4 Reasons Why Men Should Not Be Making Laws About Women's Bodies

4 Reasons Why Men Should Not Be Making Laws About Women's Bodies

Why do men get to decide if women have a choice?

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Everyone is so quick to judge, especially Christians. Going forward, I'd like to make a point. As Tomi Lahren wrote in a Twitter post on May 16, 2019: "You're not God so don't you dare evaluate my faith based on your moral superiority complex." In more words, judging someone is a sin, and each sin is seen as the same in God's eyes. Romans 6:23 says "For the wages of sin is death..."

There is no specification as to which sin wages as the worst, so before you are so quick to judge, remember we are all seen as the same in God's eyes.

1. Men cannot become pregnant

"Men cannot become pregnant." They have no idea what it is like to be pregnant and to co-exist for an entire 9 months.

2. Men say things like... 

"Rape is kinda like the weather. If it's inevitable, relax and enjoy it." — Clayton Williams, R-TX.

"If it's a legitimate rape, the female body has ways to shut that thing down." — Todd Akin, R-MO.

"Rape victims should make the best of a bad situation." — Rick Santorum, former Republican candidate for president.

"If a woman has the right to abortion, why shouldn't a man be free to use his superior strength to force himself on a woman? At least the rapist's pursuit of sexual freedom doesn't (in most cases) result in anyone's death." — Lawrence Lockman, R-ME.

3. Men do not get their rights taken away by female politicians 

I'm sure there are things men go through that women couldn't imagine. But we don't judge them about whatever those things may be. Most women are advocates for men and their health. They acknowledge statistics about men, their mental health, and their physical health. We would never want to force men to get (what most of the media is buzzing about) a vasectomy until marriage. That isn't right, and no one would ever consider doing something that radical because ironically enough, it isn't right to tell someone else what to do with their body.

4. Men are men, politicians are politicians, and that doesn't mean they have the appropriate education to make decisions like this 

Some men are rather educated on women and their bodies. On the other hand, there are thousands of men, even men that are in the public eye all the time, that are not educated on women and women's health. They are politicians, they want to win, they want to manipulate, and they will use every single tool that they can to get to the top. Most of the men signing these bills into place have no credibility when it comes to women's health.

At the end of the day, this list could be so long that it would take hours to read. But, it shouldn't have to be. If a man isn't educated and credible enough, he shouldn't be making laws. Women's bodies aren't a playground to see who can go the furthest on the monkey bars. We must put a stop to this. We have to educate our youth. Most of all, we have to put these manipulative politicians in their place.

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11 Harsh Truths About Sorority Rush College Girls Should Find About Now, Not In September

For any young woman that is about to go through sorority rush, here's what to REALLY expect.

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There's a common theme of every sorority making it seem like rush is the best time in the world, and that Greek life is the best thing since sliced bread. While I'm not knocking the fact that some people probably really do enjoy rush, there are some harsh truths that I believe every young woman should know before heading into recruitment.

I gathered some quotes from different women from different sororities here at Jacksonville State to give you the most honest, unbiased, expectations and truths for going into recruitment.

1. Give it some time. 

"You're going to want a sorority that you're not going to get. 9 times out of 10 you won't go where you *think you belong. But-- where you end up is exactly where you're meant to be. My sorority was next to last on my list, but I decided that I was going to give it some time. Now, I've found my forever home. "

2. You have to be open-minded.

"Don't cater your personality to the sorority you think is best. You won't end up loving it because you won't connect with the girls. Be open-minded."

3. Be yourself. 

"My honest truth is that I thought I'd have to go in and put on a big smile and just be who they wanted me to be in order to get a bid. That's how I was in every single room except for the one that I got a bid from. I was only myself in the room I was sure I didn't want and because I showed my true colors, that's what made it my home."

4. Leave with no regrets. 

"Rush is about finding someplace that is your home and that you belong. I would advise girls not to be heartbroken if it turns out that a Panhellenic sorority is not their home here at Jacksonville State, because they can find their home in other organizations! Rush is also an opportunity to find friends. So, get out there and build relationships with the girls you meet because that's what I regret the most- not being open to new friendships and being too nervous."

5. They're just as nervous as you are. 

"Don't go into a room thinking that you're better than the women already standing in it. They've worked so hard all summer to perfect this week, for YOU. They are tired. They are nervous. They are excited. They might trip on their words. They might get uncomfortable if you act like you'd rather be dead than in their party. Even if you don't believe that sorority is your home, be nice. Your attitude in every room during rush will follow you."

6. Sisterhood makes it worth it.

"Recruitment is emotionally draining and you think it won't ever end, but it's so worth the sisterhood that comes from it."

