'Afraid' Is Not Knowing If You Can Openly Be Yourself, NOT Whether You Can State Your Political Opinion

'Afraid' Is Not Knowing If You Can Openly Be Yourself, NOT Whether You Can State Your Political Opinion

You choose your political support. I can't choose what I am.

132
views

Apparently, Republicans and Trump supporters feel "afraid" or "uncomfortable" expressing their opinions and political affiliations in a "liberal" world. I've certainly read quite a few articles on here from college-age Republicans who've stated so.

And it's laughable because they don't really know what it feels like to be afraid.

"Afraid" is not feeling like you can publicly be yourself. That you can't fully own your identity and embrace it, because there are people out there who hate you for everything you are and would harm you without feeling guilty.

"Afraid" is not knowing if it's safe to tell someone your religious identity.

"Afraid" is not feeling like you can come out on your sexuality because people, possibly even your own family, may hate you.

"Afraid" is knowing that you could be hurt or killed because your skin color isn't white. And that would be the only reason. And your assaulter might not even get properly punished for it.

I once had a coworker tell me if I ever came out as bisexual, he'd never speak to me again. Like that was his breaking point. Speaks volumes about this world we live in, huh?

I am Jewish. I fear being attacked for my religion. And considering the rise in anti-Semitic events lately, even on my own college campus, that's an increasingly valid fear. It's currently Hannukah, and I'm scared to have my family's lights visible from the street because someone might decide to attack us since we're openly signally we're Jewish. I work in a kosher coffee place and fear someone may come in with a gun. My sisters attend Jewish day schools and my mother works in one; I fear a school shooting could take place. My father wears a yarmulke and I fear that someone could see and choose to hurt him.

I'm a woman. I live in fear of being sexually assaulted everywhere I go. I'm afraid to go places alone, even if it's the 5-minute walk from campus to the parking garage, because it doesn't take long for something to happen.

I have trans friends. They fear discrimination, hate, physical attacks, and being written out of existence by our transphobic president and politicians. They are goddamn good people who shouldn't have to worry about doing literally anything because someone may hate who they are.

I'm bisexual. I and everyone else in the LGBTQ community are faced with homophobia and hate. We're afraid for our lives, afraid to come out because sometimes we don't know if our own families would be okay with us. I'm blessed enough to have a Jewish family that is okay with LGBTQ, but others are not as fortunate.

I watch my classmates, my white, cisgender, straight classmates, move through life only worrying about college and work. They're not affected by the shit I deal with. They will never fully understand how it feels to live your life in fear of being hurt, attacked, or even killed for your identity.

Because even if they're allies, they may never truly understand.

So to all you Trump supporters and Republicans out there who claim to be afraid to express themselves? You have no idea what fear truly feels like.

Popular Right Now

16 Things You Know To Be True If Your Name Is Emily

*Immediately sends to five other friends named Emily*
19377
views

Emily. The name of legends, great poets and just overall fabulous people. Emily has been ranked among one of the most popular girl's names for literally decades, so it's no secret that people named Emily definitely have a few things to bond over.

1. You have very specific preferences on being called Em, Emmy or Emmers.

And most likely only *some* people are given this privilege.

2. Every time you meet someone named Emily you instantly bond.

OMG, our parents were some of the most unoriginal people ever! Besties!

3. But secretly, you like to think of yourself as the better Emily.

Sorry not sorry.

4. Your middle name is probably Ann, Elizabeth or Marie.

Because your name is as basic as it gets.

5. You take great pride in knowing that you were the inspiration for names like Emma, Emmy and Emmaline.

And maybe you're a little jealous that your parents didn't at least try to do something a little more unique.

6. Whether it's work or school you always have to share your name with someone.

So you're probably used to attaching the first letter of your last name or broin' out and using your last name like some sort of athlete.

7. On the flip side, you were ALWAYS able to find your name on keychains growing up.


8. And unless your barista is feeling extra grouchy, it's impossible to get your name wrong on your Starbucks cup.

Unless you're one of those Emily's that spells it like Emmaleigh... *judging you*

9. Because at least you have a name no one has to ask how to spell.

Unless, well, see above.

10. You have spent hours perfecting the ideal "E" for your signature.

Do you make a backwards "3" or do you do a loopy lowercase "e?" The choice is yours.

11. And you definitely went through a phase where you dotted the "i" in hearts.

Because you just wanted to go for that extra ~GiRlY~ effect.

12. Your friends know better than to call your name in a public place.

Unless they want at least three people turning around.

13. Someone has texted you thinking they're talking to a different Emily.

Nope, nope. I'm Emily G., not Emily L.

14. You can appreciate that when you write the word Emily it's perfectly even on both sides.

15. And contains the perfect amount of loops.

16. Because while it might be super common, it's popular for a reason

Cover Image Credit: M Star News

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

'The Farewell' Brings An Asian-American Narrative To Hollywood

I've never imagined that a story like this would make its way to Hollywood, and it's definitely a welcome change.

soniatam
soniatam
187
views

The trailer for Lulu Wang's "The Farewell" was recently released. The film, based on Wang's own experience, stars Awkwafina as Billi, a Chinese-American woman who travels to China after learning her grandmother has been diagnosed with terminal lung cancer. "The Farewell" initially debuted at the 2019 Sundance Film Festival in January, and currently holds a rating of 100% on Rotten Tomatoes.

"The Farewell" is an exciting film for members of the Asian-American community, as it encompasses many of our own experiences in having family overseas. Having this Asian-American narrative portrayed in Hollywood is especially groundbreaking and important to the community. "Crazy Rich Asians" has received much well-deserved acclaim for its leap in Asian representation, but the film did not necessarily depict a completely relatable experience and was only one story out of many in the Asian-American community. There were aspects of the characters' cultures that allowed the Asian-American audience to connect with much of the film, but the upper-class narrative wasn't quite as accessible to everyone.

While "Crazy Rich Asians" portrays Asians in a way that is very much uncommon in Hollywood and American media in general and had a hand in helping to break stereotypes, "The Farewell" introduces a nearly universal first-generation American or immigrant narrative to Hollywood. In doing so, the film allows many members of the Asian-American community to truly see their own experiences and their own stories on the screen.

For me, the trailer alone was enough to make me tear up, and I've seen many other Asian Americans share a similar experience in seeing the trailer. The film reminds us of our own families, whether it's our grandparents or any other family living overseas. I've never imagined that a story like this would make its way to Hollywood, and it's definitely a welcome change.

"The Farewell," which is scheduled for release on July 12, 2019, depicts a family dynamic in the Asian-American experience that hits home for many, including myself. The initial critical response, especially towards Awkwafina's performance, is certainly promising and will hopefully motivate more Asian-American and other minority filmmakers to bring their own stories to Hollywood.

soniatam
soniatam

Related Content

Facebook Comments