How Technology Has Taken Over Our Lives

How Technology Has Taken Over Our Lives

The Zombie Apocalypse May Not Be How You Originally Envisioned
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We have all heard it, how technology has taken over the world and left us as zombies. We are shells of who we may have been, because instead of looking around and experiencing life we are dependent upon a lit up screen. We have all heard this, but what does this dependency really mean for our future?

We are lacking socialization; instead of talking to and spending time with other people, we are getting all our information from the Internet. The Internet is an amazing resource, but there are some things it cannot teach or give you. It cannot teach you the value of spending time with friends and family, or how to live life to the fullest by being present in the current moment. You never know just how many opportunities and experiences pass you by because you are looking down at your screen. When you are 90, you aren’t going to look back fondly at the countless hours you spent watching cat videos.

With technology being such an integral part of our lives now, no one is spared, not even babies. They are given iPhones/tablets to grab and play with instead of toys. Instead of being sent outside to play, children are given iPads to watch videos or are playing video games. Each generation is becoming more and more dependent, and no longer sustain skills that were once deemed necessary. Many middle school kids no longer know how to write or read cursive or how to set up a written letter. Their attention spans are getting briefer and more sporadic, unable to be attentive to a teacher for long spans of time. If the homework is not on the computer, how do they do it? Gradually this will carry on into the work world, and once-simple tasks will become a chore.

We now live in a world where it is possible to talk instantly with someone on the other end of the Earth. This instant communication is convenient and helpful, however it creates a reality where the conversation never really ends. Countless texts are sent back and forth 24/7, and conversations lose their meaning. People run out of things to say and become redundant. Relationships become even harder, because even couples need time away from each other. Technology makes this difficult to do because, even if we are not currently talking with the other person, it is not hard to go on social media and see every detail of what the other is doing. We post our entire lives online, and yet still expect the significant other to have something new to say at the end of the day.

Talking to someone on the phone or face to face has become harder. We are so used to speaking in messages to people behind a screen that we cannot see that talking in real time to someone right in front of us becomes nerve racking. We have lost social skills, manners, and expect everything to be delivered to us as fast as the Internet does.

We are constantly distracted. We try to multitask at all times, having conversations with people while looking down at our phones, writing emails while in a lecture, and even texting and driving. It has gotten to the point where our multitasking is dangerous. Just because we can multitask, or think we can, does not mean that we should. Take the time to fully immerse yourself in the moment and listen to your friend when they talk to you, give the teacher your full attention, and perhaps most importantly, pay attention to the road. When we multitask we are not fully engaging with what is going on around us, and so we are not doing the best job that we could.

We are all so distracted by our phones that we have not fully noticed the zombie apocalypse that is happening right in front of us. Technology is a beautiful thing, but if we cannot learn how to use it responsibly and in moderation, our future may not be as bright as the screens we are holding.

Cover Image Credit: http://wearelovely.com/symptoms-of-a-zombie-apocalypse/

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10 Shows Netflix Should Have Acquired INSTEAD of Re-newing 'Friends' For $100 Million

Could $100 Million BE anymore of an overspend?

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Netflix broke everyone's heart and then stitched them back together within a matter of 12 hours the other day.

How does one do that you may wonder. Well they start by announcing that as of January 1st, 2019 'Friends' will no longer be available to stream. This then caused an uproar from the ones who watch 'Friends' at least once a day, myself including. Because of this giant up roar, with some threats to leave Netflix all together, they announced that 'Friends' will still be available for all of 2019. So after they renewed our hope in life, they released that it cost them $100 million.

$100 million is a lot of money, money that could be spent on variety of different shows.

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Things I Should Have Already Said To My Mom And Dad

"You are stronger than you think" — My mom

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I told myself that when I moved to Auburn for my freshman year of college that I would be fine, that I would be OK without my parents over my shoulder all the time and that I could handle myself. Within the first week, I must have called my mom at least once a day every day for the simplest of things. I missed their faces and could hear their voices in my head when I made the smallest of decisions.

Now, it is the end of my first semester and though I call them a lot less, I miss them a lot more.

Some people wouldn't understand. They don't have the relationship with their parents that I have with mine. It's a love-hate thing. I love to annoy them and they say they hate it, but secretly wait for my texts and calls. They're there for me when I need the smallest of things and I don't think I've ever been more aware of just how much they support me, provide for me, and care for me. There have been many things that I've meant to say over the years that I never quite figured out how.

So this one's for them.

Dear Dad,

Throughout the last seven years, you have been giving me so much advice it could fill a book. We've had hundreds of arguments but in the end, we were still fine. You've taught me a lot of things but the most important is that failure is not an option. I remind myself every day and sometimes I have to remind my friends. It drives me to always do my best. So I know you're not used to hearing me say it, but thank you and I am grateful for all the drama that we've been through.

Dear Mom,

You continue to take care of me even though I annoy you beyond anyone you've ever known. You are the one I've always looked up to, the person I strive to be like and the person I'll always turn to for advice when it really matters. We've seen the dark side of each other and you know me better than anyone else in the world. I'm proud of you and all the things you've accomplished in life and hope that someday I can come close. I know parents always want their kids to do better than they did themselves, but if I end up like you, I think I'd be happy in life.

To Them Both,

Thank you means so little when compared to the countless things I've put you through and the things you've done for me. You have let me evolve into this semi-adult version of myself that I am today and I couldn't be happier. I'm sorry I don't come home often and call less, but I am trying to do better for myself, or at least the best I can. It's difficult at times and I hope you know I don't mean to hurt any feelings, ignore any texts or not call back. Some things are hard to keep up with, and some things I have to do on my own.

I love you both, and I'll be home soon.

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