The 2018 Southwest Ohio Voters' Guide

The 2018 Southwest Ohio Voters' Guide

You didn't ask for this, but this is for your benefit, believe me.

383
views

Election Day is November 6, 2018, and early voting has already started in Ohio! As you begin to look into the candidates and issues on the ballot, look no further, as this will be a helpful "who's who" of the 2018 midterm election for Butler, Hamilton and Warren Counties. If you are not from this area, then no worries as Ballotpedia provides a wonderful service in giving you a sample ballot of what you will need to be voting on.

Here is a picture of Ohio State District Maps for Ohio State House of Representatives.

Here is a picture of Ohio State District Maps for Ohio State Senate.

Here is a picture of Ohio Federal District Maps for US House of Representatives.

Governor's Race

Republican: DeWine/Husted

Democrat: Cordray/Sutton

Third Party: Irvine/Grayson (Libertarian), Gadell-Newton/Joeseph (Green).

Main Issues: The handling of sexual assault cases; as both have served as Attorney General, here is the non-partisan fact-checking of the claims being made.

Also, the way to deal with the drug epidemic happening: DeWine is for a continued "war on drugs" to reduce use and crime, while Cordray is for lessening sentences and focusing on rehab.

US Senate

Republican: Jim Renacci

Democrat: Sherrod Brown

Major issues: Debates between the two are set up for October 14th, as well as October 26th, which will take place at Miami University.

US House of Representatives

Hamilton County:

Republican: Steve Chabot (OH-1), Brad Wenstrup (OH-2)

Democrat: Aftab Pureval (OH-1), Jill Schiller (OH-2)

Libertarians: Dirk Kabula (OH-1), James Condit (OH-2)

Major issues (OH-1): Healthcare coverage: Chabot is against the ACA, while Aftab is for it, including pre-existing conditions coverage. Being for the people: Both candidates have sent out commercials saying they are for the people; Aftab is alleging that Chabot's acceptance of Corporate Super PAC money makes him only for the people with money, whereas Aftab is running a grassroots, people-based campaign.

Major issues (OH-2): "taking back the house" and healthcare coverage

Butler County:

Republican: Warren Davidson (OH-8)

Democrat: Vanessa Enoch (OH-8)

Major issues: Education, accurate representation; Enoch is alleging that the far-right Davidson is too far out for the average citizen in the district, as she can create a happy medium. Davidson is the incumbent and continuing to run on his accomplishments in office.

Warren County:

Republican: Steve Chabot (OH-1)

Democrat: Aftab Pureval (OH-1)

Third Parties: Dirk Kubala (OH-1)

Major issues: Healthcare coverage: Chabot is against the ACA, while Aftab is for it, including pre-existing conditions coverage. Being for the people: Both candidates have sent out commercials saying they are for the people; Aftab is alleging that Chabot's acceptance of Corporate Super PAC money makes him only for the people with money, whereas Aftab is running a grassroots, people-based campaign.

Ohio Secretary of State

Republican: Frank LaRose

Democrat: Kathleen Clyde

Libertarian: Dustin Nanna

Major issues: Voter suppression laws and what level of cleansing is needed for voter registration

Ohio Attorney General

Republican: Dave Yost

Democrat: Steven Dettelbach

Major issues: Sexual assault awareness

Ohio Treasurer

Republican: Robert Sprague

Democrat: Rob Richardson

Major issues: Expansion of office

Ohio Auditor of State

Republican: Keith Faber

Democrat: Zach Space

Libertarian: Robert Coogan

Major issues: Debate video here

Ohio House of Representatives

Hamilton County:

Republican: Tom Brinkman Jr. (District 27), Jonathon Dever (District 28), Carrie Davis (District 29), Bill Sietz (District 30)

Democrat: Christine Fisher (District 27), Jessica Miranda (District 28), Louis Blessing III (District 29), Clayton Adams (District 30)

Major issues: Education and "the fight for the little man"

