These Are Unarguably The Greatest Quarterbacks Of All Time

These Are Unarguably The Greatest Quarterbacks Of All Time

Who's the GOAT?
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Many people have been called the greatest of all time, especially in sports, so debates always occur over who is really the greatest of all-time. Well, I am going to start the journey to figure out who is the greatest NFL player of all-time by going through every position (I may eventually go on the epic journey of figuring out the greatest athlete, but I'm not trying to bite off more than I can chew).

So, let's start with the most well-known position in football, the quarterback (QB).

I plan to keep the metrics simple for the QBs. I am going to look at three key areas of performance: Stats/Records, Awards, and Championships. So without any further ado, let's get into the top 10:

10. John Elway

Stats/Records:162 Wins (4th all-time), Sacked 516 times (2nd), 56.9% Completion (T-91st), 226 Passes Intercepted (15th), 51,475 Passing Yards (6th), 35 Comeback Wins (5th), and 300 Passing TDs (11th)

Awards: 9× Pro Bowl (1986, 1987, 1989, 1991, 1993, 1994, 1996–1998), First-team All-Pro (1987), 2× Second-team All-Pro (1993, 1996), NFL Most Valuable Player (1987), 2× AFC Offensive Player of the Year (1987, 1993), NFL 1990s All-Decade Team, NFL Hall of Fame, and Denver Broncos Ring of Fame

Championships: Five AFC Championships, Two Super Bowls (XXXII and XXXIII), and One Super Bowl MVP (XXXIII)

Elway was a great quarterback, to be in the Hall of Fame it is kinda required, but he did not do everything great. Elway struggled with accuracy, which shows in his completion percentage and passes intercepted, and is the main reason why it took him so long to win a Super Bowl. That said, Elway is still one of the best statistical quarterbacks all time, and played a huge roll in defining the modern QB that can run as well as pass.

9. Otto Graham

Stats/Records:114 Total Wins (13th all-time(61 NFL Wins(77th)), 55.8% Completion (T-112th), 135 Passes Intercepted (74th), 23,584 Passing Yards (84th), 10 Comeback Wins (T-112), and 174 Passing TDs (T-59th)
NFL Record for career average yards gained per pass attempt, with 9.0 and the record for the highest career winning percentage 81.4%

Awards: 5× Pro Bowl (1950–1954), 4× First-team All-Pro (1951, 1953–1955), Second-team All-Pro (1952), 3× NFL Most Valuable Player (1951, 1953, 1955), 3× First-team All-AAFC (1947–1949), 2× AAFC Most Valuable Player (1947, 1948), NFL Hall of Fame, NFL 1950s All-Decade Team, and NFL 75th Anniversary Team

Championships: Three NFL championships (1950, 1954, 1955) and Four AAFC Championships (1946-1949)

Otto Graham earns a place on this list for a few reasons, but the biggest one is that he won games. Graham is the winningest quarterback in history, so, despite the rest of his numbers not holding up, he warrants a place on the list. That said, his success in a less-talented era, combined with the number being nowhere near the modern stars, leaves him near the bottom though.

8. Aaron Rodgers

Stats/Records:103 Wins (18th all-time), Sacked 360 times (T-24th) 65.2% Completion (7th), 75 Passes Intercepted (164th), 38,212 Passing Yards (20th), 12 Comeback Wins (T-90), and 310 Passing TDs (10th) NFL Record career 104.0 passer rating, season 122.5 passer rating (2011), and career 4.13:1 touchdown-to-interception ratio

Awards: 2× NFL Most Valuable Player (2011, 2014), 6× Pro Bowl (2009, 2011, 2012, 2014–2016), 2× First-team All-Pro (2011, 2014), Second-team All-Pro (2012), Associated Press Athlete of the Year (2011), and Bert Bell Award (2011)

Championships: One NFC Championship, One Super Bowl (XLV), and One Super Bowl MVP (XLV)

Aaron Rodgers *in Stephen A. Smith's voice* is a bbbaaaaad maaaan. In all seriousness, Rodgers has the potential to top this list if he places the rest of his career at a top level, but with injuries and the possibility of some people playing longer than he will, Rodgers might not. The facts are this though, Rodgers is great, but #7 and the rest of the list have better numbers that best Rodgers, for now.

