I Visited Newfoundland And I Can Honestly Say The Trip Changed My Life

I Visited Newfoundland And I Can Honestly Say The Trip Changed My Life

Add this beautiful place to your travel bucket list.
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During the summer of 2017, after I graduated from high school, my friends and I traveled to Newfoundland, Canada, a small rock in the Pacific Ocean off of the coast of Quebec. The four of us went in July with some of the family of one of our group members. That's why we went to Newfoundland in the first place: one of us had two parents who were from Newfoundland. I had seen pictures of what the places we were going to visit looked like, but nothing could have prepared me for the breathtaking beauty of Bonavista, Gros Morne, St. Johns, and Bar Haven.

I was lucky enough to get to see what felt like every part of the island during my visit, because we drove from St. Johns, which is kind of on the south coast, to Bonavista, which is kind of on a northern coast, to Gros Morne, which was all the way on the east coast. The car trips were more memorable than I thought any car trip could be, just because the scenery was so beautiful.

The trees would fade to flat, grassy areas, which would fade to rocky areas, and every now and then we would come across peaceful bodies of standing water. It was all so beautiful, and I want to go back just so I can take time to just sit in nature.

I think everyone should visit Newfoundland because there is something for everyone.

If you aren't big on hiking or other outdoorsy type things, this might not be the best place to go, but there are things to do that don't involve being immersed in the outdoors. You can go to St. Johns, the small city, where there is an abundance of beautiful views and things to do. However, if you like being in the outdoors, then you really get to be selective about what you want to do.

You can go to Gros Morne, or any of the other national parks, and pick between being in the woods or being by the beach. There are cabins, there are spots for tent camping. There are bike trails, there are hiking trails, there are waterfalls to see, there are small streams and sharp cliffs.

I advise going to the sleepy town of Bona Vista, though. There is no shortage of beautiful sights to see and fun things to do there. You can spend a whole day on the rocky beach marveling at the power of the ocean. I don't advise getting in the icy water, though, mostly because it's so cold. There are waterbird and whale watching tours.

There are also many places to watch birds of all kinds nesting on the cliffs. The puffins are a favorite of mine. They're a lot smaller than I expected them to be, and they're incredibly photogenic. There are also many breathtaking sites to go and see, and many places to get soft serve ice cream.

The simplicity of the town and the way everyone lives really changed my life, and I really think it is worth it to go and spend some time getting closer to nature, and then closer to yourself as well. When you really break things down to the center of it all, you can discover what you value the most and what things are truly essential. For me, while I was in Newfoundland, I realized that I really valued my friends and family more than I had realized before.

My friends and I had a lot of fun exploring everywhere we went. We had a pull towards the ocean and the rocks. We wanted to find those stunning views. We wanted to exist together one last time before we went our separate ways at college. Because of that, the trip had a kind of sadness weaved into it that I couldn't shake. But also because of this, Newfoundland has a kind of sentimentality for me, and it always will.

Even though the trip didn't go perfectly (because who could perfectly handle three weeks in very close quarters with three other people?) Newfoundland and it's beauty have a very important spot in my heart because it reminds me of my friends, how young I am (especially when compared to the ancient force of the earth), and what really matters to me.

I think, while on this trip and seeing so many people live simple, fulfilling lives, I realized that love and happiness are more important to me than wealth and power. And knowing that love and happiness are what I want to reach at the end of the road has made all of the difference in my life as I've moved forward through college.

I do have to say, don't get too close to the cliff edges. Do talk to the people who live in the area. They are kind and have stories to tell, just like everyone else, but they are maybe a little more eager and willing to tell their stories. Do know that even though my friends and I climbed over our fare share of rocks close to the ocean, we were supposed to be doing that. Be adventurous, but do it carefully, and spread kindness.

Cover Image Credit: Olivia McKnight

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13 Life-Saving Safety Tips To Know BEFORE Your Summer Parties And Travels

These tips could make or break a vacation, depending on if you want to follow them or not.

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Summer is something we all look forward to, but we tend to forget about our safety when we are out and about. From going to the zoo to going out to the bar, everyone is at risk because unfortunately there are bad people in the world. It is important to keep things like this in mind.

Boys, girls, men, and women are taken every single day by sex traffickers all around the world. People are sexually abused, and last but not least people are exposed to bad things like dirty needles, broken glass, and other factors that can turn a great night into a horror story.

