14 Struggles All Commuter Students Will Relate To

14 Struggles All Commuter Students Will Relate to

One word: traffic.

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1. Being surrounded by bad drivers

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These become your biggest pet peeve every time you're on your way to and from college. Those ridiculously slow drivers who convince you that you'll be late if you don't get out from behind them right now, idiots who switch lanes without a signal and make you fear for your life, the speedy zig-zaggers who weave in and out of lanes like they're in a "Fast and Furious" movie...you've seen them all and HATE THEM ALL.

2. Traffic

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THE BANE OF A COMMUTER'S EXISTENCE.

3. Getting to class is a whole ordeal

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You have to wake up much earlier and leave early so you can budget for travel time, potential traffic, parking, and actually walking to the class. Meanwhile, your on-campus classmates can roll out of bed, grab some breakfast, and be at class in about half your time.

4. If you forget something, good luck.

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The biggest downside of living off campus is always when you forget something at your place. There is no running back to the dorm and grabbing whatever it is you've forgotten.

5. It can be harder to make friends

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Because a) you don't live on campus, and b) you tend to be busy outside of class, there's not always as much time to make friends when you're a commuter. When all the people you meet either live in different cities or live on-campus, it can be harder to make friends to regularly hang out with. But the friends you do make? Now those are some solid relationships.

6. Constantly filling up on gas

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Weren't you just at the gas station yesterday? No wait, that was last week…now if only these prices would go down *serious side eye at gas industry.*

7. It can be harder to partake in on-campus activities

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Joining a group, activity, Greek life, etc. can be harder when you don't live right there. You have to make the extra commutes just to be a part of events.

8. Having to bring food with you...or pay ridiculous prices for on-campus food

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Campus food is ridiculously pricey. Let's recall that our money needs to go towards gas, plus groceries/bills/rent if you have an off-campus place.

9. All your money goes towards gas and parking

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And we all know how expensive those can get. Speaking of parking...

10. WHERE DID ALL THE PARKING SPOTS GO?!!

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If you don't get to campus at the start of the day, it's a serious struggle to find a parking spot in the garages. That ish can turn into the freaking Hunger Games over finding a spot -- and when you do, getting to it before someone else does. And thanks to this, you have to budget an extra 5-10 minutes into travel time to campus. All this BS for the insane amount parking passes cost.

11. You try your best to avoid long breaks between classes

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Unfortunately, this sometimes becomes unavoidable. Cue the unwanted extra time at school in the library with those handy snacks you brought along.

12. The wait between selecting classes and actually enrolling is THE WORST

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You have to schedule your classes around driving time and/or shuttle times, on top of leaving time to work. Waiting to finally enroll is significantly more nerve-wracking than it can feel when you live on campus.

13. It's harder to be in the know about on-campus happenings

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Unless someone tells you about it, you happen to see a flyer on-campus, or you're in a Facebook group for your class at the college, you tend to miss out on a lot of on-campus things.

14. You sometimes feel like you may be missing out on the full college experience

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Sure, it may be more cost-effective to live at home or have an off-campus place. But you're not having the typical experience high school and entertainment media has hyped up over the years. You don't get to just roll out of bed and walk to class, hang out in the dining halls with your campus friends, and become besties with your freshman roommate. (Not that the latter is a bad thing, since it doesn't actually always happen. Trust me.) Your days aren't spent in the library or chilling in a campus building doing your homework, because you probably have to work outside of classes and let's not forget commuting time.

BUT. Just because you're not have the typical "college experience," doesn't mean your experience is any less valid. It certainly doesn't mean that your experience is any better or worse than that of the people living on campus.

Here's to the commuter life!

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ASU Students Push For A Healthier Dining Hall To Counter 'Freshman 15' Fears

The freshman 15 is an avoidable curse, but many students will continue to follow into its trap.

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Arizona State University students are pushing for change within the downtown Phoenix dining hall as they strive to avoid the infamous freshman 15.

The downtown Phoenix campus offers fewer dining options than the Tempe campus and has a less appetizing dining hall. The freshman 15 is a common scare among students living in the dorms, who are often freshman.

The freshman 15 is defined as a student who gains 15 pounds or more in their first year of college. Studies prove the average freshman does not exercise the right amount, is sleep deprived, has a poor diet, increases their stress level, alcohol consumption, and fatty food intake, which is most likely causing their weight gain.

Lauren Hernandez

Daniella Rudoy, a journalism major and fitness instructor at the SDFC, relived her freshman year as she provided tips for incoming freshman.

"There are a lot of workouts you can do in your dorm room as long as you have access to YouTube or a floor. You can go on a run, a walk, or do exercises that do not require equipment," Rudoy said in support of college fitness.

Rudoy said that mental health, fitness, and nutrition all correlate with one another.

"I follow the saying abs are made in the kitchen. So if you are working out day and night, but eating a giant pizza and chicken wings with a pack of beer when you come home you aren't doing yourself much good," Rudoy said.