Butler County:

Republican: Sara Carruthers (District 51), George Lang (District 52), Candice Keller (District 53), Paul Zeltwanger (District 54)

Democrat: Susan Vaughn (District 51), Kathy Wyenandt (District 52), Rebecca Howard (District 53), Nikki Foster (District 54)

Major issues: Education and "the fight for the little man"

Warren County:

Republican: Paul Zeltwanger (District 54), Scott Lipps (District 62)

Democrat: Nikki Foster (District 54), Jim Stanton (District 62)

Major issues: Education and "the fight for the little man"

Ohio State Senate District 7

Parts of Hamilton and Butler counties, and all of Warren County:

Republican: Steve Wilson

Democrat: Sarah Bitters

Major Issues: Education and "the fight for the little man"

County Auditor

Hamilton County:

Republican: Nancy Aichholz

Democrat: Dusty Rhodes

County Commissioner 

Hamilton County:

Republican: Chris Monzel

Democrat: Stephanie Dumas

Major issues: Watch debate here

Hamilton County Court of Common Pleas Ohio, commencing January 1, 2019

Republican: Steve E. Martin

Democrat: Terry Nestor

Major issues: Keeping Ohio's laws legal and fair for residents

Hamilton County Court of Common Pleas Ohio General Division

Republican: Lisa Allen, Leslie Ghiz

Democrat: Pavan Parikh, Arica Underwood

Major issues: Keeping Ohio's laws legal and fair for residents

Hamilton County Court of Common Pleas Ohio

Republican: Curt Hartman

Democrat: Thomas Beridon

Major issues: Keeping Ohio's laws legal and fair for residents

Ohio First District Court of Appeals

Republican: Charles Miller, Robert Winkler, Dale Stalf, Dennis Deters

Democrat: Marilyn Zayas, Candace Crouse, Ginger Brock, Pierre Bergeron

Major Issues: Keeping Ohio's laws legal and fair for its residents; vote for 3

Ohio Supreme Court

Republican: Craig Baldwin, Mary DeGenero

Democrat: Melody Stewart, Michael Donnelly

Major Issues: Keeping Ohio's laws legal and fair for its residents

Ohio Issue 1

Yes: Lessen drug sentences in favor of focusing on rehabilitation and cure from the disease of addiction.

No: Stay in-line with the "War on Drugs" or tough on crime philosophy that has been used since the Reagan era to thwart repeated drug offenders from continuing.

Major Debate: With the drug epidemic reaching new heights, people are looking to see what can best help Ohio's citizens combat this growing issue.

Be sure to get informed and VOTE on November 6.

Popular Right Now

An Open Letter To Democrats From A Millennial Republican

Why being a Republican doesn't mean I'm inhuman.
56929
views

Dear Democrats,

I have a few things to say to you — all of you.

You probably don't know me. But you think you do. Because I am a Republican.

Gasp. Shock. Horror. The usual. I know it all. I hear it every time I come out of the conservative closet here at my liberal arts university.

SEE ALSO: What I Mean When I Say I'm A Young Republican

“You're a Republican?" people ask, saying the word in the same tone that Draco Malfoy says “Mudblood."

I know that not all Democrats feel about Republicans this way. Honestly, I can't even say for certain that most of them do. But in my experience, saying you're a Republican on a liberal college campus has the same effect as telling someone you're a child molester.

You see, in this day and age, with leaders of the Republican Party standing up and spouting unfortunately ridiculous phrases like “build a wall," and standing next to Kim Davis in Kentucky after her release, we Republicans are given an extreme stereotype. If you're a Republican, you're a bigot. You don't believe in marriage equality. You don't believe in racial equality. You don't believe in a woman's right to choose. You're extremely religious and want to impose it on everyone else.

Unfortunately, stereotypes are rooted in truth. There are some people out there who really do think these things and feel this way. And it makes me mad. The far right is so far right that they make the rest of us look bad. They make sure we aren't heard. Plenty of us are fed up with their theatrics and extremism.