7. Drew Brees

Stats/Records:146 Wins (T-6th all-time), Sacked 373 times (T-9th) 66.9% Completion (1st), 225 Passes Intercepted (16th), 69,409 Passing Yards (3rd), 30 Comeback Wins (T-8th), and 482 Passing TDs (T-3rd) NFL Record 66.8 career completion percentage, 7 touchdown passes in a game (tied), and 54 consecutive games with a touchdown pass

Awards: 10× Pro Bowl (2004, 2006, 2008–2014, 2016), First-team All-Pro (2006), 3× Second-team All-Pro (2008, 2009, 2011), 2× NFL Offensive Player of the Year (2008, 2011), Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year (2010), Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year (2010), Bert Bell Award (2009), Walter Payton NFL Man of the Year (2006), NFL Comeback Player of the Year (2004)

Championships: One NFC Championship, One Super Bowl (XLIV), and One Super Bowl MVP (XLIV)

Brees has had an amazing career but is underrated in a sense. Some people would say he does not even belong on this list, let alone ahead of Rodgers, but his resume stacks up well against this whole list, and is a bit better than Rodgers. The thing that puts Brees over Rodgers is the fact that he has all the listed NFL records, but he has plenty that are also "Fastest or Youngest to do X," which Rodgers might take from him, but until Rodgers does it, Brees holds the #7 spot.

6. Dan Marino


Stats/Records:155 Wins (5th all-time), Sacked 270 times (58th) 59.4% Completion (T-50th), 252 Passes Intercepted (8th), 61,361 Passing Yards (5th), 36 Comeback Wins (T-3rd), and 420 Passing TDs (5th)

Awards: 9× Pro Bowl (1983–1987, 1991, 1992, 1994, 1995),3× First-team All-Pro (1984–1986), 4× Second-team All-Pro (1983, 1992, 1994, 1995), NFL Most Valuable Player (1984), NFL Offensive Player of the Year (1984), Walter Payton NFL Man of the Year (1998), NFL Rookie of the Year (1983), NFL Comeback Player of the Year (1994), NFL Hall of Fame, Miami Dolphins No. 13 retired, and Miami Dolphin Honor Roll

Championships: One AFC Championship

Marino is one of the greatest of all time... to never win a super bowl. All jokes aside, Marino was an amazing player, and the stats warrant the fifth spot on this list, not because of how many categories he finishes 5th in, but because he was that good. The fact that Marino never won a ring, combined with the fact that the majority of his records have been broken, leaves "Mr. Monday Night" sitting behind the guys he delivered every Sunday and Monday.

5. Brett Favre

Stats/Records:199 Wins (3rd all-time), Sacked 525 times (1st) 62.0% Completion (25th), 336 Passes Intercepted (1st), 71,838 Passing Yards (2nd), 30 Comeback Wins (T-8th), and 508 Passing TDs (2nd) NFL Record Most pass completions (6,300), Most pass attempts (10,169), Most pass interceptions (336), Most fumbles (166), and Most starts (298)

Awards: 11× Pro Bowl (1992, 1993, 1995–1997, 2001–2003, 2007–2009), 3× First-team All-Pro (1995–1997), 3× Second-team All-Pro (2001, 2002, 2007), 3× NFL Most Valuable Player (1995–1997), Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year (2007), NFL Offensive Player of the Year (1995), Green Bay Packers No. 4 retired, Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame, and NFL 1990s All-Decade Team

Championships: Five NFC Championships and One Super Bowl (XXXI)

Brett Favre retired from the game of pro football with the majority of records that a QB can hold, but not all of those records are good. Favre, for all of his greatness, was a gunslinger and a turnover machine, which at times was more detrimental to his teams than beneficial to them. Despite those faults, Brett Favre was the "Iron Man" with 298 starts, 297 of which were consecutive starts, also a record, one of which was a game the same day his father died, so I have nothing but respect for him and what he has done for football.

