10 Things Your Professor Says That Makes You Cry Right There In The Lecture Hall

10 Things Your Professor Says That Makes You Cry Right There In The Lecture Hall

Shoutout to all the professors who let you drop your lowest quiz grade.

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While we celebrate all the magic that December brings us, I can't help but remember what lies ahead. With only three semesters left, I feel as if I have college and professors down to a science. Syllabus week might seem like an extra week of break, but really it is where you can learn everything you need to know about the semester you have lying ahead of you. With that being said, there are certain things to listen for on syllabus week, and throughout the semester, that will let you know you have a rough road to ride.

1. “The final will be cumulative.”

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The key phrase that lets you know you are in for a semester of hell and a long finals week.

2. “Your grade will be an average of your 4 exams.”

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Nothing worse than knowing your big first flunk is going to affect your final grade more than it should.

3. “Attendance will count for 10% of your grade.”

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Better go out and get some coffee, because you are going to be waking up early every day for the next 3 months.

4. “There will be a group project.”

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Not only are you going to actually have to meet people in the class now, but you are also probably going to do the entire project yourself.

5. “Most people fail the first exam.”

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Dear professors, this is NOT the way we want to start our semester.

6. “This is not an easy class. You will need to spend time reading each week to prepar for each class.”

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Don't let the beginning of the year enthusiasm fool you. You will definitely not end up reading that textbook.

7. “The textbook is required and you will need the online code to submit homework.”

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I swear professors think we are made of money. Do they not remember what it was like to be in college?

8. “You need to put away all technology during lectures.”

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It is like a path back to grade school. Warm up your hands because you are going to be writing your notes this semester, and there is no way that you get it all right.

9. “Put away everything except a pencil. We are having a quiz.”

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You can't trust a professor who gives pop quizzes.

10. “There will be homework following each lecture.”

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Join a GroupMe or make a friend in the class because homework every night will make for a long semester if you are in it alone.

If you hear any of these ten things, prepare yourself for a tough semester. You can do it, but it won't be as easy as having a professor who doesn't take attendance!

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What Nobody Is Going To Tell You About Freshman Year

What no one will tell you about your first step to adulthood.
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Attending college for the first time is a time filled with high expectations, excitement, nerves, and a lot of hope for the future.

If you were anything like me, you were lucky enough to get accepted into your dream school with a lot of high hopes about the upcoming year. I couldn't wait to move into my freshman dorm, no matter how little or crappy it might have been, I was undoubtedly excited. The year was fresh (literally) and I couldn't wait to start living a college lifestyle and meet the people I was going to be friends with for the next four years of my life and hopefully even longer. I had never been so excited about going back-to-school shoppingand started packing and preparing for the move weeks in advance.

I had this image in my head of what freshman year was going to be like and it looked a lot like something you would see on an ABC Family or MTV show rather than what the reality of freshman year really was. I would be sitting here lying to you if I told you my freshman year was the best year of my life and to expect to have a year full of parties and fun with no responsibilities. The fact of the matter is, freshman year is your first real step into adulthood. It is your first unsheltered, uncensored, version of the real world that your parents (for the most part) have no control over. While this truly is an exciting thing, if you're not prepared for it freshman year can be a lot more stressful than expected.

I wish someone told me that the people I met the first week of school weren't going to be my best friends the whole year and not to take it to heart when they stop talking to you. You meet SO many people your first few weeks of school and you want to be friends with literally all of them. But in college, unlike high school, you probably won't see those same people every day so maintaining relationships takes a lot more work than before. To be honest, you may forget what it was like to actually make a new friend, especially if you were friends with the same people all through high school.

I wish someone told me that my study habits in high school absolutely will not hold up in college. When you were told to “read the text" in high school for homework, you wrote “no homework" in your planner for that day. Reading your text book in high school was actually laughed at in most situations and if you didn't have an end of the year freak out about where your text books were, you were doing it wrong.R ead your textbooks, every page, every chapter. Write everything down, from notes to homework, it's all important.

I wish someone told me the “freshman 15" was absolutely not a myth. Despite the fact that I spent countless nights in our campus gym, the freshman 15 was still gained and stayed. I couldn't tell you why or how this happens, but expect to gain a few pounds your first year of college. Whether it's from all of the campus cookies you couldn't have passed your final without or from all the delicious new food options, expect to be a few pounds heavier when returning home for Thanksgiving. And most importantly, know that you don't look any different despite how you feel, and know that this will most likely happen to everyone.

I wish someone told me that it's OK to say no to people. After you get to know your hall mates and become closer with the people you've met your first few weeks of college, you quickly learn that there is always something going on. Learn that you don't have to agree to attend everything someone invites you to. If you need to stay home and study, speak up. Don't just say yes to please someone or because you feel like you will lose that person as a friend if you say no. Learn to put you and your needs first, and if someone judges you because you decided to study rather than go out, so be it. You're here to learn not to socialize. It's OK to decline peoples offers.

