Tuning In

Tuning In

Part Two

958
views

"Shoot me now."

"Can't. We have a road trip tomorrow. I refuse to suffer alone."

"Bully."

"You know you love me."

I let out a snort.

"Yeah, sure. Let's go with that."

"I can hear you rolling your eyes Mads."

"You know me too well."

"I'm going to turn in. I've still gotta pack before your mom wakes us up at the crack of dawn."

"We're not even coming to get you until ten."

"Crack. Of. Dawn."

"Alright, well get your beauty sleep. I'll see you tomorrow."

"Night."

"Night."

I set my alarm and stared at my ceiling thinking about what my mom had said to me about Fletcher. We'd always been inseparable but I'd never thought of him as boyfriend material. Fletcher had a type and I definitely didn't fit into that mold. His girlfriends so far had all been petite, blonde, athletes. My red hair, tall stature, and drama geek personality didn't really fit into that.

"Not that it matters," I muttered to myself.

Fletcher and I were just friends. We'd always been just friends and there's no way that I was going to complicate our relationship just because my mom thought we'd be cute together.

I woke up with a start to the screeching of my alarm. I groaned as I turned my alarm off. I could hear my mother shuffling around downstairs. I could picture her running around, grabbing everything on her checklist from the various places where she'd stashed them.

"Maddie, are you up yet?" she called from downstairs.

"Yeah, Mom. Be down in a minute!"

"You'd better already be packed!"

"Yeah, yeah," I muttered.

I grabbed the few things that I hadn't packed and shoved them in my bag. I pulled on jeans, my favorite band tee, and a hoodie before heading downstairs.

"Bag?" My mom asked with her hand out.

I handed it over.

"Anything I can do to help?"

"Call Fletcher. Who knows if that boy is actually awake or not yet."

"Okay. Anything else?"

"I have your father loading the car. So, everything is covered."

"Breakfast?"

"We'll stop after we pick up Fletcher."

"Alright."

I hit the icon for Fletcher on my phone and waited for him to pick up.

"Hello?" a groggy voice answered.

"Dude, mom is going to flip if you aren't packed by the time we get there."

"Oh, hi Mads."

"Get your butt up and packed. She's promised breakfast after we pick you up."

"Okay, okay, I'm up. Text me when you're on the way."

"Maddie, we're leaving now!"

"You might want to pack really fast. We're leaving now."

"Crap!"

"See you soon!"

I ended the call and raced out to the car.

"Is he awake?"

"Getting packed now."

My mom shook her head.

"That boy."

"You'd think you'd be used to it by now." I teased.

My mom smiled.

"Oh, I am. I just have hope that one day he won't do everything last minute."

"Yeah, I wouldn't hold your breath."

We drove to Fletch's house. My mom beeped the horn. I couldn't help but laugh as I took in Fletch pulling a hoodie over his head with one hand and his overflowing bag held closed with other. He raced over to the car, threw his bag in the back and hopped in. he flashed a smile.

"Who's ready for breakfast?"

Popular Right Now

Dear Mom, From Your Daughter In College

Here are all the things our phone calls aren't long enough to say.
599842
views

Dear Mom,

Do you remember when I was three and we would play together?

It was the age of princesses and carpet that was actually lava, and you were the prettiest woman in the whole wide world. Do you remember when I was in high school and the world seemed too big and scary? You would know exactly when to take me on a mother-daughter date and have me laughing about anything and everything, and you were the smartest woman in the whole wide world.

Now, I'm buried in homework and deadlines hours away from you and we don't get to talk as much you want, but you're still the prettiest, smartest woman in the whole wide world.

I'm sorry that I don't call you as much as I should, and you know a lot of what goes on in my world via posts and pictures. Our schedules just seem to never line up so we can have the three-hour conversations about everything like I want to. I know we don't agree on absolutely everything, but I cherish every piece of advice you give me, even though it probably seems like I'm hardly listening.

I know that sometimes we get on each other's nerves, but thank you for putting up with me for all of these years. Thank you for listening to me cry, complain, question things and go on and on about how everything in college is. I know I don't come home as much as I used to, but I think about you all the time. After all, you're my first friend, and therefore, my best friend.

Thank you for celebrating my successes with me, and not downing me too hard for my failures. Thank you for knowing what mistakes I shouldn't make, but letting me make them anyway because you want me to live my life and be my own person. Thank you for knowing when to ask about the boy I've been talking about, and when to stop without any questions. Thank you for letting me be my crazy, weird, sometimes know-it-all self.

Thank you for sitting back and watching me spread my wings and fly. There is no way I could have known how to grow into the woman I am today if I hadn't watched you while I was growing up so I would know what kind of person I should aspire to be. Thank you for being the first (and the best) role model I ever had. You continue to inspire and amaze me every day with all that you do, and all that you are.

I don't know how I got so lucky to have a person in my life like you, but I thank the Lord every night for blessing me with the smartest, prettiest person to be my best friend, my role model, my confidant, my person and most importantly, my mother.

Love,

Your daughter

Cover Image Credit: Pexels

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

Your Relationship With Your Parents Changes Over Time, Here's Why

Four ways in which your relationship with your parents change from age eighteen to twenty-two.

49
views

Over spring break I had time to think about all the different ways in which my relationship with my parents has changed throughout college. We've definitely had our ups and downs, but as graduation grows closer, I take time to note how far we have come. From freshman to senior year of college I have undergone a drastic change in how I appreciate my parents.

At eighteen, I wanted to get as far away from my parents as possible. I was going to college in order to be independent, study, and hopefully make a career for myself. Nothing could stop me and no one could give me advice. I was stubborn and hungry to explore the new life that awaited me. I didn't realize how hard it would be being on my own for the first time ever. I had never even been to camp let alone moved to a different state not knowing a single soul. I was happy for the new opportunities but quickly realized how much I had been sheltered. Initially, I resented my parents for my little life experience going into college but as the years have passed I realized I can't be so immature to put my lack of knowledge on them. As an adult I now make things work and advocate for myself. Your struggles as an individual humble you so you can come back together better and stronger than before.

Here are some ways in which the relationship between you and your parents change:

1. You don't live together 24/7, so you appreciate time spent with them.

When you're not sharing a space with your parents and they are not there to nag at you about chores, you finally get to know them as people. As an adult yourself you begin to relate to them in ways that weren't possible in childhood.

2. You realize what is worth fighting over and what is not.

You have learned how to live on your own and set boundaries. As an adult, you come back home knowing what can be improved upon within the relationship and what are things you can let go.

3. You have experience with adulthood now and can understand how really great they are.

Adult struggles are real and now as someone older and wiser, you have experienced a great many. You then begin to realize how your parents took on all these responsibilities plus the responsibility of raising/providing for you. You don't know how they did it, but suddenly you're mad at sixteen-year-old you who fought them on everything.

4. They are your biggest support system in wanting you to achieve your dreams.

There is no one quite as invested in your dreams like your parents. When you have no one to turn to and nothing to give you that extra boost of motivation, parents are there. They may not be perfect but they love you more than anyone so call your parents.

Related Content

Facebook Comments