4. Johnny Unitas

Stats/Records:124 Wins (10th all-time), 54.6% Completion (T-129th), 253 Passes Intercepted (7th), 40,239 Passing Yards (19th), 36 Comeback Wins (T-3rd), and 290 Passing TDs (14th) NFL Record Three Bert Bell Awards (Tied with Peyton Manning and Randall Cunningham)

Awards: 10× Pro Bowl (1957–1964, 1966, 1967), 5× First-team All-Pro (1958, 1959, 1964, 1965, 1967), 2× Second-team All-Pro (1957, 1963), 3× AP NFL Most Valuable Player (1959, 1964, 1967), 3× Bert Bell Award (1959, 1964, 1967), NFL Man of the Year (1970), NFL Hall of Fame, NFL 75th Anniversary All-Time Team, NFL 1960s All-Decade Team, and Indianapolis Colts No. 19 retired

Championships: Three NFL Championships (1958, 1959, and 1968) and One Super Bowl (V)

Johnny Unitas was the greatest quarterback of all time when he retired, and he had just about every record to prove it. As time has gone past, other quarterbacks have followed and surpassed what he has accomplished, but he changed the game of football so much that his contribution cannot be ignored. Unitas and his team were one half of the "greatest game ever played" back in 1958, which is cited by many as the game that made football mainstream, but that still isn't enough to beat out those ahead of him, since they can match his merits.

3. Peyton Manning

Stats/Records:200 Wins (2nd all-time), Sacked 303 times (47th) 65.3% Completion (T-5th), 251 Passes Intercepted (9th), 71,940 Passing Yards (1st), 45 Comeback Wins (1st), and 539 Passing TDs (1st) NFL Record 71,940 passing yards, career, 5,477 passing yards, season, 539 passing touchdowns, career, 55 passing touchdowns, season, 7 touchdown passes in a game (tied), and many more

Awards: 14× Pro Bowl (1999, 2000, 2002–2010, 2012–2014), 7× First-team All-Pro (2003–2005, 2008, 2009, 2012, 2013), 3× Second-team All-Pro (1999, 2000, 2006), 5× NFL MVP (2003, 2004, 2008, 2009, 2013), 3× Bert Bell Award (2003, 2004, 2013), 2× NFL Offensive Player of the Year (2004, 2013), Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year (2013), NFL Comeback Player of the Year (2012), NFL 2000s All-Decade Team, and Indianapolis Colts No. 18 retired

Championships: Four AFC Championships, Two Super Bowls (XLI and 50), and One Super Bowl MVP (XLI)

Peyton Manning is one of three players to win three Bert Bell awards, along with Unitas and Cunningham, and the only five-time MVP. Manning has a ridiculous amount of records, but he is only number three on this list. This is because all of Manning's records can be broken by people in this list, and he did not have the postseason success that a few others have had.

2. Joe Montana

Stats/Records:133 Wins (8th all-time), Sacked 313 times (T-31st) 63.2% Completion (15th), 139 Passes Intercepted (68th), 40,551 Passing Yards (18th), 31 Comeback Wins (T-6th), and 273 Passing TDs (16th) NFL Postseason Records for pass attempts (122) without throwing an interception and most games with a passer rating over 100.0 (12)