I wish someone told me to go to class no matter how tired I was. Fun fact about college: you don't technically have to go to class if you don't want to. But for the sake of your grades, please go to class. You only get the chance to learn the material once, and you will be tested on the lecture material whether you were there or not. One tired day may cost you a good grade in the class, no joke. Go to every class you can and take detailed notes. (Tip: you can usually take pictures of the slides/diagrams as well, it helps a lot.)

I wish someone told me that only my true friends from high school will remain my friends in college. Losing contact with high school friends is a given in college. Even the people you swore were your closest friends may forget about you in the craziness of freshman year. The good news is you are at a school with thousands of people looking to make new friends and they will fill the empty spaces that old ones left.

I wish someone told me to be careful at parties. Although it is very rare something bad happens, it is true that parties aren't the safest place. Especially for the freshmen, it's easy to just go to the party that everyone else is going to without knowing anything about the place or who is going to be there. Look out for your friends and stay together. Navigating a college town at night is scary and can be dangerous. Know where you are going beforehand and always have a way home. Don't always trust people you have just met and never leave a cup unattended.

I wish someone told me my grades aren't going to be as great in college as they were in high school. Expect your GPA to drop at least half a point, usually. You're going to have a lot of distractions in college and a lot less structure in your schedule. Keeping a balance truly is a difficult task and your grades aren't going to always be what you want them to be. You will learn the perfect combination to keep your grades and yourself happy. Give it some time and don't beat yourself up if you get a C in a class or two. You have three years to make up for it.

I wish someone told me that getting homesick is completely normal. The first few spells of homesickness I had scared me to death. I was afraid that if I was homesick it meant that I didn't like the school I was at or that something was wrong or missing. This is usually not the case even though it may feel that way at times. You're going to miss home no matter how much you wished your way out of it from day one. Home is what is familiar to you and what you know and it's easy to crave that when you're somewhere completely different. Don't let it get the best of you and just know that a call home will fix anything and everything. Don't be afraid to call your parents and friends from home. They miss you, too.

I wish someone told me that you only get one freshman year at the college of your dreams so live it up and learn your lessons. Have the time of your life, make all of the friends you can, join clubs and organizations you're passionate about, get involved on your campus and in your community, and take nothing for granted. You only get to do college once (if all goes well) and you're paying to be here and get an education. Make the most of every situation and learn about yourself and the people around you. There is so much to be done and so much to learn in your four years here but especially the first. Make the most of it and don't forget your morals or who you are!

Cover Image Credit: Cailin Austin

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5 Lessons I've Learned in my First Year of College

It's been nearly 8 long months of growth and newfound understanding

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Moving away from home for the first time is almost as intimidating as it sounds, especially for a home-body like me. But there's so much excitement on move-in day, that the thrill of starting a new chapter in your life overthrows all of the negative nerves.

Here are 5 tips I have for all of the upcoming first year university students:

1. Schoolwork comes first

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Almost everyone enters freshmen year with the desire to party, make friends, and have fun... but classes tend to get in the way. As they should.

I wasn't into the whole party scene, but I've witnessed the negative affects that kind of lifestyle has had on my peers and their motivation to excel in their courses.

So don't neglect your classes, I repeat: Don't neglect your classes!

You may have the urge to skip class or procrastinate on homework, but if you stay on top of your schoolwork you'll be grateful by the end of the semester.

2. It may take time to make friends

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When I started college, I expected to make a ton of friends during my first month of classes. Friends I'd see everyday, friends I thought would be inseparable. But I was sadly mistaken.

It took a few months for me to make actual genuine friendships. At first I felt devastated and lonely, and I really questioned whether moving away for college was the right decision.

But all of my worrying was for nothing, because I went into my second semester with more friends than I would have ever imagined. They were definitely worth the wait, so if you ever feel the same just be patient.

3. Get involved

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Whether you're interested in joining a club, playing intramural sports, or attending an on campus ministry, just do it!

I think that on campus involvement is a must when it comes to having a fulfilling college experience. Becoming a part of a group with other like minded individuals is also great way to create friendships and life-long connections.

As important as schoolwork is, having people to study with or maybe just to blow off steam, can be extremely beneficial.

4. Don't be afraid of public speaking

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Public speaking will be a large part of your college experience, there's no cheating your way out of it. Whether you have to give a presentation in class or ask an important question, don't be afraid. No one is going to judge you, we're all in the same boat.

Everyone gets nervous, and no one has a love for public speaking... don't sweat it.

5. The gym is your friend

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Freshmen year can get super busy, but don't let that be an excuse to neglect your wellness. Make the effort to eat healthy food, and go to the gym.

Part of your tuition covers gym costs, so get you're moneys worth!

Keep up with your mental health, as well as your physical health, and get familiar with the resources available to you on your campus.

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