Lauren Hernandez

The main cause for weight gain is increased alcohol consumption. 80 percent of college students drink and this includes binge-drinking, which is unhealthy for many reasons.

Students who do not drink are most likely gaining weight because of their exposure to an all-you-can-eat dining hall. The downtown Phoenix campus offers a salad bar as their only consistent healthy option for students, therefore students are left eating hamburgers, fries, and pizza.

"I haven't been to the dining hall this semester. Last semester, I went because I had no other options. I am a vegetarian and the dining hall is not accommodating to those with allergies or food restrictions. I find it very difficult to find vegetarian options," Lexi Varrato, a journalism major said.

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Varrato explained that she believes the freshman 15 is "100% real" and that incoming freshmen should research their meal plans and ask their school how their dietary restrictions will be accommodated before purchasing a non-refundable meal plan.

Megan Tretter, a nursing major at Seattle University emphasized that not every dining hall is like ASU's and that the freshman 15 is "definitely not a problem" at her school.

"I always eat healthy at my dining hall. There are a lot of good and healthy options at Seattle University. I usually go to the smoothie line in the morning, have a salad for lunch, and make myself an acai bowl after work with avocado toast in our floor's kitchen," Tretter said in support of her school's strive for healthy options.

College students across the United States have healthier dining options than ASU, but many colleges still face the same problems that students here are facing.

Tara Shultz, a journalism major at ASU believes she has avoided the "very real" freshman 15 by living at home.

"I believe the freshman 15 targets dorm residence and first-year students who do not live at home as they do not have their parents as a guide and are forced to eat at a dining hall that only serves fatty foods," Shultz emphasized.

Lauren Hernandez

The downtown Phoenix campus offers students access to the SDFC, YMCA, and Taylor Place gym, where students can take group fitness classes, run on a track, play basketball, or swim. Alternative options for students are purchasing a membership at Orangetheory or EOS Fitness.

Most students agreed with journalism major Vanessa Gonzalez that they have little time to work out due to their workload, but many students like Varrato, Tretter, and Rudoy explained that they try to work out every day as it is a stress reliever and it enriches their mental health.

Steve Fiorentino, the owner of Powered Up Nutrition encourages college students to learn what they are putting in their bodies.

"I think it starts with nutrition. Students believe they can outwork a bad diet and I believe that is their number one mistake. My advice is to stop eating fast foods and start eating whole and healthy foods along with supplements," Fiorentino stated.

The freshman 15 is an avoidable curse, but many students will continue to follow into its trap. The campus dining hall is not always the reason to blame as students have the option to decrease their meal plans, become active, and make healthy choices!

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Rutgers' Faculty Union Came To A Last-Minute Deal And There Will Be No Need For A Strike

The threat of a strike was thick in Rutgers air over the past year, there have been more than 35 negotiating sessions since March, but they were able to come to a conclusion last night without the need of a strike.

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Spring is here, you can smell the stress of finals budding on the flowers. Classes are coming to an end and every second counts at this point.

Rutgers professors and other faculty were very close to canceling all classes and halting all research in the New-Brunswick Piscataway, Camden, and Newark campuses if the strike were to happen this week. They also would have asked part-time adjunct professors, who are not in their bargaining unit, to honor picket lines and not teach classes in protest for key union demands such as including pay equity, hiring more full-time faculty to improve the faculty-to-student ratio, and a $15 minimum wage for student workers,

The thought of a strike interfering for days of education made many students shudder but many understand the importance of Rutgers faculty reasoning and what was at stake.

"Camden and Newark faculty get paid less than New Brunswick — that is unconscionable," Hughes said. "Pay people the same. Equal pay for equal work for women, for men, for faculty of color, for white faculty and for faculty in Camden, New Brunswick, and Newark."

The faculty union was not asking for bizarre change, but demanding equality and attempting to cease the gender and race wage gap.

The threat of a strike was thick in Rutgers air over the past year, there have been more than 35 negotiating sessions since March, but they were able to come to a conclusion last night without the need of a strike.

While the threat of a strike was very apparent to make change, "Rutgers University averted what would have been the first strike by professors in the school's nearly 253 -year history by reaching a last-minute deal late Tuesday with the faculty union in a series of marathon negotiating sessions."

"We made history today," Rutgers AAUP-AFT president Deepa Kumar said in a statement. "For the first time in the union's nearly 50-year history, we won equal pay for equal work for female faculty, faculty of color and for faculty in the Newark and Camden campuses. We won significant pay raises for our lowest paid members, our graduate employees who will see their pay increase from $25,969 to $30,162 over the course of the contract."

Yesterday the gender gap wage, and racial gap wage along with campus gap wage was closed.

Deepa Kumar said in a statement, "For the first time in the union's nearly 50-year history, we won equal pay for equal work for female faculty, faculty of color and for faculty in the Newark and Camden campuses. We won significant pay raises for our lowest paid members, our graduate employees who will see their pay increase from $25,969 to $30,162 over the course of the contract."

I'm proud of Rutgers for standing their ground and demanding equality. Yesterday did make history.

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