'That PNW Bridge' Is No More

'That PNW Bridge' Is No More

#RIPVanceCreekBridge
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Vance Creek Viaduct is a well-known Pacific Northwest icon, despite the fact that it is owned by a private logging company and is forbidden to visit. As the second tallest railway arch and one of the tallest bridges built in the United States, “That PNW Bridge” is 347 feet high and over 800 feet in length and has been a photography hotspot for those who have dared to pass the neon orange “No Trespassing” signs and trudge across creeks, hills and cut down trees blocking the gravel trail to take in a view of the northwest so high into in the air.

Mason County is well known for its logging history as well as this railway bridge, which sits near Olympic National Park in the middle of logging property. Before its boom of popularity in 2012, due to Instagram posts giving away its location, the bridge was only known by the locals who mostly respected the property and kept it secret to the general public. The amount of annual visitors grew exponentially after “insta-famous” photographers posted pictures and revealed its location. Soon, people came from all over the world to capture the perfect photo, and along with that came more vandalism and destruction of the property.

The events which caused the bridge to close to the public involved vandalization, as well as a person who found themself stuck after climbing the substructures beneath the bridge. Hanging one’s feet off of the sides of the ties and on the edge of the bridge became a popular and dangerous activity as well. The private company decided to close the property by posting up signs and hiring guards to turn people around as a result. They hoped that this would draw people away from the viaduct.

It didn’t.

Still, years later, people have traveled from all over the country to find the hidden gem of the Pacific Northwest. They would risk having their cars towed and paying hefty fines to capture a moment before the bridge was gone for good.

At the end of this August, the private logging company decided to dismantle the railway ties due to people continuing to trespass and vandalize the property. Fires were started on the bridge by reckless people, graffiti litters the tresses, and garbage was left carelessly on the property.

I understand why the bridge was dismantled- the company wanted to avoid potential lawsuits. However, I cannot help but see this event as a greatly missed opportunity. Instead of destroying a piece of history, why not give the property to the national park that starts just a few miles away? The landmark would be a potential gold mine for tourism. Sure, it would cost money to preserve and make the bridge safe enough for the public, but as someone who has seen the place in person, I can’t help but be extremely disappointed.

Cover Image Credit: Helana Michelle

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Sorry Not Sorry, My Parents Paid For My Coachella Trip

No haters are going to bring me down.
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With Coachella officially over, lives can go back to normal and we can all relive Beyonce’s performance online for years to come. Or, if you were like me and actually there, you can replay the experience in your mind for the rest of your life, holding dear to the memories of an epic weekend and a cultural experience like no other on the planet.

And I want to be clear about the Beyonce show: it really was that good.

But with any big event beloved by many, there will always be the haters on the other side. The #nochella’s, the haters of all things ‘Chella fashion. And let me just say this, the flower headbands aren’t cultural appropriation, they’re simply items of clothing used to express the stylistic tendency of a fashion-forward event.

Because yes, the music, and sure, the art, but so much of what Coachella is, really, is about the fashion and what you and your friends are wearing. It's supposed to be fun, not political! Anyway, back to the main point of this.

One of the biggest things people love to hate on about Coachella is the fact that many of the attendees have their tickets bought for them by their parents.

Sorry? It’s not my fault that my parents have enough money to buy their daughter and her friends the gift of going to one of the most amazing melting pots of all things weird and beautiful. It’s not my fault about your life, and it’s none of your business about mine.

All my life, I’ve dealt with people commenting on me, mostly liking, but there are always a few that seem upset about the way I live my life.

One time, I was riding my dolphin out in Turks and Cacaos, (“riding” is the act of holding onto their fin as they swim and you sort of glide next to them. It’s a beautiful, transformative experience between human and animal and I really think, when I looked in my dolphin’s eye, that we made a connection that will last forever) and someone I knew threw shade my way for getting to do it.

Don’t make me be the bad guy.

I felt shame for years after my 16th birthday, where my parents got me an Escalade. People at school made fun of me (especially after I drove into a ditch...oops!) and said I didn’t deserve the things I got in life.

I can think of a lot of people who probably don't deserve the things in life that they get, but you don't hear me hating on them (that's why we vote, people). Well, I’m sick of being made to feel guilty about the luxuries I’m given, because they’ve made me who I am, and I love me.

I’m a good person.

I’m not going to let the Coachella haters bring me down anymore. Did my parents buy my ticket and VIP housing? Yes. Am I sorry about that? Absolutely not.

Sorry, not sorry!

Cover Image Credit: Kaycie Allen

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11 Signs You Can't Wait To Jet Your Way Out Of The U.S. For Your Study Abroad

So you've been accepted to study abroad, now what? You spend so much of your time thinking about it. Obviously.
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No matter where you are studying abroad, and even if you have been abroad before, it is one of the most exciting things to happen in college.

So you've been accepted to study abroad, now what? You spend so much of your time thinking about it. Obviously. Which ones of these pre-departure study abroad side effects are you?

1. You've begun to plan all the cute photos you are going to take

2. You're actually excited to take your passport photo

3. Your YouTube history is full of travel vlogs

4. All your savings are for study abroad

5. You're pinning all kinds of travel tips on Pinterest

6. Even suitcase shopping seems exciting

7. Buying your plane tickets is your idea of good procrastination

8. Everyone's travel photos are giving you serious wanderlust x 1000.

9. You're following accounts and hashtags on Instagram about your destination.

10. All you can think about during exams is study abroad.

11. Everywhere you go, you talk about studying abroad.

Cover Image Credit: Video Disney

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