The Best Place To Hide During The Solar Eclipse Of 2017

The Best Place To Hide During The Solar Eclipse Of 2017

Kosmikophobia is real. Chicken Little was right. The sky is falling.
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With all the political unrest, bizarre world events, climate upheaval, and more, the idea of a solar eclipse in August is more than enough to send me into a whirlwind of fear. Before you dismiss my distress over the upcoming comic phenomenon, hear me out. I have personal as well as historical data to validate my reasoning.

Let me begin with being raised by my neurotic grandmother. I don’t have time to go into all of her peculiarity, but I will tell you about her religious views regarding the end of the world. She was a firm believer in the apocalyptic visions from the Bible. She was a harbinger of signs that would mark the final days of our human existence. She often explained that the moon would turn red and trumpets would sound when the cataclysmic end was near. I had a traumatic childhood, so hearing these things would heighten my anxiety and fear. I still get a bit nervous if I hear a loud train horn during a full moon.

Even as an adult, I still carry suppressed fears of eclipses, comets, asteroids and other cosmic events. I try not read anything that involves meteor showers or humans sending laser signals to the moon (the laser signals may cause the gravitational pull to get off kilter and send the moon spinning off into the earth). Kosmikophobia is the name for this type of what some consider irrational fear.

In case you think I am alone in this phobic state, I have more evidence that will prove differently. A pastor by the name of John Hagee wrote a book “Four Blood Moons” which, in March of 2014, was the country's ninth best-selling paperback. It seems there were four blood moons (lunar eclipses) in six-month intervals. The book claims that this is an omen marking the end of the world. They use this Bible verse to prove their point. Acts 2:20: “The sun will be turned to darkness and the moon to blood before the coming of the great and glorious day of the Lord.” OK, so the last one of these events took place on September 28, 2015 and we are still here on the planet. Just keep in mind that they didn’t give a specific date for the end.

There are people around the world who believe that a solar eclipse is a bad omen. Some say pregnant women should stay inside during a solar eclipse. Others believe food cooked during a solar eclipse might become poisonous. Erratic behavior is believed to increase during eclipses. Some blame health issues on solar eclipses. On the other hand, those who follow astrology might claim good fortune or romantic interests are heightened during these times. I don’t think I want to risk a romantic involvement either. I don’t have great success in that area. One fact I discovered is that birds stop singing during an eclipse. How anything good come from birds not singing? It has been reported that power outages might occur, but they think it will be limited to Europe-maybe.

My closest friends know about my unique fears. Of course, now anyone who reads my post will know as well. I hope you don’t think differently about me after learning of my kosmikophobia. NASA has assured us that we are safe and have no need to worry. We should all just grab the glasses (mandatory for viewing so you don’t damage your eyes) and enjoy the spectacle.

I would prefer to stay indoors and pretend it is a very dark, overcast day on August 21, 2017 (the day after my birthday) during the solar eclipse. I would close the blinds, shut the curtains, grab salty and sweet snacks and binge on Netflix movies. I won’t be able to do that because I will be on campus this year. It is the day of the new student convocation and other events. Solar glasses will be distributed free those on campus, but I think I will find a secluded place in the library and drink Starbucks tea. Starbucks is the closest cosmic event I plan to view. As long as the power doesn't go out, that is.

Cover Image Credit: Metro.co.uk Gallo Gallina

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5 Perks Of Having A Long-Distance Best Friend

The best kind of long-distance relationship.
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Sometimes, people get annoyed when girls refer to multiple people as their "best friend," but they don't understand. We have different types of best friends. There's the going out together best friend, the see each other everyday best friend and the constant, low maintenance best friend.

While I'm lucky enough to have two out of the three at the same school as me, my "low maintenance" best friend goes to college six hours from Baton Rouge.

This type of friend is special because no matter how long you go without talking or seeing each other, you're always insanely close. Even though I miss her daily, having a long-distance best friend has its perks. Here are just a few of them...

1. Getting to see each other is a special event.

Sometimes when you see someone all the time, you take that person and their friendship for granted. When you don't get to see one of your favorite people very often, the times when you're together are truly appreciated.

2. You always have someone to give unbiased advice.

This person knows you best, but they probably don't know the people you're telling them about, so they can give you better advice than anyone else.

3. You always have someone to text and FaceTime.

While there may be hundreds of miles between you, they're also just a phone call away. You know they'll always be there for you even when they can't physically be there.

4. You can plan fun trips to visit each other.

When you can visit each other, you get to meet the people you've heard so much about and experience all the places they love. You get to have your own college experience and, sometimes, theirs, too.

5. You know they will always be a part of your life.

If you can survive going to school in different states, you've both proven that your friendship will last forever. You both care enough to make time for the other in the midst of exams, social events, and homework.

The long-distance best friend is a forever friend. While I wish I could see mine more, I wouldn't trade her for anything.

Cover Image Credit: Just For Laughs-Chicago

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14 Things I Did This Season To Cope With My Seasonal Affective Disorder

SAD is a real thing.

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Seasonal Affective Disorder affects many people. I promise it is a real thing. The Mayo Clinic defines SAD as "A mood disorder characterized by depression that occurs at the same time every year." Mine comes in the dead of winter. So this winter, I wrote down a couple of things that made me feel better.

1. Take a hot shower/bath

All the steam in the bathroom and the heat from the water soothes the soul for real.

2. Get out of bed 

Try and wake up earlier than usual.

3. Buy a happy lamp

They mimic sunlight but without the UV rays.

https://verilux.com/collections/happylight-therapy-lamps-boxes

4. Make your bed everyday

One small accomplishment everyday.

5. Sit in your living room as opposed to your bed room

6. Eat healthier 

7. Do one small thing for yourself everyday

Get a cup of coffee or go for a walk.

8. Exercise 

I hate it as much as the next person but it does help.

9. Go out with friends 

I know sitting at home may be ideal but it's nice to be surrounded by people who love you.

10. When you're sad, let yourself be sad

Cry, listen to sad music, do what you gotta do.

11. Ask for help

Let people know what you're going through. It's ok.

12. Take care of yourself

Put on a facemask. Paint your nails.

13. Write about it

14. Try and plan a trip to a warm place with sun

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