Awards: 8× Pro Bowl (1981, 1983–1985, 1987, 1989, 1990, 1993), 3× First-team All-Pro (1987, 1989, 1990), 2× Second-team All-Pro (1981, 1984), 2× NFL Most Valuable Player (1989, 1990), NFL Offensive Player of the Year (1989), Bert Bell Award (1989), Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year (1990), 2× AP Athlete of the Year (1989, 1990), NFL Comeback Player of the Year (1986), NFL Hall of Fame, NFL 1980s All-Decade Team, NFL 75th Anniversary All-Time Team, and San Francisco 49ers No. 16 retired

Championships: Four NFC Championships, Four Super Bowls (XVI, XIX, XXIII and XXIV), and Three Super Bowl MVP (XVI, XIX, and XXIV)

Joe Montana may not have had the total stats to go head-to-head with Peyton Manning, but when the playoffs came around, Montana was in a league of his own. Montana seemed to always find a way to deliver in the biggest moments, and it has led to him being considered among the greatest of all-time. His regular season success keeps him from getting the top spot, however, because football is not just a regular season or a postseason, but both.

Before we get to the #1 spot, here are a few honorable mentions:

Russel Wilson - This year has shown just how good Wilson can be, but until he does it consistently and gets the records some of the people who made the list have, he sits as an honorable mention.

Roger Staubach - As a Cowboy's fan, I really wanted to justify putting Staubach on the list, but the overall success is not there.

Randall Cunningham - The best true dual-threat quarterback of all-time, Cunningham misses the list because he did not put up the numbers as pure QB to earn a spot, but in terms of pure athletic ability, he could be in the top 5.

Now for the number one spot...

1. Baker Mayfield

Stats/Records: One TRAITOR Shirt, One flag planting, One "Who's Your Daddy," One "Stick to Basketball," Two sets of fake tears. Three FUs to KU, and One crotch-grab.

Awards: Future Heisman, the Cockiest man alive, and the most polarizing athlete of all-time

Championships: All of them including the People's Championship

Baker Mayfield is a straight baller. The kid knows how to perform on the grandest stage, and his earned his G.O.A.T. status. Don't disrespect the greatness of Baker Mayfield by assuming anyone else could top this list, and I am laughing while writing this some I am just going to stop.

In all seriousness:

1. Tom Brady

Stats/Records: 218 Wins (1st all-time), Sacked 444 times (9th) 64.0% Completion (T-12th), 156 Passes Intercepted (57th), 65,214 Passing Yards (4th), 40 Comeback Wins (2nd), and 482 Passing TDs (T-3rd) NFL Record Best touchdown to interception ratio in a season (28:2), Most wins on the road by a quarterback (85), NFL Playoff Record Most games started by a quarterback (34), Most games won by a starting quarterback (25), Most touchdown passes (63), Most passing yards (9,094), Most passes completed (831), Most passes attempted (1,325), and the Super Bowl version of the previous four records.

Awards: 12× Pro Bowl (2001, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2009–2016), 2× First-team All-Pro (2007, 2010), 2× Second-team All-Pro (2005, 2016), 2× NFL Most Valuable Player (2007, 2010), 2× NFL Offensive Player of the Year (2007, 2010), NFL Comeback Player of the Year (2009), Bert Bell Award (2007), Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year (2007), Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year (2005), and NFL 2000s All-Decade Team

Championships: Seven AFC Championships, Five Super Bowls (XXXVI, XXXVIII, XXXIX, XLIX, and LI), and Four Super Bowl MVPs (XXXVI, XXXVIII, XXIX, and LI)

Of course it was going to be Tom Brady at the top of this list. Peyton Manning might be the best regular season quarterback of all-time, Joe Montana might be the best postseason quarterback of all-time, but Brady has numbers to compete with both of them in their respective domains. Tom Brady, just like Madden 18 said, is the G.O.A.T.


