The Best App For College Students Who Just Can't Use Agendas

The Best App For College Students Who Just Can't Use Agendas

This app is a guaranteed life saver when it comes to all things college.
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Every single college student should have this app and I am telling you because it is a total lifesaver. It's called the iStudiez Pro App and it basically is an agenda and grade saver, all in one.

As college students, we are constantly bombarded with a million things to do and not enough time to do them. When you're sitting in class thinking "I totally forgot about that...," this app will never let you forget, as it literally reminds you when class even is, when a test is, and what is due.

For me, personally, I utilized this app on a daily basis as it was so easy since it is right in my phone and kept me on track throughout the week of what assignments needed finishing right away, compared to the other ones that I could start at a later date over the weekend.

Breaking it down, you input your schedule for over the semester; that way it knows when your classes are. And I'm sure there are the college students who have their highlighters and post-its all over their agenda with color coordinated assignments. Then there are the rest of us, like me, who write it in their agenda, but don't keep a too watchful eye on it and half the time is just following along with the syllabus.

iStudiez Pro App helps in this case because it lets you mark something as "high priority," "normal," and "low priority." So if you had a major project you could mark it as high, whereas maybe there were a couple of discussion questions which you can mark as low. This helps in the organization.

On top of it, once you receive a grade back, you can put it in where you marked the assignment as completed and it helps keep track of all of your grades for the semester so when it comes down to knowing your final grade, you at least have an idea of what you'll be receiving. You can put it all your exam dates with the location/time in as well, which, during midterms and finals, was a complete lifesaver.

This is an app to be taken advantage of since it is so helpful. You're also able to put in calendar dates, like if you don't have school for a week for spring break or if you don't have school for the month of January, so it helps to know when you're on vacation or if your teacher canceled class one day for some reason.

Another awesome feature this app has is that it lets you put in all the courses, professors, and contact information that you may need for them and you can e-mail right off the app to them. This comes in handy when TAs, who may not have been included on the syllabus, give their information.

If you want to better your organization and have something that you can put everything school-related to in, I definitely recommend using the iStudiez Pro App. This was my first semester at Stony Brook and I basically had a time frame of when everything was due just by looking at the calendar, which is incredibly helpful.

If you're bad at staying on top of your life just like I am, download it!

Cover Image Credit: Pexels

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Why You Actually Don't Want To Be Prescribed Adderall

ADD isn't all that it's cracked up to be.
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As I'm writing this, I can feel my concentration slipping. Noises have become enticing, I feel distanced from my phone, and every time someone walks by me in the library, I turn around seeing if it's someone I know. My extended-release Adderall is starting to wear off and my brain is starting to relax back to its natural state. My ADD is climbing out from underneath the blanket of focus I had for 10 hours today.

ADD is not all that it's cracked up to be. Sure, we get prescribed the precious Adderall so many people want, but at what cost? Let me put this in context for you. You know when you're at the library and there's a one really, really loud girl talking on the phone? You know the one. The girl that, for some reason, thinks it's OK to have a full-fledged conversation with her mom about her boyfriend in the middle of the quiet section. The girl that's talking so loud that it's all you can think about, occupying all of your focus. Well, that's what every single person in the room is like when you have ADD.

Distractions that are easy to ignore to someone without ADD are intensified and, instead of focusing on the task at hand, I'm listening to the girl three seats down from me eat her barbecue kettle chips. When you have ADD, it's not just schoolwork you can't focus on. You can't focus on anything. I tried to watch a foreign film one time without my medicine, and I forgot to pay attention to the subtitles. I realized about halfway through the movie that I had no idea what was going on.

What almost everyone that asks me for my Adderall doesn't understand is that I take Adderall to focus how you would normally. When you take my Adderall you feel like you can solve the world's problems. You can bang out an entire project in one night. You can cram for an entire exam fueled by this surge of motivation that seems super-hero-like.

You take my Adderall and ask me, “Is this how you feel all the time?" And, unfortunately, my answer is no. I'll never feel like a limitless mastermind. When I take Adderall, I become a normal human being. I can finish a normal amount of work, in a normal amount of time.

My brain works in two modes: on Adderall, and off Adderall. On Adderall, I'm attentive, motivated and energetic. Off Adderall, I can barely get up the motivation and focus to clean my room or send an email. And it's frustrating. I'm frustrated with my lack of drive. I'm frustrated that this is how my brain operates. Scattered, spastic and very, very unorganized. There's nothing desirable about not being able to finish a sentence because you lost thought mid-way through.

The worst thing that you can say to anyone with ADD is, “I think I should start taking Adderall." Having ADD isn't a free pass to get super-pills, having ADD means you have a disability. I take Adderall because I have a disability, and it wasn't a choice I had a say in. I was tested for ADD my freshman year of college.

My parents were skeptical because they didn't know exactly what ADD was. To them, the kids with ADD were the bad kids in school that caused a scene and were constantly sent out of class. Not an above average student in her first year at a university. I went to a counselor and, after I was diagnosed with ADD, told me with a straight mouth, “Marissa this is something you're going to have to take for the rest of your life."

When the late-night assignments and cramming for the tests are over, and we're all out in the real world, I'm still going to be taking Adderall. When I'm raising a family and have to take the right kid to the right place for soccer practice, I'm still going be taking Adderall. And when I'm trying to remember the numbers they just said for bingo at my nursing home, I'm still going to be taking Adderall.

So you tell me you're jealous that I get prescribed Adderall? Don't be. I'm jealous that you can drink a cup a coffee and motivate yourself once you lose focus. I'm jealous that the success of your day doesn't depend on whether or not you took a pill that morning. The idea of waking up and performing a full day without my medicine is foreign to me.

My brain works in two modes, and I don't know which one is the right one. I don't know which mode is the one the big man upstairs wants me to operate in. So before you say you want to be prescribed to Adderall, ask yourself if you need and want to operate in two different modes.

Ask yourself if you want to rely on medicine to make your entire life work. If I had a choice, I would choose coffee like the rest of the world.

Cover Image Credit: Flickr

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10 Ways English Majors Are Figuratively, NOT Literally, Ted Mosby

To write or to read, that is the question all English majors must face when working on homework.

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Rather you're an English major or lit major or a writing major, there are a few things that we all have in common. And if you watched "How I Met Your Mother," you probably related to Ted Mosby more than you wished to.

1. Restraining yourself for correct people's text

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It's you're not your and it irritates me to no end.

2. Not understanding the difference between an English major and an English writing or English literature major

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My friend from another school is an English major and I'm an English writing major. I still don't know what the difference is.

3. Having one grammar rule that you care a lot about

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Whether it be "your vs. you're," "affect vs. effect," or "literally vs. figuratively," there's a good chance you go crazy throughout your day.

4. Writer's block

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Especially because your grade counts on it. Although, it won't be fun when it turns into your job depending on it.

5. Having to write all genres in one class

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Even though you prefer one genre and hate the others.

I don't care for nonfiction tbh.

6. Workshops

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Not your best moments.

7. Knowing how impossible it is to have a favorite book

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It's like picking a favorite child... but worse.

8. Feeling bad when you forget grammar rules

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Are you even an English major???

9. People telling you your major is the easiest one

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I get it, but at the same time, we can have a lot of work to do. We just drown in papers, reading assignments, research projects, presentations and portfolios. I still prefer it to exams and labs.

10. Figuring out life

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Honestly, there's too many things I want to do for a career and I can't pick AND each one is under my major. It is a nice problem to have. But hey I can run away from making a choice until the time comes.

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