7. Stay true to yourself. 

"Umm, I would say recruitment is probably going to be one of the most stressful times that a girl is going to go through coming into college! You will feel pressure from every aspect just trying to make sure you make the right decision and end up in the right one. While we are all fundamentally similar it breaks down to very different girls and you need to make sure you stay true to yourself so you will actually enjoy the sorority and girls that you end up around. If you can just make it through and not care what others have to say about where you wanna go ( because people will try to tell you where you should go) stay true to yourself and do what's best for you."

8. Trust the system.

"You don't always get the sorority you think you want, but it usually ends up being better for you in the long run. Trust the system."

9. Just breathe.

"With all honesty, my best advice is to be yourself. Recruitment can be very stressful and sometimes a little overwhelming, but just go based off your heart. Do not let your friends make the decision for you because their choice may not be your best fit. You can still be friends and be in different sororities. Now there is a possibility that you are torn between two sororities and that's okay. Just breathe and think about who you see yourself with more and figure out what YOU want."

10. Don't stress yourself out.

"While recruitment is very draining and stressful, take time for yourself to de-stress and relax after your parties. Get a good nights sleep, and think about your values and how you truly connect to the women you had met that day."

11. It's not for everyone.

"Greek life is wonderful, but it's not the only place to find belonging. If you go through rush and don't find your home, don't be discouraged. You're not going to lose any of your friends because they joined a sorority and you did not. There are tons of other opportunities to get involved and make friends in other organizations."

I'm not writing this to scare anyone away from Greek life. I'm writing this to give, the young women who are about to rush, real and honest expectations and opinions from women who've already been through the process. There are so many benefits to joining a sorority. Lifelong friends, job connections, campus opportunities, connecting with others who share your values.

Even though Greek life won't be a perfect fit for everyone, you can still get these same things I just listed by joining any other campus organization. It's all about finding where you really belong.

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Pride? Pride.

Who are we? Why are we proud?

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This past week, I was called a faggot by someone close to me and by note, of all ways. The shock rolled through my body like thunder across barren plains and I was stuck paralyzed in place, frozen, unlike the melting ice caps. My chest suddenly felt tight, my hearing became dim, and my mind went blank except for one all-encompassing and constant word. Finally, after having thawed, my rage bubbled forward like divine retribution and I stood poised and ready to curse the name of the offending person. My tongue lashed the air into a frenzy, and I was angry until I let myself break and weep twice. Later, I began to question not sexualities or words used to express (or disparage) them, but my own embodiment of them.

For members of the queer community, there are several unspoken and vital rules that come into play in many situations, mainly for you to not be assaulted or worse (and it's all too often worse). Make sure your movements are measured and fit within the realm of possible heterosexuality. Keep your music low and let no one hear who you listen to. Avoid every shred of anything stereotypically gay or feminine like the plague. Tell the truth without details when you can and tell half-truths with real details if you must. And above all, learn how to clear your search history. At twenty, I remember my days of teaching my puberty-stricken body the lessons I thought no one else was learning. Over time I learned the more subtle and more important lessons of what exactly gay culture is. Now a man with a head and social media accounts full of gay indicators, I find myself wondering both what it all means and more importantly, does it even matter?

To the question of whether it matters, the answer is naturally yes and no (and no, that's not my answer because I'm a Gemini). The month of June has the pleasure of being the time of year when the LGBT+ community embraces the hateful rhetoric and indulges in one of the deadly sins. Pride. Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, the figures at the head of the gay liberation movement, fought for something larger than themselves and as with the rest of the LGBT+ community, Pride is more than a parade of muscular white men dancing in their underwear. It's a time of reflection, of mourning, of celebration, of course, and most importantly, of hope. Pride is a time to look back at how far we've come and realize that there is still a far way to go.

This year marks fifty years since the Stonewall Riots and the gay liberation movement launched onto the world stage, thus making the learning and embracing of gay culture that much more important. The waves of queer people that come after the AIDS crisis has been given the task of rebuilding and redefining. The AIDS crisis was more than just that. It was Death itself stalking through the community with the help of Regan doing nothing. It was going out with friends and your circle shrinking faster than you can try or even care to replenish. Where do you go after the apocalypse? The LGBT+ community was a world shut off from access by a touch of death and now on the other side, we must weave in as much life as we can.

But we can't freeze and dwell of this forever. It matters because that's where we came from, but it doesn't matter because that's not where we are anymore. We're in a time of rebirth and spring. The LGBT+ community can forge a new identity where the AIDS crisis is not the defining feature, rather a defining feature to be immortalized, mourned, and moved on from.

And to the question of what does it all mean? Well, it means that I'm gay and that I've learned the central lesson that all queer people should learn in middle school. It's called Pride for a reason. We have to shoulder the weight of it all and still hold our head high and we should. Pride is the LGBT+ community turning lemons into lemon squares and limoncello. The lemon squares are funeral cakes meant to mourn and be a familiar reminder of what passed, but the limoncello is the extravagant and intoxicating celebration of what is to come. This year I choose to combine the two and get drunk off funeral cakes. Something tells me that those who came before would've wanted me to celebrate.

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