For those of us brave enough to wear the title “Republican" in this day and age, as millennials, it's different. Many of us don't agree with these brash ideas. I'd even go as far as to say that most of us don't feel this way.

For me personally, being a Republican doesn't even mean that I automatically vote red.

When people ask me to describe my political views, I usually put it pretty simply. “Conservative, but with liberal social views."

“Oh," they say, “so you're a libertarian."

“Sure," I say. But that's the thing. I'm not really a libertarian.

Here's what I believe:

I believe in marriage equality. I believe in feminism. I believe in racial equality. I don't want to defund Planned Parenthood. I believe in birth control. I believe in a woman's right to choose. I believe in welfare. I believe more funds should be allocated to the public school system.

Then what's the problem? Obviously, I'm a Democrat then, right?

Wrong. Because I have other beliefs too.

Yes, I believe in the right to choose — but I'd always hope that unless a pregnancy would result in the bodily harm of the woman, that she would choose life. I believe in welfare, but I also believe that our current system is broken — there are people who don't need it receiving it, and others who need it that cannot access it.

I believe in capitalism. I believe in the right to keep and bear arms, because I believe we have a people crisis on our hands, not a gun crisis. Contrary to popular opinion, I do believe in science. I don't believe in charter schools. I believe in privatizing as many things as possible. I don't believe in Obamacare.

Obviously, there are other topics on the table. But, generally speaking, these are the types of things we millennial Republicans get flack for. And while it is OK to disagree on political beliefs, and even healthy, it is NOT OK to make snap judgments about me as a person. Identifying as a Republican does not mean I am the same as Donald Trump.

Just because I am a Republican, does not mean you know everything about me. That does not give you the right to make assumptions about who I am as a person. It is not OK for you to group me with my stereotype or condemn me for what I feel and believe. And for a party that prides itself on being so open-minded, it shocks me that many of you would be so judgmental.

So I ask you to please, please, please reexamine how you view Republicans. Chances are, you're missing some extremely important details. If you only hang out with people who belong to your own party, chances are you're missing out on great people. Because, despite what everyone believes, we are not our stereotype.

Sincerely,

A millennial Republican

Cover Image Credit: NEWSWORK.ORG

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

2020 Democrats Need To Stick Together If They Don't Want A Repeat Of 2016

Democrats have to be willing to swallow their pride if they want the executive branch to turn blue.

353
views

With a sufficient amount of democratic hopefuls, one of the largest problems in the party is actually choosing one. In the 2016 election, Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton were two household names that circled about. However, even after it became statistically improbably for Sanders to win the Democratic primary, he did not back down. He continued to campaign, which led to divisions in the party and might have been the reason to why the Democrats lost the election. Obviously, we have to learn from the past with the upcoming 2020 election.

Parties do better when they stick together.

When there is a division within the party, the votes get divided ultimately giving the win to the competing party. In the 2016 election, Democrats were strongly divided to a point that they were willing to vote for the Republican candidate rather than the other Democratic candidate (which did happen). Some Sanders supporters were unwilling to vote for Clinton just because it was her. They ended up voting for Trump since he wasn't Hillary. We know how that all worked out.

Democrats have to stick together and not become a hindrance to each other.

Although the candidate you were rooting for didn't win the primaries, they still share more ideals than the opposing party does. Elections are becoming more candidate-centric than party-centric which is quite concerning. Candidates have personal interests in mind and could change them on a whim. Parties have an established party platform that does change but only changes every four years.

Democrats don't want to relive what happened in the 2016 elections again.

With the high number of candidates running for the Democratic ballot, the fear of 2016 occurring again is high. Many of the candidates are extremely qualified and have dedicated voters that might put the candidate before the party. Democrats have to be willing to swallow their pride if they want the executive branch to turn blue.

Related Content

Facebook Comments