​9 Things To Do In Galway, Ireland

​9 Things To Do In Galway, Ireland

A city that's so much more than the song.

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Galway, Ireland is one of my favorite places in the world. Not too long after planning my trip there, Ed Sheeran released "Galway Girl." The song definitely an expression of the people there, but this small city has so much more depth. Here's what you can do in the "City of the Tribes": Galway.


1. Visit the Claddagh Ring Museum.

Europe's smallest museum is right in Old City Galway. It's the original makers of the Claddagh Ring. The Claddagh is named after Galway's neighboring town and represents love, friendship, and loyalty. The Claddagh has been worn for hundreds of years, and you can visit the original shop.

2. Walk through Eyre Square.

Eyre Square sits in the middle of Galway. It's an adorable little park with statues and art. Along the street, the flags of the original tribes of Galway are on display. Each of these tribes had a hand in running the city.

3. Visit O'Connell's Pub.

This is the very pub that Ed Sheeran filmed his famous music video, "Galway Girl," in. You can go in and even meet the bartender featured in the video.

4. Meet Oscar Wilde.

...or a statue of him. There's a statue of the famous writer on William Street sitting and patiently waiting for you.

5. Visit the Spanish Arch.

Many people end up walking through the Spanish Arch while they search for it. I know I did, twice! This archway marked the port that Spanish boats would travel through to dock in Galway. The Spanish did a lot of trading with the city of Galway. Some even settled in the city and had their own families. Even today, some of the citizens of Galway can trace their roots to these Spanish merchants.

6. Tie a ribbon on Wolfe Tone Bridge.

This bridge crosses the River Corrib and has a steel railing that runs along the sidewalk. Many tourists tie ribbons to the bars as a sign of... well, no one really knows. It's meant to give the same aesthetic effect as bridges with locks on them to represent love. It's just your way to leave your mark on Galway.

7. Go to the beach.

Yes, Ireland does have beaches. Just across Wolfe Tone Bridge in Claddagh, there is a park and beach with an incredible view of the North Atlantic Ocean. On the pathway to the sand, there's a memorial up honoring those who left Ireland during the Potato Famine. For many Irish who were emigrating, this was the last site they saw of their country.

8. Walk down Quay Street.

A part of the original city, Quay Street has so much culture, shopping, and music. It's always filled with happy tourists, college students, and Galwegians. You can always find musicians playing and people talking about the city's rich history.

9. Meet some of the most kind and genuine people on Earth.

The people of Galway are not only proud of their city, but happy to share it with others. Their welcoming attitude adds so much to the beautiful atmosphere. Everyone there is happy to help and share their stories.

Galway is more than a song; it's a beautiful place with beautiful people. It's easily my favorite city in the world. It's no wonder it's the Cultural Capital of Ireland.

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13 Life-Saving Safety Tips To Know BEFORE Your Summer Parties And Travels

These tips could make or break a vacation, depending on if you want to follow them or not.

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Summer is something we all look forward to, but we tend to forget about our safety when we are out and about. From going to the zoo to going out to the bar, everyone is at risk because unfortunately there are bad people in the world. It is important to keep things like this in mind.

Boys, girls, men, and women are taken every single day by sex traffickers all around the world. People are sexually abused, and last but not least people are exposed to bad things like dirty needles, broken glass, and other factors that can turn a great night into a horror story.

In order to shed light on these things and give the public a reminder, I compiled this list.

1. Don't set your drink down/watch your drink in big crowds

"Don't set your drink down" is one of the oldest rules in the book. Sadly enough, I've watched girls get things dropped into their drinks while they are dancing and holding it up in the air in big crowds. The man standing behind you at the concert may seem harmless, but you never know if he's planning on dropping a disorienting pill into your drink; pay attention at all times.

2. Don't let your friends leave the bar alone: rule of pairs

Whenever you go somewhere, especially at night, take someone with you. If anything happens, you'll always have someone else to run and get help. This goes for falling off your bike and skinning your knee to someone trying to grab you and pull you into their van. Two is always better than one.

3. Carry pepper spray, a knife, or, if you are comfortable enough, a gun

When you are walking alone at night just a few seconds worth of pepper spray can save your life. Personally, I carry a knife. I carry a Leatherman in a little cloth case on my belt. It's not too bulky and from afar it looks like it could possibly be a small handgun. The look of it alone could deter someone away from me in a bad situation.

