4 a.m. to head out of town to work and being so quiet while doing so. Thank you for adding lunch money to my account while you're over 100 miles away. Thank you for working sometimes 10-14 days straight without a day off. I can never thank you enough for what you do.

Thank you for filling my truck up in high school every Sunday night before you left for work. Thank you for spending your lunch breaks calling and making orthodontist appointments for me. Thank you for taking days off work to take me to some of these appointments. Thank you for always fitting me in.

While being out of town can make you feel like an absent parent, I promise you are not that. You always make sure to call me during the week. If I'm sick and didn't go to class, you call and check on me. You even call and remind me of things I need to get done like returning my rental book.

If it wasn't for you working out of town, I wouldn't have the luxuries I do now. I want you to know I am thankful for you.

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