In order to shed light on these things and give the public a reminder, I compiled this list.

1. Don't set your drink down/watch your drink in big crowds

"Don't set your drink down" is one of the oldest rules in the book. Sadly enough, I've watched girls get things dropped into their drinks while they are dancing and holding it up in the air in big crowds. The man standing behind you at the concert may seem harmless, but you never know if he's planning on dropping a disorienting pill into your drink; pay attention at all times.

2. Don't let your friends leave the bar alone: rule of pairs

Whenever you go somewhere, especially at night, take someone with you. If anything happens, you'll always have someone else to run and get help. This goes for falling off your bike and skinning your knee to someone trying to grab you and pull you into their van. Two is always better than one.

3. Carry pepper spray, a knife, or, if you are comfortable enough, a gun

When you are walking alone at night just a few seconds worth of pepper spray can save your life. Personally, I carry a knife. I carry a Leatherman in a little cloth case on my belt. It's not too bulky and from afar it looks like it could possibly be a small handgun. The look of it alone could deter someone away from me in a bad situation.

If you aren't comfortable carrying these things, holding a set of keys in between your fingers is also another way to protect yourself if a bad situation did arise.

4. Be cautious about Uber, Lyft, and taxi services

When an Uber is coming to pick you up, ask them who they are there to pick up. Ask them their name as well. Before you get in the vehicle, open the door and make sure the child lock is off. Before getting into the car you should take a picture of the license plate and send it to a few of your friends. You can never be too safe.

5. Share your location with a group of close friends or family members 

I share my location with almost all of my friends. If something were to happen they would know exactly where I am. It would be an even better idea to share your "Find My iPhone" username and password with a friend or two because you can locate someone much easier that way. From my own personal experience, I know that the Find My iPhone app works much better than simply sharing your location. If you have an Android/Galaxy phone there are probably applications specific to them for location sharing as well.

6. Before going on a date with someone new... do the following:

If they are picking you up in their vehicle, try to snap a photo of their license plate. You should do this even if the person seems trustworthy because you never know what someone is truly thinking inside of their head. If you plan on going out to eat, tell your friends when and where. The more other people know, the safer you are. Check out their social media pages to make sure they are who they are saying they are. Do a little bit of research and utilize the tools that you have at your fingertips (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, etc.) Again, you can never be too safe.

7. Don't let your children leave your sight! 

Lately, I've read too many articles about children getting taken at fairs and other public events. One that I read said that the mother let her 5-or-6-year-old walk to the port-a-potty alone (right around the corner) and they never came back. It can happen so easily when it is the last thing on your mind.

If you have a younger child, send an older sibling with them. Make sure that you tell your children what to look for when it comes to someone watching them. If there is someone standing alone, wearing sunglasses, and pointing their phone at your children, it could be completely innocent and coincidental... but what if it's not? Watch out for the signs and warnings and educate your children.

8. Know where the nearest police station/ hospital is located

I actually never thought about this until I started working on the pipeline. Before each day of work we typically meet as a crew and locate the nearest hospital. We do this so that there is less confusion if an accident happens. The same thing goes for when you are on vacation to somewhere new. If you are walking and slice your foot an inch deep on a piece of glass, the last thing you want to worry about it finding a hospital to go to. When that is already predetermined it makes bad situations easier to handle.

The same thing goes for a police station. If you and a friend are out on the town and someone harasses you or does something disorderly, it would be beneficial to know where the police station is located. I know you're thinking "why wouldn't I just call 911?"

Well, think about this. What if your phone dies, your apple watch gets crushed trying to fight back in whatever situation you are in, or your phone just gets broken. You may have to run to the nearest police station or run to the nearest home to use someone else's phone.

I can't say this enough, it's better to be safe than sorry. It takes 10 seconds to look up the nearest hospital and police station before a night out. Utilize the tools you have and put your safety first.

9. Before going on vacation, read reviews 

I'll use beaches as an example. There are some really amazing, friendly, and clean beaches you can go to in the United States. With the internet in reach, use it and read about the place you are going to. Every so often a family will plan a getaway and arrive ready to enjoy the week, but if you pick a location where drug addiction is a known problem you are putting yourself and your children at risk. I understand that drug use is an issue everywhere, but it's worse in some places than it is in others. No one wants to be exposed to a dirty needle that someone left laying hidden in the beach sand. Using tools like Yelp and Google reviews can prevent little things like this from happening.