If you aren't comfortable carrying these things, holding a set of keys in between your fingers is also another way to protect yourself if a bad situation did arise.

4. Be cautious about Uber, Lyft, and taxi services

When an Uber is coming to pick you up, ask them who they are there to pick up. Ask them their name as well. Before you get in the vehicle, open the door and make sure the child lock is off. Before getting into the car you should take a picture of the license plate and send it to a few of your friends. You can never be too safe.

5. Share your location with a group of close friends or family members 

I share my location with almost all of my friends. If something were to happen they would know exactly where I am. It would be an even better idea to share your "Find My iPhone" username and password with a friend or two because you can locate someone much easier that way. From my own personal experience, I know that the Find My iPhone app works much better than simply sharing your location. If you have an Android/Galaxy phone there are probably applications specific to them for location sharing as well.

6. Before going on a date with someone new... do the following:

If they are picking you up in their vehicle, try to snap a photo of their license plate. You should do this even if the person seems trustworthy because you never know what someone is truly thinking inside of their head. If you plan on going out to eat, tell your friends when and where. The more other people know, the safer you are. Check out their social media pages to make sure they are who they are saying they are. Do a little bit of research and utilize the tools that you have at your fingertips (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, etc.) Again, you can never be too safe.

7. Don't let your children leave your sight! 

Lately, I've read too many articles about children getting taken at fairs and other public events. One that I read said that the mother let her 5-or-6-year-old walk to the port-a-potty alone (right around the corner) and they never came back. It can happen so easily when it is the last thing on your mind.

If you have a younger child, send an older sibling with them. Make sure that you tell your children what to look for when it comes to someone watching them. If there is someone standing alone, wearing sunglasses, and pointing their phone at your children, it could be completely innocent and coincidental... but what if it's not? Watch out for the signs and warnings and educate your children.

8. Know where the nearest police station/ hospital is located

I actually never thought about this until I started working on the pipeline. Before each day of work we typically meet as a crew and locate the nearest hospital. We do this so that there is less confusion if an accident happens. The same thing goes for when you are on vacation to somewhere new. If you are walking and slice your foot an inch deep on a piece of glass, the last thing you want to worry about it finding a hospital to go to. When that is already predetermined it makes bad situations easier to handle.

The same thing goes for a police station. If you and a friend are out on the town and someone harasses you or does something disorderly, it would be beneficial to know where the police station is located. I know you're thinking "why wouldn't I just call 911?"

Well, think about this. What if your phone dies, your apple watch gets crushed trying to fight back in whatever situation you are in, or your phone just gets broken. You may have to run to the nearest police station or run to the nearest home to use someone else's phone.

I can't say this enough, it's better to be safe than sorry. It takes 10 seconds to look up the nearest hospital and police station before a night out. Utilize the tools you have and put your safety first.

9. Before going on vacation, read reviews 

I'll use beaches as an example. There are some really amazing, friendly, and clean beaches you can go to in the United States. With the internet in reach, use it and read about the place you are going to. Every so often a family will plan a getaway and arrive ready to enjoy the week, but if you pick a location where drug addiction is a known problem you are putting yourself and your children at risk. I understand that drug use is an issue everywhere, but it's worse in some places than it is in others. No one wants to be exposed to a dirty needle that someone left laying hidden in the beach sand. Using tools like Yelp and Google reviews can prevent little things like this from happening.

Tip: It's important to check the status of the water before you go somewhere. Sometimes, the water is infected with bacteria and other similar diseases that prevent you from swimming in the water.

10. Be aware of sex trafficking hot spots 

They are unfortunately all over the place. I currently live in Ohio, and I know that Columbus and Toledo are two big places where sex trafficking takes place. I have family that live in Michigan, and I know that Ann Arbor and Detroit are dangerous when it comes to that, too. Whenever I go to those places my guard is extra high and I pay attention to detail.

It's easy to let your guard down when you are out having fun, but no fun is worth risking your life over.

11. Trust your gut 

If you go out to a party with friends and feel uncomfortable, leave. Do not second guess your feelings or stay to please a friend.

12. Don't park next to vans/be aware if a van is parked next to you

It seems silly and a bit dramatic, but you never know. If there is a van parked next to your vehicle when you are leaving work, go back into work and have someone walk you out to your vehicle. In cities with high populations, this happens every day. You walk out to your car, the van doors open up, and you are never seen again.

