Being A Starbucks Barista Is The Best First Job Ever, You Can't Tell Me Otherwise

Being A Starbucks Barista Is The Best First Job Ever, You Can't Tell Me Otherwise

"Starbucks in Fuquay, this is Sophie, what can I get started for you?"

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I'm sitting in my old store writing this article and I've already run into three of my old regulars that still remember my name, where I go to school, and what I was studying, which I then had to explain that I changed because, you know, college. If that doesn't explain how connected I was to my store I don't what will.

There are so many amazing perks to being a Starbucks barista, I don't know where to begin.

Okay, the first perk that comes to mind is free coffee and Spotify but that definitely isn't the best one.

This job also taught me a lot about hard work, there would be some days where the store would be crazy slammed and it wouldn't stop the entire time I was there. I would work fifteen-hour days because someone would call out or not show up.

It made me really enjoy getting those paychecks because I knew I had worked my butt off for them and wasn't just waiting out the clock for my shift to be over.

This job gave me a second family that I couldn't be more thankful for. My coworkers became my best friends and some of them even like my sisters that I never had. We had the store moms and the crazy uncles that we would get frustrated with but couldn't live without.

I also gained a much stronger connection to my town and community. I got to learn about businesses I didn't know were in the shops I would pass downtown, and hear stories about the amazing people living around me. I also got to know my town cops really well because they would all come in at night before the night shift and tell great stories and just chat and laugh with us the whole time.

The most amazing perk for me was the fact that I got to make people happy.

Sometimes I was the first person they talked to in the morning and the first smile they saw. Sometimes I gave them a little afternoon pick me up so they could continue on with the rest of their day. Sometimes, if they came in close to closing, they could vent to me about their stressful day and I could listen and maybe even give them their drink for free to make their day a little better.

I just enjoyed seeing people light up after grabbing some Starbucks, and that's what made everything worth it.

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11 of the Most Annoying Starbucks Orders

I know we all have our own opinions, but come on.
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When people find out I work at Starbucks, the first thing they say is, "is it hard memorizing all the drinks?" In all honesty, it really isn't all that bad. Until these people come along. There's being high maintenance and then there's being unnecessarily annoying. These people are the latter. Some of these drinks are extremely time consuming to make, and some are just plain weird.

1. A Frappuccino with no ice

Excuse me, what?

2. A “nonfat, iced skinny mocha with light ice, whipped cream, and chocolate drizzle”

Okay, a.) nonfat comes in the ‘skinny’ description, and b.) this definitely isn’t skinny anymore. But you do you.

3. A Berry Hibiscus Refresher “shaken with berries, but no berries in the drink itself”

So you just want the drink to turn pink?

4. A “half caramel, half vanilla latte, decaf espresso heated only to 100° with nonfat milk and caramel drizzle on top”

This one is just a mouthful…

5. Upside down Macchiato

So a latte? You’re asking for a latte…?

6. Black Iced Tea *steamed* with 10 sweeteners that are not Splenda

Seriously? Just get hot black tea!

7. A “vanilla coconut milk cappuccino with no foam and whipped cream”

A cappuccino is just espresso and foam! What do you mean ‘no foam’?!

8. Layers of whipped cream with caramel and mocha drizzle between each layer

This is a coffee shop…at least get a drink.

9. A skinny vanilla latte steamed to exactly 137°

Can you honestly tell the difference between 137 and 140°?

10. A Java Chip Frappuccino with no chips

So... a mocha frapp?

11. A “venti matcha green tea Frappuccino made with soy milk, chips, and peppermint”

I’m sure this drink is actually really good, but it sure is annoying to make.

Customizing your order at Starbucks is not a big deal. Make it your own. Just don't be the a**hole that wants their milk steamed to 137 degrees.

Cover Image Credit: Business Insider

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Why Ellena Whitfield Became YouTube's 'EllenaWhat'

A conversation with Ellena Whitfield on the future of YouTube, journalism, and social media.

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Ellena Whitfield, popularly known as "EllenaWhat" has taken advantage of the social media revolution with the success of her YouTube channel, which has a following of 65,000 subscribers.

YouTube has become the gateway to success for many young internet influencers as the site became second-most popular in the world as of August 2018.

Whitfield has applied her success online to her schooling at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University. With an aspiration to become a Rolling Stone or Alternative Press journalist, Whitfield creates weekly music reviews to her channel.

"I think YouTube is relevant because of the culture our generation expresses. We grew up with the boom of social media and it's our modern-day entertainment on a more personal level. Our parents experienced the same thing through the boom of television. This is why we've started to idolize influencers like they are movie stars," Whitfield said.

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Whitfield has met many other young and successful influencers during her time at ASU and the making of her channel. Her cousin, Kendall Rae, a YouTuber with 1 million subscribers inspired her to create her channel.

Whitfield expressed that she would love to become a full-time YouTuber, but there is always the fear that the platform will crash.

"One of the biggest YouTube influencers, Jeffree Star, was making money off of Myspace and then all of a sudden the platform, which seemed revolutionary at the time, crashed and he was forced to live on his friend's couches for a while," Whitfield said.

Even with the fear of YouTube ending, Whitfield said her YouTube channel has given her a platform and the experience she needs to succeed as a journalist. Whitfield said that YouTube not only helped her gain a social relevance, but it gave her experience on how to make relevant and timely content.

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Human communication professor, Steven Corman emphasizes Whitfield's point on the importance of present-day journalists adopting the social revolution.

"Mainstream media and social media are part of a shared ecosystem. Mainstream media uses social media as a source of information, and social media plays an important role in distributing stories from mainstream media. Journalists need to embrace both if they want to be successful in creating stories and reaching larger audiences with those stories," Corman said.

The most unique aspect of journalism is that it is forever expanding. There are many new platforms and ways of sharing news such as YouTube that allows journalists to spread news faster than ever.

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Lexi Varrato, the social media director of ASU's AWSM club strives to evolve with journalism, especially when it comes to the club she helps run as it is one of the most important aspects of journalism to stay relevant.

"Having a social platform as a journalist is crucial because it helps you build your brand and create a presence in an era that is so technologically focused. Not only will you create your image, but it allows you to make connections that will help you further your career," Varrato said.

The rise of young influencers is very inspiring to Whitfield as she says it is realistic to make a career as an influencer. She said that YouTube can lead creators to many different careers such as creating a fashion line or becoming a journalist as she aspires.

Whitfield plans to keep her channel as long as YouTube exists because she loves every aspect of documenting her life and sharing it with her audience. Whitfield expressed that she cannot wait to see where YouTube is in a couple years and believes many college students should give YouTube a try.

"People that have millions of subscribers all started with zero. If you don't start now you're never going to know what could happen," Whitfield said.

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