Tip: It's important to check the status of the water before you go somewhere. Sometimes, the water is infected with bacteria and other similar diseases that prevent you from swimming in the water.

10. Be aware of sex trafficking hot spots 

They are unfortunately all over the place. I currently live in Ohio, and I know that Columbus and Toledo are two big places where sex trafficking takes place. I have family that live in Michigan, and I know that Ann Arbor and Detroit are dangerous when it comes to that, too. Whenever I go to those places my guard is extra high and I pay attention to detail.

It's easy to let your guard down when you are out having fun, but no fun is worth risking your life over.

11. Trust your gut 

If you go out to a party with friends and feel uncomfortable, leave. Do not second guess your feelings or stay to please a friend.

12. Don't park next to vans/be aware if a van is parked next to you

It seems silly and a bit dramatic, but you never know. If there is a van parked next to your vehicle when you are leaving work, go back into work and have someone walk you out to your vehicle. In cities with high populations, this happens every day. You walk out to your car, the van doors open up, and you are never seen again.

13. Pay attention to detail 

Throughout this list, I've stated things that you should pay close attention to. Overall, you need to be paying attention to detail. When you are walking at night and there is someone walking 20 feet behind you with their hood up, that is a red flag. Call a friend or family member until you make it home safe. When you are walking around at the store and you continue to see the same person in your aisle, notify someone and express your worries. Watch people and their body language, and learn how to read it. Have an escape plan in situations that make you uncomfortable.

Although this list is probably full of things that have been pounded into your head over the years, it's never bad to refresh your mind. Keep yourself safe, keep your friends safe, and keep your family safe. There are hundreds of young aged boys and girls out there that may have never heard of things like this before. People too often let themselves think that a bad situation is a coincidence.

This list isn't meant to scare you, and life is made to live and have fun. If you just take the extra time to educate yourself, you should be able to live freely, happily, and safely. Share and be aware!

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My Future Is Unpredictable And That's Totally Alright

As I prepare for study abroad in Ecuador, I'm going in with no expectations.

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For six months, I had plans to study abroad in the Dominican Republic during the fall semester of junior year. Filling out what seemed like endless applications and paperwork, searching for travel ideas on Pinterest, and writing a class research paper on the DR's relationship with its neighboring island, Haiti, I was prepared to live and learn about Dominican culture hands-on.

Then on the Thursday before Finals Week last spring, I read my email. My study abroad program in the DR had gotten canceled. In the span of 30 seconds, my future had taken a new course. Less than a week later, I was submitting papers to study abroad in a new country where another adventure awaited: Ecuador.

If there's anything I've learned in the past year, it's that life is unpredictable and we can't control it. The future is unknown. But-

Who wants to know exactly what's going to happen in the next few years? I mean, I believe it's good to have a direction, but you don't have to have the entire journey pinpointed straight to the core. You meet people, you get inspired, you see things, you have experiences. And you go from there. (Though, I totally respect people who have clear ambitions and stick with them their entire lives.)

Where I was a year ago was a completely different path than where I find myself today. Last summer, I worked four different internships/jobs in the span of three months. A year ago, I would never have guessed my following summer unfolding with an immersion trip to India, a solo adventure to Taiwan & Hong Kong, and becoming a certified yoga instructor. A year ago, I hadn't met half of my best friends. A year ago, I hadn't seen poverty in a third-world country. A year ago, I wasn't even sure I wanted to major in Environmental Studies.

Just because I don't know what the future holds doesn't mean I can't set goals. I have a destination, an idea of where I'm headed and where I want to go. While abroad in Ecuador, I want to learn about sustainable development and coffee production as well as enhance my Spanish skills.

As I prepare for study abroad in Ecuador, I'm going in with no expectations. I know the format of the program. I'll be taking classes and living with a host family and then doing an internship at a farm. Otherwise, I have no idea what's going to happen. And that's what I'm looking forward to the most. The spontaneity. The unexpected. As one of my good friends would say whenever he doesn't have formal weekend plans, "I'm improvising." And you know the one rule of improv: Always say yes.

¡Hasta pronto, Ecuador!

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