All data was pulled from profootballreference.com, NFL.com, and Profootballhof.com

Cover Image Credit: Twitter

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11 Things Fastpitch Softball Players Know To Be True

You'll never remember your Facebook password, but you'll remember softball cheers for the rest of your life.
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There comes a time in every little girl's life when she must come to terms with the fact that she will never play Major League Baseball. So, she turns to softball. From tee-ball to coach-pitch to travel ball, to playing on your school team, softball has played a crucial role in your life. It taught you the value of teamwork, the importance of sunscreen, and introduced you to your best friends. For former and current fastpitch players alike, these truths are universal.

1. The rays of a thousand suns couldn't even out your tan lines.

Tan arms and a V-neck tan line is the unofficial uniform of the softball player. Years after you stop playing softball, at 2 p.m. on the second Monday of every month when the sun is shining through your bathroom window at a 90-degree angle, you'll swear you can still see the slightest hint of a racerback tan line between your shoulders. Good luck finding a flattering sundress!

2. Pitchers are a different breed of human.

It's a tale as old as time: You saw that the pitchers got to skip all of the intense drills at practice so they can go off to the side with the catcher to chat and have a catch for an hour and you said, "I gotta get in on that." So, your dad paid for your pitching lessons, you mimicked Jennie Finch as best as you could, and three years later, you're contemplating changing your name just to forget about that time you spent as a pitcher. Successful pitchers must have no other interests, future career goals, or a family who loves them because pitching just destroys everything you believe in. If you do survive being a pitcher, congratulations, because you are now fully equipped with nerves of steel that will allow you to conquer the worst that life has to throw at you.

3. An 8 a.m. game on Sunday means you had a really bad Saturday.

Where is the most tranquil and somber place that people often go to on Sunday mornings to reflect on their wrongdoings? No, not church. It's the softball field. When you have to be at the field before the sun, you start thinking irrationally, like "Maybe if I used the Demarini instead of the Stealth in the third inning of the second game yesterday we would've only lost by six runs instead of seven which would have put us in the winner's bracket!" Have fun running a lap for every error you made the day before.

4. If the other team is wearing shorts, you know you're going to win.

There's just so much leg! Shorts and softball go together like ketchup and strawberry jelly, as in, that's what your knees are going to look like if you even attempt to slide wearing a pair of shorts. Don't even get me started on the tan line from mid thigh to mid shin. You know the one. This is the big leagues, ladies, put on some pants.

5. If you aren't dirty after a game, you didn't play hard enough.

If you don't come home from a tournament, look in the mirror, and go, "Wow I got a good tan today!" only to take a shower and find out that it was all just dirt, then you probably missed that slide sign from the third base coach when you were rounding second.

6. Cheers are a necessary evil.

Cheering in softball is like having a dead-end job that you hate; it's unfulfilling, robs you of your dignity, and tires you out, but you have to do it anyway. You'll never remember your Facebook password, your parents' anniversary, or that you left your laundry in the washer, but you'll remember softball cheers for the rest of your life. Unless, of course, you fall into the water and bump your little head like that damn froggy.

7. Pre-wrap is a hot commodity in the dugout.

"I'll trade you a bag of Ranch sunflower seeds for your light blue pre wrap."

"No way, I had to get my mom to drive me to three different Sports Authority's last night just to find this color!"

8. You may get along with other teams between games, but they are not your friends on the field.

It's perfectly normal to meet another player in line for the bathroom at a tournament, compliment her on her cheetah print hair ribbon, and then trash talk her on the field half an hour later. You can make it up to her by giving her a high five and a poignant smile in the handshake line after the game.

9. If you get hit by a pitch and there aren't lace marks in your skin, it's really just a waste of time.

You love being able to showcase your bruises at school on Monday when all of your non-softball friends ask, "Does it hurt to get hit with a fastball?" and you can coolly and calmly answer, "Nah." Bruises up your street cred, and lace marks are just bonus points. So, when you don't have any stitching embedded in your skin, you wish you could just have the chance to bat. Take your base.

