The Oppression Of Women In Islam Must End

The Oppression Of Women In Islam Must End

The story of a beautiful religion being disgustingly corrupted to favor oppressive men.
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Since the beginning of time, there has been an established role of men and women in society; men the hunters, the bringers of the bounty if you will, and women the gatherers and the caretakers. Because we live in a constantly evolving world, there has been a significant change in these roles.

Many women have expanded out of the domestic sphere to become the main provider of their families, and men have adapted and have become the main caregivers. However, this idea only applies to modernized and “western” nations; in Islamic societies, women tend to be forced into stereotypically feminine roles, uneducated, as well as oppressed.

This subjugation of women in Islamic society is ironic because the Prophet Muhammad, the founder of Islam, was a feminist. Muhammad laid out the word of God, which simply said that women were equal to men, women were to be educated just like men, women were able to both own and inherit property just like men. Muhammad built Islam on exactly this doctrine of equality but it seems that current Islamic societies have reverted back to their 7th century Arabia state where women were treated similarly to property. Today, many Islamic societies oppress women using the very religion that was once used to promote equality among all.

Specifically, in war-torn Islamic nations, women tend to lack even the most basic human rights. For example, in a court of law, a woman’s testimony is worth half that of a man’s. Furthermore, if a woman were to be murdered the compensation for the family would be half that for the murder of a man. In Islam, women are permitted only one spouse; however, men may have up to 4 wives. In addition, the legal age for girls to marry is just nine years old, but boys are allowed only after the age of fourteen. As a result, pedophiles are able to exploit and subsequently leave young girls. These are only a few of the injustices women and girls face.

Here in the US, people (especially teenagers) relish in the freedom that is choosing what to wear without heavy restrictions; in most Islamic societies women lack this freedom. Women are more often than not required to wear headscarves outside of the house or in the presence of males with the exception of family members and husbands.

Although many people argue that it is the religion of Islam that requires this practice, this idea is easily disproven because the religion only calls for modesty, which can be respected with conservative clothing. Not only are women encouraged, if not required, to wear a headscarf, but they often are forbidden from indulging in stereotypically feminine acts, such as applying makeup or nail polish. This comes back to the idea of “protecting” the modesty of women. Traditionalists believe that women are more likely to bring shame to their families or end up getting hurt, i.e. raped, if they were to revel in these practices.

All over the world, women have a higher chance of experiencing domestic abuse than men do, and in the Middle East that rate is even higher. In December 2016, 40% of Israeli and Arab women aged 16-48 reported that they had experienced some form of intimate partner violence (IPV). Whether it be rape, physical, or emotional abuse, women in the Middle East have a higher chance of experiencing it.

For some time, women were powerful and had rights, but centuries later societies dominated by Islam manipulated the religion to favor men and silence women. What heightens the urgency of the situation is that most women in Middle Eastern nations are unwilling to admit that they have been abused by their spouses because it will further belittle women in the eyes of men. They tend to be prodded with invasive questions: what were you wearing, what were you doing, were you alone, why were you alone. Consequently, the abuse continues and so does the silence.

Not only are women kept muzzled, but they are also kept uneducated. One of the few ways the corrupt Islamic society is able to grow is through uneducated women. Because the women are uneducated, they often do not understand how their legal system works, and as a result cannot get help from outsiders, thus staying oppressed.

If women were ever to learn the true teachings of Muhammad’s Islam it would be considerably harder to squash women and keep them in the domestic sphere. Women would understand their true value and protest for their rights and privileges, thus destroying the hierarchy traditionalists have built for centuries.

For hundreds and thousands of years, women have lived under the burden of injustice that is caused by corrupt interpretation of Islamic teachings. Women have been abused, raped, and oppressed for so long that it is the only life they know; it is the teachings they pass on to their daughters: listen to the men in your life and you will not be punished. In this society, to be a woman is to be punished. If you are born female, you are nothing but a burden to your family - an idea that is planted in the heads of young girls from the day they learn to think or talk.

Oppression is not only widespread in Islamic societies but virtually in every one. Expensive birth control or abortion, the pay gap, maternity leave, rape culture, these are only a few ways women are controlled on a day to day basis. It is the job of women to join hands and fight the injustices they are subjected to.