13. Pay attention to detail 

Throughout this list, I've stated things that you should pay close attention to. Overall, you need to be paying attention to detail. When you are walking at night and there is someone walking 20 feet behind you with their hood up, that is a red flag. Call a friend or family member until you make it home safe. When you are walking around at the store and you continue to see the same person in your aisle, notify someone and express your worries. Watch people and their body language, and learn how to read it. Have an escape plan in situations that make you uncomfortable.

Although this list is probably full of things that have been pounded into your head over the years, it's never bad to refresh your mind. Keep yourself safe, keep your friends safe, and keep your family safe. There are hundreds of young aged boys and girls out there that may have never heard of things like this before. People too often let themselves think that a bad situation is a coincidence.

This list isn't meant to scare you, and life is made to live and have fun. If you just take the extra time to educate yourself, you should be able to live freely, happily, and safely. Share and be aware!

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Why It Is OK To Go Home For Spring Break

Not every Spring break needs to be filled with sand and sunburns.

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I was supposed to go to the beach with a few of my sorority sisters for spring break. It was supposed to be a cute little trip to a beach town with the girls, with days spent covered in sand and sunburns. However, the morning of when we were supposed to leave, my plans fell through. It was a combination of not knowing all the details I needed to, not having a place to stay the whole time, and having the biggest wave of homesickness of the year hit me in the parking lot of a coffee shop.

Luckily, through a lot of flight searching and coordination, my parents put their heads together and found a miracle chain of cheap flights home to Nashville. It turned into a whole ordeal, considering how Nashville was in the middle of a tornado and thunderstorm fest, and I wound up sitting in O'Hare International Airport until past midnight, but all the while I could not stop smiling.

As soon as I felt the somewhat concerning touchdown of the wheels on the runway at BNA, I almost had tears of joy in my eyes. I sprinted down the long corridors of the airport and jumped into my youngest sister's and dad's arms.

The next week consisted of visiting my favorite places in town, long mornings with Mom, and countless walks around the neighborhood with Dad. I didn't even need to go to the beach to get tan, for the first walk I took with my dad I got the sunburn (and tan lines) to last me until summer. Luckily, Georgia and Belmont had the same spring break as South Carolina, so I got to get lunch with a couple of my best friends in downtown Nashville.

Spring break is the only opportunity all spring semester to go anywhere for more than two days, whether it be vacation or home. But why should "going home" not also be "going on vacation?" I am so lucky to call Nashville my home, with so much to do and so many towns around it that I have learned to love and explore. People might say "you live in a vacation city," or "you don't live in a boring place." I was maybe downtown for a total of four-and-a-half hours the entire nine days I was home. I had so much fun this spring break because I spent it with my family, and saw for the first time how much I actually did miss home.

I'll share this funny story: I was in Spanish class a few weeks ago and we were talking about holidays in the United States. My teacher asked me what I did on the Fourth of July, and I said, "yo miro los fuegos artificiales con mi familia" ("I watch fireworks with my family"). It was the most simple answer, but at that exact moment, as ridiculous as it was, it all hit me. Almost every year, I spent Independence Day away from my friends in New Jersey with my family. I loved it all except for the fact that all my friends were posting pictures from parties they would go to at home on the patriotic day. I never realized that 8 months later in a random classroom I would be wishing to be doing that same thing with my family and no one else.

So to bring this back to spring break, I used every single second of it to hang out with my parents and my sisters when they got out of school. I went to lacrosse games to visit my old team and I took so many drives in the sunshine down my favorite backroads, all the windows down even in the high forties. I realized that hanging out with my parents every day was my new favorite thing and that a conversation over avocado toast and tea in the early morning light with my mom was a prescription that I needed badly. To just have a break from school, to not have to worry about drama or essays or speeches to deal with.

Don't get me wrong, going to the beach would have been absolutely amazing — and a perfect idea for my sophomore year spring break. But freshman year, when we are all still new to the whole 'going out' and party scene, spring break is the "ultimate party." It almost felt like I had to go, like some high school pressure combined with fear of missing out. I had to remind myself that that kind of pressure didn't exist unless I made it so in my own head. And once I got past that, I had one of the best, most relaxing breaks ever.

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