10. When the bat meets the ball juuuuuust right, it is the most powerful feeling in the world.

Your dad was right when he told you to keep your head down when you swing. You always thought that the "sweet spot" of the bat was just a myth until you hit your first home run. The rush of adrenaline will make you feel so powerful that you'll try to see if you can pick up a car in the parking lot with your bare hands after the game, but you still can't.

11. You will always consider your team to be your best friends.

After spending every weekend together, you and your team create a bond so close that it borders on uncomfortable. You may take out your frustrations on each other from time to time like when someone steps on the freshly chalked line before the game, or when you all fight over the ball with the best, most prominent laces for your warm up toss. But at the end of the day, your team will always be the biggest bunch of weirdos you know, and that is irreplaceable.

Cover Image Credit: Art Mad

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Andy Ruiz Jr. May Not Look Like The Typical Boxer, But It Doesn't Make His Victory Any Less Deserved

Andy Ruiz Jr. just proved that dreams can come true.

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On June 1, boxing fans witnessed something special as Andy 'Destroyer' Ruiz Jr. defeated Anthony Joshua via TKO after going seven rounds in the ring at Madison Square Garden in New York City to become the first ever Mexican-American heavyweight champion of the world. Ruiz Jr. (33-1) was a heavy underdog (+1100) heading into the match-up with Joshua (22-1) but ultimately flipped the script to hand the British fighter his first professional loss ever. Surely the fight will go down as one of the greatest moments in sports history.

Some members of the media and fans have been quick to label the fight as a 'fluke' and 'rigged' which in the end is no surprise to me. That always happens in the sports world. Many did not believe we would get this result yet failed to remember the one rule of sports -- expect the unexpected. Over the past week, I've been coming to the defense of Ruiz Jr. in the wake of others choosing to call him a joke.

I was shocked and surprised to hear two of my favorite sports analysts, Stephen A. Smith and Shannon Sharpe, make fun of Ruiz Jr. and frame him as just a guy that looked like 'Butterbean.' When I viewed their tweets on social media it honestly made me upset. Sure, Ruiz Jr. may not have fit the mold of what a professional boxer should look like, but they simply should not have just judged a book by its cover.

Personally, I thought it was disrespectful for Smith and Sharpe to throw shade at Ruiz Jr. in the way they did. I felt like they should have done a better job of acknowledging the winner considering the result of the match. Yet choosing to bash someone because of their physical composition appeared like a low blow. The very foundation of sports allows people of all shapes, sizes, genders, races, and backgrounds to compete -- that's why most people follow them in the first place.

Smith was open behind his reasoning for his tweets in which I'd like to shed some light on. Smith was upset about how boxing time after time contains elements of corruption with fans having to wait years until promoters schedule big fights. He along with other followers of the sport were looking forward to the highly anticipated yet potential future match-up between Joshua and fellow heavyweight Deontay Wilder. Smith believes that by Ruiz Jr. beating Joshua it essentially diminished the chances of that fight ever happening with the same amount of buildup, but that still doesn't provide any excuse for mocking the new heavyweight champ.

Ruiz Jr. was there for a reason and ultimately seized the opportunity that was right in front of him -- that's not his fault for getting the job done. Just because someone doesn't look like the part doesn't mean they don't possess the same qualities and characteristics as their counterparts. The following pair of videos display the amount of talent Ruiz Jr. does have in the ring. Even fellow boxer Canelo Alvarez and former UFC lightweight/featherweight champion Conor McGregor acknowledge that and have come out to say something on their behalf.

Unfortunately, I don't expect much to change because most will stand their ground and continue to behave the same way. All I'm saying is I did not enjoy some of the top figures within sports media stereotyping Ruiz Jr. based on his looks. I would think that we would be better than that and recognize that anyone can accomplish something great in this world. It all just starts with a simple dream.

I understand and respect other people's takes on this subject, maybe I'm looking into things deeper than what they are, but it struck a chord with me and I felt the need to say something about it.

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