Cover Image Credit: flickr

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My Catholic School Would Never Do What The Covington Catholic #MAGAteens Did

I went to Catholic school since preschool and even with divided political beliefs, I have faith no one would have acted this way.

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I went to Catholic school my whole life. From preschool through high school.

The high school I went to definitely had divided political beliefs, but we embraced it. Instead of having a divide, we came together with clubs supporting voter registration and activism in your party of choice. We had a civics course and government course that required us to volunteer for campaigns.

On the religious side of things, we were required to complete service hours and it encouraged us to make change, learn about different cultures, and become involved. Throughout my time at Catholic school, I never was targetted by my race, political beliefs, or my view on religion.

It was not until I went to college outside of California that I started seeing changes in how people react to diversity. I am proud to have been raised in an environment that would have shut down and owned up to any severe or harmful actions their students would take.

In the era of a racial and political divide, it is important to remember the values that you were taught. Especially, when you involve religion.

The most important lesson I learned from Catholic school is to love your neighbor as yourself.

We are more similar than we are different. Especially in a melting pot like America. Become educated and aware before you target a group of people, who have not harmed you.

We can all learn a lot from the way Nathan Phillips handled the situation and we should all be alarmed about who was targetting him: the youth, the next generation.

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6 Extremely Enjoyable Activities To Do This Eid That'll Unwrap Your Excitement

Ready to make this Eid one you'll never forget?
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Aaaannnndd just like that Ramadan is over. The month where we give up so many of the simple liberties we take for granted. However, now that we are at the conclusion there is a need for celebration: Eid! This is one of the two grandest religious celebrations in the year.

As a kid, I always looked for the fun activities and games that my parents and family would plan for us. Having younger siblings myself, I now realize the importance of such activities and its affect on their childhood. Even if your a teen, elderly, parent or even a toddler, everyone should immerse themselves in this marvelous day. From the sticky hands after eating all the sweets physically possible to the joy witnessed when giving others gifts, Eid is a time to remember! Here are some ways you can make your Eid one you will never forget.

1. Decorations

Thank God they still work from last year. Finally, its time to take out those Eid lights and go crazy. Try to spice it up a bit and make handmade Eid decorations and hang them up. Make your house sparkle inside and out.

2. Get festive

Yes, that's the attitude. Well...maybe don't plan on going around breaking things, but try to build up your excitement. Buy new clothes for Eid, get your henna done or give yourself a facial. Allah (swt) has given you this joyous celebration so take advantage of it to the fullest. Fuel up on the contagious Eid energy and let it explode!

3. An Eid scavenger hunt

People of all age including adults tend to enjoy this game. I remember as a little girl I loved this game and used to be so competitive.

While all the cousins would sit downstairs watching a movie, all the adults would go around the house and hide all their gifts as well as scatter candy all around the house. Each child had his or her own map that they had to follow. Whoever collected the most candy (which were like extra bonus point) as well as collected all their gifts the fastest was the winner.

If creating a map is too hard, especially if you have a lot of people, create clues instead and watch as everyone walks around the house scratching their heads trying to find out where their next gift could be.

4. Secret Eidi

That's probably going to be the reaction you get every time. The day of (or maybe a few days before Eid comes), put the names of all of your family members in a hat. One by one each one picks a secret name. Everyone playing should have a pre-existing Eid list and a budget for each person (usually no more than $100).

Then when the time comes, each person reveals who they got and gives them their gift. Make sure you're strict with not letting anybody slip up who they got. Keep it a secret until its time for everyone to reveal their secret someone.

5. Family time

It's the moments with your family that you will remember the most. The laughter, the surprises, the grand feasts! It warms you inside and out. If you're invited to a bunch of Eid parties all day long, remember to cut out a little time to spend solely with your family.

6. Treat yourself

This is an explicit nod to all the parents out there. Just because it's Eid doesn't mean you slave away in the kitchen or give yourselves up trying to make your kids happy. It's your time to celebrate as well. Weather its a trip to the spa, an at home facial or massage by your kids or gifts, enjoy it. You deserve it!

SEE ALSO: 7 Last Minute Gifts For Eid

Cover Image Credit: @willianjusten

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