To My Family When I Come Home

To My Family When I Come Home

I'm kind of an adult now, so I'm going to need you to be patient with me.
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About nine months ago, you left me in front of my dorm, tears in both of our eyes, all by myself. As my first year away from you comes to a close, I'm getting ready to return to the nest. And I can guess you're either feeling really excited to have your baby back, or you are wishing the semester would last a little longer. But whether you're ready or not, I'm coming home.

It's been quieter around the house. You haven't had to drive to games, activities, appointments, and events for me. One less person to clean for, one less person to cook for, and one less person to feel responsible for. It's OK to admit that you've enjoyed it.

I loved my first year away from home. I tasted freedom like I never have before, and I would like to think I was safe and smart about it. I figured out how to take care of myself in every way, shape and form -- I manage my own time, I feed myself, and I get myself from point A to point B. In just a few short months, I've learned so much about myself and the world outside of our little town. It has been an amazing experience.

I'm kind of an adult now, and as I adjust to life back home, I'm asking you to be patient with me. I have spent so much time getting used to a new lifestyle where I can make up my own rules and decide when I want to follow them; it may take me a while to remember how things used to be when I was here all the time.

Please remember that I just busted my butt academically in the two hardest semesters of my life and I'm exhausted. I don't want to think about classes or my grades or anything related to my major -- I just want to enjoy my summer.

Don't get angry with me if I forget to put my dish in the dishwasher or don't do my laundry for two weeks -- when I was living on my own, I could do whatever I wanted. I know I have to live by your rules when I'm home, but give me some time to adjust. I promise I'm not a slob when I'm at school -- I'm just a college student.

I've been away from home for so long and there is so much I missed when I was gone. So please, let me pick that local restaurant I love for dinner and allow me to hang out with friends every night if I want to. I've missed the things I left behind and I'm only home for four short months, so I have to enjoy it while I'm here. I promise to spend time with you before I go back to school.

But mostly, I want to say thank you. Thank you for supporting me and loving me through all the tough times this year brought. All the phone calls, worried texts about my taxes, FaceTime sessions with the dog, and surprise weekend visits helped me survive my first year away from home. No matter where I go and how long I'm gone, I'll always be your baby and I will always appreciate everything you've done for me.

No more exams, presentations, meetings, or lectures. For the first time in a long time, I'm all yours. And even though I'm coming home now, soon I will be leaving again -- so let me enjoy my time home with you.

Cover Image Credit: Mulpix

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18 Things That Happen When You Get A Good Roommate

Not every roommate story is a bad one.
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Whenever you hear about roommate stories, they're almost never good, and they usually scare you into never wanting a roommate. "Did you hear her roommate steals her clothes?" "Her roommate doesn't shower!" "Wow, her roommate doesn't talk at all, and doesn't do laundry." From what I hear, there are more bad stories than good. That is why I consider myself lucky, because my roommate is nothing like one of those bad stories. When life hands you a good roommate after talking to about 40 girls through Facebook, a few things happen.

1. You always have someone to talk to.

2. You know each other's schedules, and whenever you both have a break is an exciting time.

3. You'll never have to dance alone.


4. You always have someone to do something with, even if it's just walking down the hall.

5. You both look out for each other, because this is your first time without your parents.

6. You always have a shoulder to lean on when things get tough.

7. Borrowing each other's things is a daily thing.

8. You TRY to help with each other's homework and assignments.

9. They're encouraging when it comes to boys. (Unless they're a f*ckboy.)

10. They're your biggest support system and your personal cheerleader.

11. They never forget to wish you luck on a big exam.

12. They accept how gross you are in the morning and not so pleasant sometimes.

13. You both know each other's favorite and least favorite things.

14. Leaving each other notes saying goodbye before class if you don't see them is normal.

15. Saying goodbye for breaks is upsetting.

16. Not seeing them all day is upsetting.

17. You have more pictures together than any of your other friends.

18. You found a best friend for life.

Cover Image Credit: Jordan Griffin

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No, I'm Not In A Sorority

At a big university like Syracuse, Greek life is a normalized life style. When you're not involved, it can feel isolating.

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Warning: Do not read if you are easily offended by slight criticism on Social Greek Life.

Upon meeting a new person at school, the conversation-starter-questions go as followed and without fail: "What's your name? What year are you? What house are you in?"

As a non-Greek life affiliated girl, this quick assumption that I have to be in a sorority is, frankly, annoying. The assumptions made about you when you reveal that you don't pay absurd amounts of money to meet others and have scheduled parties figured out for you are even more bothersome.

I am automatically viewed a certain way. When I tell girls I am unassociated with Greek life, a look of pity takes over their face.

A short and shocking statement: Not everyone wants to rush your, or any, sorority! I could if I wanted to, but I simply do not. The notion that my college experience is immediately less fun or valuable is a crude assumption.

I understand the fact that everyone feels a need to find "their people." If your way is paying thousands of dollars and becoming "sisters" with the girls that treated you less than human during your pledge process, by all means, have at it! That being said, do not judge or automatically make assumptions about me because I chose to find my people and passions in a different way.

There is a certain exclusivity many members of Greek life possess. For those uninvolved, it can be isolating. You see your friends go off to planned parties with others that were hand-picked by the members the year above them. They are handed a group of girls and immediately have this set of "sisters" they flock to.

That being said, I'm sure sororities do have their pros. That doesn't mean everyone wants to join one. That doesn't mean I am any less of a Syracuse University student because I am not involved. In my opinion, your identity should not be synonymous with a "house."

Girls: you are more than those letters.

Boys: you are more than the greatness of the parties you throw on Friday nights.

Do not make anyone feel less because they don't feel the desire to give a part of their life to a sorority or fraternity.

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